Reports

Rapeseed meal in feed for Atlantic salmon 2

Published:

02/02/2022

Authors:

Jón Árnason, Ólafur Ingi Sigurgeirsson, Gunnar Kristjánsson, Morten Simonsen, Birgir Örn Smárason

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

contact

Birgir Örn Smárason

Group Leader

birgir@matis.is

This report provides a summary of progress and main results of the AVS funded research & innovation project “rapeseed meal in feed for Atlantic Salmon 2”. The objective of the project was to investigate the effect of rapeseed meal inclusion in feed on growth, feed utility and fillet composition in Atlantic salmon.

The report is closed until January 1, 2024. / This report is closed until January 1st 2024.

Reports

Improved quality, shelf life and less waste in the value chain of Icelandic vegetables

Published:

01/02/2022

Authors:

Ólafur Reykdal, Didar Farid, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

Matvælasjóður

contact

Ólafur Reykdal

Project Manager

olafur.reykdal@matis.is

The project Improved quality, shelf life and less waste in the value chain of Icelandic vegetables was intended to strengthen the vegetable sector in Iceland with new knowledge and support increased production of high quality vegetables.
The main topics of the project were (1) shelf life research, (2) examinations of ways to create value from by-products, and (3) analysis of ways to reduce shrinkage in the value chain. This report is about
shelf life research and analysis of opportunities in the value chain.
The project submits three other reports on the above main topics.
The project has been carried out in collaboration with horticultural farmers and retailers.

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Reports

Summary report of a digestibility trial on Atlantic salmon in seawater performed by Matís for Nordic Soya

Published:

13/01/2022

Authors:

Wolfgang Koppe, Georges Lamborelle, David Sutter

Supported by:

Nordic Soya

This report is closed

Reports

Nordic Salmon - Summary Challenges and solutions in salmon farming within the Nordic region

Published:

15/01/2022

Authors:

Gunnar Þórðarson, Gunnvør in the North

Supported by:

Nordic co-operation

The project was supported by AG-Fisk and managed by six people with knowledge on the subjects or relation to the industry. The group came from Iceland, Norway, Faroe Islands, Denmark and Finland.

The workshop aimed to gather experts in specific fields of salmon farming in the Nordic countries. Areas of uppermost importance for the Nordic salmon aquaculture were identified as; salmon- and sea louse challenges, optimal feed composition sources, and production of large smolts.

Four specialists in sea- and salmon louse and preventive measures against these parasites came from three countries, Iceland, Faroes Islands and Norway. Four experts in new sources and optimal compositions of feed for different environments came from three countries, Iceland, Norway, and Finland. And tree experts in smolt hatcheries (RAS) discussed large smolts production from two countries, Iceland, and Denmark. 

There were 60 people at the meeting held in Olfus Cluster in Thorlakshofn, a fisheries community in Sothern Iceland. Olvus Cluster is a collaborative project by entrepreneurs planning large-scale production of land-based salmon farming. 

The guests of the meeting had it in common of working in the aquaculture business, serving the industry or being a public body. 

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Reports

Seaweed supplementation to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions by cattle

Published:

23/09/2021

Authors:

Ásta H. Pétursdóttir, Natasa Desnica, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Eva Margrét Jónudóttir, Rebecca Sim, Chris Reynolds, Dave Humphries, Stella Lignau, Collette Fagan, Markus Rodehutscord, Susanne Kuenzel, Amélia Camarinha Silva, Liz Ford

Supported by:

SeaCH4NGE

The goal of SeaCH4NGE was to find seaweed that can reduce methane emissions from cattle. This report contains detailed results from this project. Brief summary of results: In vitro analysis (Hohenheim gas test and Rusitec) showed that seaweed reduced total gas production, methane production and methane concentration for three types of seaweed compared to TMR (control sample). The greatest decrease was seen in Asparagopsis taxiformis. Algae samples showed little degradation in the rumen compared to other common ruminant feeds. In-vivo studies: No significant effect on methane production was observed when cattle were fed a mixture of seaweed, nor when dairy cows were fed a brown algae mixture. By giving a small amount of red algae (A. taxiformis) together with brown algae, a slight decrease in methane production could be seen. Quality and safety - milk and meat: Samples were analyzed for heavy metals, minerals and iodine. The content of seaweed did not have a negative effect as the toxic elements As, Cd, Hg and Pb were either not present or in very low amounts. Seaweed (all three mixtures) affected the iodine concentration, which increased. Sensory evaluation: The seaweed treatment affected the taste of butter and UHT milk, but this did not affect whether the products were considered better or worse. No difference in taste was found in beef.
This report is closed until 31.12.2023.

This report is closed

Reports

Seaweed that improves feed for dairy cows - Final report

Published:

15/09/2021

Authors:

Ásta Heiðrún Elísabet Pétursdóttir, Eric Newton, Guðfríður Daníelsdóttir, Gunnar Ríkharðsson, Natasa Desnica, Sara Lind Ingvarsdóttir, Sokratis Stergiadis

The project is a continuation of the project "Seaweed that improves feed for dairy cows - increased benefit and quality?" With the main goal of examining whether it would be possible to increase the benefit of dairy cows through seaweed administration and examine the chemical content and quality of milk. Also whether seaweed could be used as a mineral source, for example for organic feed that could lead to new products such as high-fat milk and therefore stimulate innovation in cattle breeding.
In this project, special emphasis was placed on examining individual samples of milk and whether algae administration as part of cow feed had an effect on heavy metals, minerals, eg iodine, in the milk.
The greatest effect was on the iodine concentration of the milk.

News

Viggó Þór Marteinsson honored by the French Embassy

The scientist Viggó Þór Marteinsson received the floor National Order of Merit.

Viggó studied biology at the University of Iceland and graduated with a BS degree. He went to France for postgraduate studies and defended his doctoral dissertation at the Université de Bretagne Occidentale in early 1997. Viggó is a specialist in microbiology and professor at the Faculty of Food and Nutrition at the University of Iceland as well as being a professional leader in research and innovation at Matís ohf.

After completing his doctorate from the Université de Bretagne Occidentale, he has collaborated well with the French scientific community. This connection has led to many French students coming to Iceland and working for longer and shorter periods on projects that have been part of their projects for a master's or doctoral degree.

"Although some have completed or are completing doctoral studies under my supervision at the University of Iceland and have worked on their research projects at research institutes such as Matís," says Viggó. "Some of these students have been here for a long time after their studies and have research positions at Matís. This successful co-operation between the nations in the field of science continues and I firmly believe that it will be strengthened in the future. "

The word was published on November 20, 2020, but due to Covid-19, the word was given on June 9, 2021.

Matís sincerely congratulates Viggó on the word.

News

Nordic Salmon workshop

contact

Gunnar Þórðarson

Regional Manager

gunnar.thordarson@matis.is

A workshop on salmon farming was held on 27 October Ölfus Cluster, Hafnarberg 1, 815 Þorlákshöfn.

The topics of the workshop were:

  • Future feed preparation for salmon farming
  • Future response to lice problems in marine fires
  • Cultivation of juveniles in a controlled environment on land (RAS)

The agenda of the meeting has been attached to the agenda here:

New development in sea- and salmon louse

  1. Lumpfish genetic research: Dr. Ólöf Dóra Bartels Jónsdóttir, Iceland
  2. Fish welfare to prevent sea lice issues: Esbern Patursson, Faroes Islands
  3. Dispersion of sea lice, connection between farms and economic cost: Tróndur Kragesteen, Faroe Islands
  4. Salmon lice biology, Sussie Dalvin, Norway

Feed: New sources and optimal composition for different environments

  1. Special feed production from pelagic production, Sigurjón Arason, Iceland
  2. Salmon Feed: Turid Mørkøre, Norway
  3. Kalle Sinisalo: Research scientist, Finland
  4. Challenges in feed production for salmon in the future, Gunnar Örn Kristjánsson, Iceland

Production of large smolts in hatcheries

  1. Large smolts production: Sigurdur Petursson, Iceland

About the meeting:

The meeting is open to anyone who is interested in salmon farming and wants to get to know the main things that are happening regarding its topics. There has been a lot of discussion about land-based farming, but the cultivation of juveniles is partly land-based farming, where placement in sea cages is shortened but the length of controlled farming on land. It is part of the fight against salmon / fish lice, for example.

Refreshments will be offered at the meeting and payment for ISK will be expected. 3,000. The meeting will be held in English.

The agenda of the meeting is outlined below.

All interested are welcome!


The Nordic Salmon Workshop in Thorlakshofn 27th of October at 08:30

A workshop on salmon farming will be held on October 27 at Ölfus Cluster, Hafnarberg 1, 815 Þorlákshöfn. The meeting starts at 08:30 and ends at 17:00 the same day.

The workshop subjects:

  1. Salmon feed: new sources and optimal composition for different environments
  2. New development in sea- and salmon louse
  3. Production of large smolts in hatcheries
  1. Salmon feed will be a very dynamic area of research and development in the future. With feed requirements of salmon growing in extreme environmental conditions, such as low temperature, are not fully understood. Furthermore, technical solution to minimize movements of fish in sea cage during the coldest periods in winter could improve conditions of fish during the coldest months
  2. Several options already exist for chemically treating salmon lice in sea cages. However, there are two main problems associated with treating lice in such a way. Firstly, there are negative environmental impacts and secondly, lice can and have developed resistance to many of the available chemicals currently being used
  3. There has been a growing interest in land-based salmon farming under more controlled environment. Large smolt farming is a land-based farming, with longer growing time ashore and shorter in ONP, reducing risk in farming with higher cost. Reducing lead time in sea also enables producers to reduce the spread in biomass throughout the year. This may be one of the most sustainable ways of maximizing utilization of licenses.

The meeting is open to anybody interested in salmon farming. Included are refreshments at the meeting and reception at Lax-inn in Reykjavík after the meeting. The cost is ISK 3,000.

The meeting will be in English.

The board

  • Gunnar Thordarson, Matís, Isafjordur, Iceland
  • Björgolfur Hávardsson, NCE Seafood Innovation Cluster AS Norway
  • Gunnvør á Norði and Jóhanna Lava Kötlum, Fiskaaling, Faroe Islands
  • Kurt Buchmann, Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark
  • Niels Henrik Henriksen, The Danish Aquaculture Organization, Aarhus, Denmark
  • Marko Koivuneva, Finnish Fish Farmers' Association, Helsinki, Finland.

Instituions participating

  • Matís ohf. - Gunnar Thordarson (Iceland)
  • Björgolfur Hávardsson, NCE Seafood Innovation Cluster AS Norway
  • Fiskaaling - Gunnvør á Norði and Jóhanna Lava Kötlum - (Faroe Islands)
  • University of Copenhagen, Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Frederiksberg - Kurt Buchmann (Denmark)
  • The Danish Aquaculture Organization, Aarhus - Henrik Henriksen (Denmark)
  • Finnish Fish Farmers' Association, Helsinki - Marko Koivuneva (Finland
  • Ölfus Cluster - Páll Marvin Jónsson

Reports

Seaweed supplementation to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions by cattle

Published:

27/09/2021

Authors:

Dr. Ásta H. Pétursdóttir (Matís), Dr. Helga Gunnlaugsdóttir (Matís), Natasa Desnica (Matís), Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir (Matís), Susanne Kuenzel (University of Hohenheim), Dr. Markus Rodehutscord (University of Hohenheim), Dr. Chris Reynolds (University of Reading), Dr. David Humphries (University of Reading), James Draper (ABP).

Supported by:

EIT Food

contact

Ásta Heiðrún E. Pétursdóttir

Head of Public Health and Food Safety

asta.h.petursdottir@matis.is

SeaCH4NGE results include a detailed analysis of the chemical composition of seaweed, including heavy metals and nutritional composition. Iodine concentration proved to be the main limiting factor regarding seaweed as a feed supplement. The decrease in methane observed in laboratory methane production experiments (in vitro) is likely due to compounds called fluorotannin rather than bromoform, a known substance that can reduce methane production in ruminants. In vitro screening of the seaweed showed a moderate decrease in methane, but lower methane production was dependent on seaweed species. The reduction was dose-dependent, ie by using more algae, a greater methane reduction could be seen in vitro. The same two types of seaweed were used in the Rusitec experiment (in vitro), which is a very comprehensive analysis that provides further information. An in-vivo study in cows showed that feeding cattle with a mixture of brown algae has a relatively small effect on methane emissions. However, fluorotannins are known to have other beneficial effects when consumed by ruminants. The report also includes a survey of British cow farmers' attitudes towards algae feeding and climate change.

Skýrslan er lokuð / This report is closed

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Reports

Seaweed supplementation to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions by cattle (SeaCH4NGE-PLUS)

Published:

17/09/2021

Authors:

Matís: Ásta H Pétursdóttir, Brynja Einarsdóttir, Elísabet Eik Guðmundsdóttir, Natasa Desnica, Rebecca Sim. University of Hohenheim: Susanne Kuenzel, Markus Rodehutscord, Natascha Titze, Katharina Wild.

Supported by:

Climate Fund, Rannís

contact

Ásta Heiðrún E. Pétursdóttir

Head of Public Health and Food Safety

asta.h.petursdottir@matis.is

This report contains the main experimental results of the SeaCH4NGE-PLUS project. In short, screening of the chemical content showed approx. 20 algae species collected in Iceland in 2020 and 2021, not bromoform-rich seaweed, but bromoform-rich seaweed can have a methane-reducing effect when given to cattle. Samples of brown algae were often high in phenol content, indicating a high fluorotannin content that has been linked to moderate methane reduction. Studies on Asparagopsis algae. indicated that these samples could have a short shelf life, but the effect was smaller than expected. Fermentation can have a small positive effect on methane production (ie slightly reduce production), but the extraction of the florotannin did not have a decisive effect on methane production. This report is closed until 31.12.2023.

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