Reports

Trendy fish with Nordic Flavors, Workshop in Ålesund, Norway 29-30 October 2019

Published:

20/12/2019

Authors:

Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Ingebrigt Bjørkevoll, Wenche Emblem Larssen

Supported by:

AG Fisk 185-2019

contact

Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir

Project Manager

kolbrun.sveinsdottir@matis.is

Trendy fish with Nordic Flavors, Workshop in Ålesund, Norway 29-30 October 2019

Salt-curing of cod is an ancient storage method. Today, salt-curing is not merely a storage method, but a method of producing high quality products of specific characteristics. To promote a product as salt-cured fish, with long tradition, history and strong connection to Nordic livelihoods, it is important to motivate the whole chain, from producers, to retailers, to chefs, to schools and the consumers.

AG-Fisk (Arbejdsgruppen for Fiskerisamarbedet) under the auspices of the Nordic Council of Ministers has provided funding for a project with the aim of increasing the knowledge of seafood, such as salt-cured cod, thus contributing to increased respect and thus increased value. The project is led by Matís and one of the project tasks was to organize a workshop in Norway in collaboration with Møreforsking and Klippfiskakademiet in Ålesund. The workshop was co-financed by The Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries in Norway. The workshop was held on 29th and 30th of October 2019 and the focus was salted and dried cod. Culinary students together with chefs from Norway, Faroe Islands and Iceland, aimed to develop new trendy dishes with emphasis on Nordic raw materials combined with salted and dried cod. During the workshop, Nordic traditions and history were presented, the different salt fish products and their different sensory properties. The participants tasted different cod products (thawed, lightly salted, desalted salt-cured cod and desalted clip fish) with the aim of analyzing the different sensory properties of these products. The results clearly demonstrated the unique sensory properties of salt-cured and clip fish products.

Nordic chefs gave talks of their experiences, thoughts, visions and ideas for Nordic raw materials, to set the scene for the work ahead. Group work was focused on analyzing opportunities and barriers, todays status and ideas to increase consumption of traditional products, product ideas to make salt-cured and clip fish more known and attractive in home markets. One of the main targets was to increase the consumption among young people by inspiring them to create new, trendy recipes and dishes that they would like. Based on this, innovative dishes were made and evaluated during the workshop. The variety in the dishes, clearly demonstrated the enormous potentials of this traditional raw material, to be used in delicious trendy innovative dishes, from simple and easily prepared to challenging and ambitious.

The group discussions showed that traditions were considered a strength but a lack of ready to cook and ready to eat meals as well as changes in consumption habits were considered a threat. This kind of information is important when setting the scene for the future of salt-cured fish, both in home markets and export markets. The Norwegian participants were familiar with salt-cured fish and clip fish and it was not uncommon to prepare such dishes at home, and some variety was available in the supermarkets. However, to increase product variety and increased consumption of traditional Nordic foods such as salted fish, it is important to work with kids, both at home and at schools. It is of great importance to educate them about Nordic food and involve them in food preparation, both at home and in school. The emphasis on sustainability, health and positive climate impact, as well as adapting food trends from all over the world, can be used to inspire new innovative dishes made from traditional raw materials such as salted fish.

Emphasis must be placed on increasing knowledge among chefs, as well as consumers, of the different products made of salted fish, such as lightly salted cod, fully salt-cured and clip fish, as the characteristics of these products are very different. How consumers, and not least young consumers, are to be educated and motivated to consume such dishes needs thorough consideration. Newer means of communication deserve attention, with focus on how the young people seek, find and receive information.

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Reports

Holding of Arctic char in a RAS transport system

Published:

16/12/2019

Authors:

Guðmundur Stefánsson, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir

Supported by:

EIT Food

contact

Guðmundur Stefánsson

Head Research Group Leader

gudmundur.stefansson@matis.is

Holding of Arctic char in a RAS transport system

In September 2019 two live holding trials with Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) were carried out at Matís where the fish was kept for up to eight days in a RAS holding and transport system developed by Technion, Israel Institute of Technology. The RAS system, which recirculated the water, controlled the pH and removed accumulated ammonia, was set up in a 40 feet reefer tank to control the temperature at 4 ° C. The project was funded by EIT food and the participants were Technion and Matís.

The results show that Arctic char could be held at a density of 80 kg / m3 at 4 ° C for 8 days in the RAS system, without adverse effects on mortality. Moreover, no differences were found in the sensory quality (flavor, odor, appearance and texture) of the stored fish compared to fish before it was placed in the RAS system. The stored fish had however more gaping, higher cooking yield and marginally lighter color than fish before placing in the system. 

However, a bio-load of 135-145 kg / m3 Arctic char in the RAS storage and holding system led to a high mortality. Moreover, on slaughter the surviving fish had adverse sensory quality as indicated by loss of characteristic flavor and odor as well as firmer, drier and tougher texture. The fish had a high incidence of gaping, a high cooking yield and showed evidence of deformation on cooking.

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Reports

Consumer survey on salted fish

Published:

30/08/2019

Authors:

Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir

Supported by:

AG Fisk, AVS Research Fund

contact

Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir

Sensory evaluation manager

adalheiduro@matis.is

Consumer survey on salted fish

There is a long tradition for processing salted fish in this country, but before that the salt was used primarily to extend the shelf life of the fish. Today, salted fish is considered a gourmet product that is very popular in many parts of the world, not least in Southern Europe, where the traditions and quality of Icelandic salted fish play a major role. Matís ran workshops with salted fish producers and chefs in April and May 2019. Their goal was, among other things, to assess the position of salted fish in the domestic market. It was stated that information was needed on Icelanders' views on salted fish in order to better assess the opportunities in Iceland. Based on the results of the workshops, an online survey was conducted with the aim of researching the image of salted fish products in the minds of Icelanders, general knowledge of salted fish and its history, and the experience of salted fish. The consumption frequency of salted fish, lightly salted fish and night-salted fish was also examined, as well as attitudes towards salted fish compared to lightly salted and night-salted fish. The survey was conducted in May 2019 and was published by 17,000 Facebook users, 18 years and older. A total of 505 people completed the survey.

There was a big difference in the participants' answers according to age. The results show that consumption of both fish and salted fish decreases with decreasing age. Only about 29% participants aged 18-29 eat salted fish once a year or more often than the corresponding proportion for the oldest group, 60-70 years, is about 94%. The main reason why participants do not eat salted fish is that they do not like it. Other reasons are that it is too salty, lack of supply, that there is little tradition for salted fish, and that fresh fish is preferred. In general, attitudes towards salted fish were quite positive and the experience of those who have bought salted fish in a restaurant, fish shop and grocery store was good. However, younger participants are generally more negative about salted fish and more likely to find the taste of salted fish bad than older ones. Knowledge and interest in salted fish also decreases with decreasing age, and the same applies to the purchase frequency of salted fish, lightly salted fish and night-salted fish. The results indicate that the taste of salted fish varies according to age. Older participants are more likely to want salted fish well salted and find it less salty than younger ones.

Saltfish has been intertwined with Icelandic history and food culture for centuries. The results of this survey, however, show declining knowledge, interest and consumption of salted fish in younger age groups. This development can be explained by an increased selection of foods, changed tastes, attitudes and habits. It is likely that the image of salted fish as a quality product will be affected and that great changes are taking place in the consumption of salted fish among Icelanders. In order to promote the consumption of salted fish, it needs to be better promoted and made more visible, not least among younger age groups, whether in canteens, supermarkets, fishmongers or restaurants.

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Reports

Increased quality and stability of frozen herring products

Published:

30/08/2019

Authors:

Magnea Karlsdóttir, Huong Thi Thu Dang, María Guðjónsdóttir, Ásbjörn Jónsson, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

AVS R&D Fund

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Increased quality and stability of frozen herring products

Freezing and frozen storage has proven to be an effective method to preserve and prolong the storage life of seafood products. Production of frozen products provides all year around product availability although the catching is seasonal. There are several factors that can affect the quality and stability of frozen fish products, including the state of the raw material, processing methods and storage conditions.

The aim of the study was to explore how the physicochemical properties of frozen herring fillets are affected regarding the state of the raw material during processing as well as storage conditions. Atlantic herring was processed and frozen pre- and post-rigor and stored at stable (-25 ° C) and abused storage conditions. To investigate the storage stability and physical properties of the fillets, thawing drip, cooking yield and color were evaluated, as well as proximate composition, fatty acid composition, pH and lipid degradation of the light and the dark muscle.

The study demonstrated the importance of stable and controlled temperature during storage and transportation of frozen herring products. Processing and freezing pre-rigor, in combination with stable storage conditions, was shown to be beneficial in terms of preventing lipid oxidation, as well as reducing thawing loss and maintaining the cooking yield of the herring fillets.

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Reports

Temperature changes during processing, transportation and storage of frozen herring products

Published:

30/08/2019

Authors:

Magnea Karlsdóttir, Finnur Jónasson, Ásbjörn Jónsson, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

AVS R&D Fund

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Temperature changes during processing, transportation and storage of frozen herring products

The main objective of the project was to maximize the qualiry and value of herring products. Quality and stability of frocen herring products seasonally and impact of pre-cooling, freezing and storage condition were explored. The results will not only lead to a less decrease in quality due to storage and transportation, but also increase understanding on connection between product defect and their influence on the raw material from catch to market.

The results showed thar frozen herring products did not get enough cooling through the process, from production to export, and in some cases the variation was too much. The freezing planti n Iceland was good, and all the pallets were kept at right temperature. The problem is, when they were taken out of the freezing storage in Iceland, the cooling was not sufficient, which was necessary to maintain low temperature. It is difficult to prevent heat stress when exporting frozen product.

The results of the project indicated that the temprature in freezing trawls was stable during the sailing. Also the results indicated that it is a need for improvements in the freezing plant in Poland, where the temperature in freezing storage is higher compared to Iceland. Transportation in containers was much better than in freezing trawlers, but much more expensive.

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Reports

Chemical composition of silver - Seasonal fluctuations

Published:

26/08/2019

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Karl Gunnarsson

Supported by:

Fisheries Project Fund, AVS

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Chemical composition of silver - Seasonal fluctuations

The aim of the study was to examine the amount of nutrients, minerals and trace elements in oats by season to assess when it is best to harvest them from a nutritional point of view. Samples were taken at two locations, Tjaldanes by Saurbær in Dalasýsla and Herdísarvík by Selvogur in Reykjanes in the period from October 2011 to April 2013.

Seasonal fluctuations were detected in the content of nutrients in silver in both Herdísarvík and Tjaldanes and then followed the same process. In early spring, fiber, protein, fat, ash and water levels peaked. Measurements also indicated seasonal fluctuations in some of the minerals and trace elements measured; potassium, phosphorus, iodine, selenium, cadmium and lead. Heavy metals were within the limit limits with the exception of cadmium in winter.

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Reports

The effect of mortality on fish quality ll

Published:

15/08/2019

Authors:

Gunnar Þórðarson, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund (R 17 019-17)

contact

Gunnar Þórðarson

Regional Manager

gunnar.thordarson@matis.is

The effect of mortality on fish quality ll

The purpose of the study was, on the one hand, to investigate the effect of supercooling on the death-hardening process of cod and salmon fillets and to compare with conventional cooling; and, on the other hand, to examine whether filleting at different times in the death solidification process (before mortality, in mortality and after the process ends) had a product quality. For salmon, a preliminary experiment was performed on which the main experiment was based, while in cod an experiment was performed on wild cod and farmed fish.

Supercooling of cod is based on cooling down to -0.8 ° C and salmon at -1.2 ° C, while conventional cooling is based on 0 ° C for both species. Differences between groups were examined and also differences within groups were compared. Small differences within groups indicate a more accurate and credible conclusion.

The results of a survey carried out by a sensory evaluation team show that the effect of supercooling is considerable as there is less contraction in the death solidification process, and the effect on quality is therefore smaller. There is a difference between wild cod and farmed cod, as it is known that the water content between cells is less in farmed development than wild. It might be interesting to look at the difference between farmed salmon and wild salmon, but that was outside the scope of this study.

It can be concluded that with supercooling it would be possible to process salmon for freezing to death without degrading quality, which could be important in the marketing of fresh products in the future, as the salmon could be processed immediately at slaughter and thus increase shelf life in foreign markets.

One of the aims of the project was to prepare promotional material on the death solidification process and its impact on the quality of products for salmon and cod producers in Iceland, which could benefit them in the future in tackling new challenges in the production of high-quality products.

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Reports

Measurements of the characteristics of foal meat

Published:

03/07/2019

Authors:

Eva Margrét Jónudóttir, Guðjón Þorkelsson, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir

Supported by:

Agricultural Productivity Fund

contact

Eva Margrét Jónudóttir

Researcher

evamargret@matis.is

Measurements of the characteristics of foal meat

Domestic horsemeat sales are only about half of production, and while meat consumption is growing with increased economic growth, this does not apply to horsemeat. Horses are generally not bred specifically for meat production, but the meat is a by-product of equestrian breeding and drug production from mare's blood. The popularity of equestrianism and the production of medicines are unlikely to decline in the next few years, so there is every reason to make horsemeat high and thus prevent further marketing problems in the future. Horse meat has been in a marketing campaign abroad in recent months, especially in Asia, but information is lacking about its characteristics. The main goal of the project was to gather and disseminate information that supports and facilitates the way of marketing and sales of horsemeat. Products from three foals slaughtered on 03.12.18 were examined. Thermostat was placed in the refrigerator and in the innermost muscles of the body. Acid syringes were inserted into their spinal muscles after slaughter. All carcasses were deboned in the slaughterhouse at Hella and weighed according to the division into muscle, processing material, bones and fat. Each muscle was divided into 4 parts. The first was in color measurement, the second in chemical measurement, the third in sensory evaluation and the fourth in surgical measurement and measurement of southern shrinkage. In addition, samples were sent for analysis of bacterial counts as well as Listeria bacteria. It took about 17 hours for acidity to fall into the spinal muscles after slaughter and it took about 24 hours in the refrigerator after slaughter for the carcass to reach a perfect ambient temperature at 5 ° C. Measurements on cooked muscle confirm that foal meat is tender meat. Sequence of increasing surgical force (viscosity) is: Puffs <ball steak <arch muscle <hip stitch <thigh tongue <vertebral muscle <lump <outer thigh <brisket <inner thigh muscle. Southern atrophy during cooking was about 25%. Listeria moinocytogenes was never measured and all samples were below microbial criteria. Flavor was generally low or not measurable but increases proportionally more with increasing intramuscular fat as it lasts during storage. According to color measurements, foal meat is similarly light but slightly redder and yellower than lamb and there was a nuance difference between the muscles. After 14 days of storage, the meat became slightly redder / yellower. Muscles used as whole muscle by carcass are only 34.7% of total dead weight. The raw material is 28.9%, which tells us that the proportion of what is normally used by the drop weight is 63.6%. Horse meat has everything to offer in order to be sold as a high-quality meat product, and there should be nothing to prevent it from making better use of this valuable resource.

The main objective was to gather and disseminate information that will support marketing of equine meat. Meat and offals from three foals were analyzed. Temperature was monitored in chiller and carcasses after slaughter and pH loggers were placed in the loin muscle (m. Longissimus dorsi). Yield was measured by cutting the carcasses into muscles, triminngs, fat and bone the day after slaughter. Each muscle was cut into 4 parts.The first was used for measuring CIELAB L, a, b * color. The second was analyzed for nutritional value. The third was cooked and analyzed for sensory properties and the fourth cooked and analyzed for Warner Bratzler shear force and cooking loss. In addition, samples were submitted for analysis of bacterial numbers as well as Listeria bacteria. It took about 17 hours for the pH to drop in the loin muscles after slaughter and it took about 24 hours for the carcasses to reach chiller temperature of 5 ° C. Shear force analysis confirmed the tenderness of foal meat. Cooking loss was about 25%. Listeria monocytogenes was not detected, and all samples were within acceptable limits for microbial counts. Generally, rancid flavor was little or not detected but increased proportionally with increasing intramuscular fat and storage time. Foal meat is similar to or lighter but more reddish and yellow than lamb met and there are slight differences between muscles. After 14 days of storage, the meat became slightly redder / yellower. Whole muscles were only 34.7% of carcass weight. Meat trimmings were 28.9%. The total yield was therefore 63.5%. Foal meat is a high-quality meat product and there are opportunities to market as such, and also to develop new products from the trimmings.

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Reports

Nordic Center of Excellence Network in Fishmeal and Fish oil

Published:

11/06/2019

Authors:

Marvin Ingi Einarsson, Alfred Jokumsen, Anne Mette Bæk, Charlotte Jacobsen, Søren Anker Pedersen, Tor Andreas Samuelsen, Jóhannes Pálsson, Odd Eliasen, Ola Flesland

Supported by:

AG fund, EUfishmeal

Nordic Center of Excellence Network in Fishmeal and Fish oil

The main objective of this work was to summarize current knowledge on fishmeal and fish oil as well as identify the research needs and create a roadmap for future industry-driven research. The main conclusion was that the quality of raw material, fishmeal and oil are not yet well defined. The real focus by the industry has mainly been limited to nutrients, such as proteins and fats and other components that makeup fishmeal. There has been less focus on the health benefits of dietary contents of fishmeal and oil and the relationship between processing methods and the nutritional and technical properties of fishmeal. In addition, to proactively strengthen the market position and competitiveness, it is crucial for the industry to achieve a common understanding of the needs of their customers in line with a clear profile of the benefits of their products. A communication strategy as well as a research strategy is needed.

Finally, the identity of the industry needs to be clear and transparent to promote a story about the industry to provide a clear and positive image of the industry to be communicated to society. This means, that a communication strategy as well as a research strategy must be established, as there is a lack of communication along the value chain from the industry to the consumers. There is still a lack of understanding by the consumers of why fishmeal is produced, the reasons must be communicated in such a way that it reaches the average consumer.

The industry members are interested in moving forward to sustain the future growth of the industry. Fishmeal and fish oil production has been prosperous for a very long time, but to remain so, cooperation among all stakeholders is crucial for continued progress.

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Reports

Actions for sustainable bioeconomy in the West Nordic region

Published:

01/06/2019

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Bryndís Björnsdóttir

Supported by:

Nordic Atlantic Cooperation (NORA)

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Actions for sustainable bioeconomy in the West Nordic region

The purpose of the West Nordic Bioeconomy Panel is to identify common key issues of importance to the West Nordic region, identify opportunities, advice industry, governments and the public, as well as promote common key issues and policies. The West Nordic Region includes the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Iceland. The goal is to suggest a sound strategy for the West Nordic region in order to maintain and strengthen its bioeconomy, as well as to communicate that strategy. The West Nordic Bioeconomy Panel was identified as an action in the final report “Future Opportunities for Bioeconomy in the West Nordic Countries” (Smáradóttir et al, 2015). The work of the West Nordic Bioeconomy panel is being funded by the Nordic Atlantic Cooperation (NORA). Further information can be found at www.wnbioeconomy.com. This document outlines the following identified five strategic priorities and proposed related key actions by the West Nordic Bioeconomy panel and stakeholder platforms, with the aim of enhancing innovation and long term sustainable value creation within the regions bioeconomy.

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