Reports

The effects of food container depth on the quality and yield of superchilled and iced Atlantic salmon

Published:

01/09/2018

Authors:

Rúnar Ingi Tryggvason, Magnea Karlsdóttir, Björn Margeirsson, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

AVS R&D Fund (R 17 016-17), Technology Development Fund (164698-1061), The Icelandic Student Innovation Fund (185693- 0091)

contact

Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir

Sensory evaluation manager

adalheiduro@matis.is

The effects of food container depth on the quality and yield of superchilled and iced Atlantic salmon

The aim of the project was to compare the quality of farmed salmon, which was frozen and supercooled, and stored in different packaging solutions. Different insulated pots (32, 42 and 60 cm deep) and EPS boxes were used to transport and store the farmed salmon. Quality was examined after 4, 10 and 14 days of storage in supercooled conditions, where water loss, texture, boiling efficiency and sensory evaluation factors were assessed. Water loss on supercooled salmon was significantly more in deeper packaging compared to shallower packaging after 10 to 14 days of storage at -1 ° C. Frozen salmon stored in EPS lost less water than supercooled salmon in EPS, probably due to inaccurate temperature control during supercooling. Sensory evaluation, texture measurements and boiling efficiency showed little difference between salmon stored in different depths of packaging. Icebergs were more visible in frozen salmon stored in deep pots compared to EPS boxes. Discharge was more visible in frozen salmon compared to super-chilled salmon. The results do not exclude the use of deep tanks for the transport and storage of fresh salmon, but do not specify the maximum size of packaging. The size and volume utilization of packaging affects water loss and transport costs. Supercooling can have many benefits for manufacturers and consumers, but it is necessary to have good control of the supercooling to ensure its effectiveness.

The aim of the study was to compare quality differences of farmed Atlantic salmon, both iced and superchilled, that was stored in different sized packaging solutions. Different sized insulated containers (32, 42 and 60 cm deep) as well as EPS boxes were used to transport and store the fish. The quality was evaluated after 4, 10 and 14 days of storage, where drip loss, texture, cooking yield and sensory evaluation were performed. Increased container depth significantly increased the drip loss of superchilled salmon during 10 to 14 days storage at -1 ° C. Iced storage of salmon in EPS resulted in less drip loss compared to superchilled salmon stored in EPS, most likely due to uncontrolled superchilling conditions. Sensory evaluation, texture analysis and cooking yield did not reveal any major differences between salmon stored in containers of different depths. In case of iced salmon, pressure marks were more prominent with increased depth of containers. Gap was more noticeable in iced salmon compared to superchilled salmon. The results did not rule out the use of large insulated containers, but they do not specify the maximum recommended depth of containers intended for salmon packaging. The size and volume of packaging containers affect drip loss as well as transportation costs. Superchilling of fresh foods can have many benefits for producers and consumers but a controlled and optimized superchilling process is needed to ensure its effectiveness.

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