News

Whitefish processing and land farming benefit from work in the Accelwater project

Last week, a project meeting took place in Spain in the collaborative project Accelwater, in which Matís participates. Two project managers from Matís, Sæmundur Elíasson and Hildur Inga Sveinsdóttir, attended the meeting and presented, among other things, the aspects of the project they have worked on.

The Accelwater project is about accelerating the cycle of water in the food and beverage industry across Europe, but the main goal of the project is to use value from water and reduce fresh water consumption during food processing. Numerous food producers and research partners are involved in the project, but Matís leads the work package that relates to Iceland, and here the emphasis is on land processing of whitefish and land farming of salmon. In addition to Matís, the Icelandic participants in the project are the University of Iceland's Faculty of Food and Nutrition, Útgerðarfélag Akureyri and Samherji Fiskeldi.

At the workshop, Hildur and Sæmundur presented the latest news about the Icelandic work package. The main news was about the installation of flow and energy sensors in whitefish processing in order to measure changes and achieve both water and energy savings in the processing. There, a master's student from Denmark is working on his final project around this work.

During the land fire, progress was reviewed in experiments with the utilization of sludge for fertilizer production. There is a system that filters the sludge and results in a mass of dry matter that can be used, among other things, in biogas or fertilizer. Experiments with dry bleeding of salmon and the possible use of salmon blood for value creation were also reviewed.

Finally, the results of the life cycle analysis, which is being worked on with the University of Iceland, were reviewed. The water use and environmental impact of the aquaculture industry and feed production are currently being analyzed there using the methodology of life cycle analysis.

In addition to this presentation, partners in the project located in Spain were visited. The meat processing company BETA was visited and the conditions were examined, but they are working to convert waste from the processing into value. MAFRICA's meat processing plant was also visited and they could see the waste treatment process developed in the Accelwater project. The waste/pig excrement is then put through a water purification process and a biogas plant, and the result is reusable water and energy, among other things in the form of biogas.

At the end of the trip, they had the opportunity to see the beautiful Montserrat mountain.

More information about the Accelwater project can be found here: Accelwater: Accelerating Water Circularity in Food and Beverage Industrial Areas around Europe

News

Fresh fish for weeks with dry embrittlement

Fish news recently published an article discussing an exciting project that was worked on at Matís in collaboration with chef Dóra Svavarsdóttir and it was about experiments with dry emaciation or so-called dry-age effect on fish which is considered promising.  

The article talks to Dóra, who worked on the research project together with Cecile Dargentolle, project manager in the field of value chain at Matís, specializing in fish. The dry-age method of action is well known and has been applied to meat to make it softer and more tender, but in this study it was used on fish to keep it fresh longer and the texture becomes firmer.

In the project, experiments were carried out with whole fish but also with fish fillets. They specifically looked at one white fish species and one oily freshwater species and chose haddock and char. The goal was to find the right temperature and humidity to increase the shelf life of the fish in a completely controlled environment.

With this dry-age effect, it is not at all a case of dried fish, like hard fish, or that the fish will be shriveled, as there is no fermentation involved. The result is fresh fish that is cooked in the traditional way and can become an exciting ingredient for a variety of restaurants.

The project was carried out with a grant from the Food Fund, and they are now aiming to apply for a grant for a follow-up project in order to conduct further research and prepare guidelines for this method of action for different types of fish, which would then be accessible to more people.

The article can be read in its entirety on the Fiskifretta website here: An experiment with dry emaciation of fish is said to be promising

News

A new circular economy project is off to a good start

On the 5th-6th Last February, the kick-off meeting of the BIO2REG project took place. The project aims to transform large industrial areas into a circular economy.

Jülich Forschungszentrum in Germany leads the project and there are a total of 9 participants, including Matís. Iceland's role is to hold a specialized workshop or so-called Expert Workshop in this country where we present, together with our partners from RISE in Sweden, what has gone well in Iceland when it comes to adopting a circular economy and what should be avoided. 

The organization of the project, the role of each participant and what is to be done in the coming months and years were reviewed at the meeting. BIO2REG will pave the way for economic operators to actively initiate and shape the transition to environmentally friendly production based on a region-to-region approach. There are exciting times ahead and we are very much looking forward to having foreign experts visit the Expert Workshop at the beginning of September.

Matís project site: BIO2REG: Transformation of industrial areas into a circular economy

Project page of the project (in English): BIO2REG

News

Impact of the NextGenProteins project

The NextGenProteins project ended at the end of 2023. It is the largest project that has ever been funded by Matís, and work on it lasted from 2019. One of the final products of the project is brochure where the main results of each part of the project are reviewed and it is now available as a pdf. form on the NextGenProteins website.

The NextGenProteins project was funded by the Horizon 2020 fund and aimed to develop, optimize and optimize the production of three sustainably produced neoproteins, and validate their use in various foods and feeds. The proteins that were examined in the project were insect proteins made from by-products of food production, a single-cell protein that is a yeast mass that thrives on sugars from forestry products, and microalgae that are grown largely on CO2 emissions from geothermal energy production.

The aim of the project was, among other things, to examine the government's regulations and policies when it comes to new protein sources, analyze production obstacles and submit strategic proposals to simplify and change the government's regulations and policies towards a more sustainable food system. NextGenProteins also aimed to produce high-quality, safe, nutritious and sustainable protein sources by utilizing industrial by-products that are traditionally wasted.

Vegetable buns with single-cell protein (torula) produced in collaboration with chef Grím.

Research and experiments were carried out to examine the possibilities of using these proteins in various food products and animal feed. Market research and consumer surveys were also carried out as well as sensory evaluation of products containing the new proteins. The sustainability of new protein sources was also examined and compared to more traditional protein sources as well as their environmental and economic impact, production efficiency and resource utilization.

All the main goals of the NextGenProteins project were achieved and such success can pave the way for innovation and new solutions to the challenges facing the current world food system. The production of the proteins examined in the project has less negative environmental impact than most traditional protein production. It is important to take that factor into account when thinking about how to meet the increased demand for protein production along with increased population growth in the world.

In the attached booklet, which is in English, the supervisors of each part of the project review the main results. In addition, Birgir Örn Smárason, professional manager at Matís and project manager of NextGenProteins, tells about his experience of the project work and its outcome.

The NextGenProteins project page is available here: NextGenProteins – Development of next generation proteins from underutilized resources for use in food and feed

Reports

Processing utilization of abalone roe

Authors:

Gunnar Þórðarson, Jónas R. Viðarsson, James Kennedy and Axel Helgason.

Contact

Gunnar Þórðarson

Regional Manager

gunnar.thordarson@matis.is

View report

Reports

100% fish in the Great lakes region: Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) full utilization

Published:

30/11/2022

Authors:

Cécilie Dargontolle and Jónas Viðarsson

Supported by:

Islenski Sjávarklassinn ehf.

Contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Director of Business and Development

jonas@matis.is

View report

Peer-reviewed articles

Development of a responsive fisheries management system for the Portuguese crustacean bottom trawl fishery: Lessons learned.

Contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Director of Business and Development

jonas@matis.is

A prototype for a Responsive Fisheries Management System (RFMS) was developed in the context of the European FP7 project EcoFishMan and tested on the Portuguese crustacean trawl fishery. Building on Results Based Management principles, RFMS involves the definition of specific and measurable objectives for a fishery by the relevant authorities but allows resource users the freedom to find ways to achieve the objectives and to provide adequate documentation. Taking into account the main goals of the new Common Fisheries Policy, such as sustainable utilization of the resources, end of discards and unwanted catches, a management plan for the Portuguese crustacean trawl fishery was developed in cooperation with the fishing industry, following the process and design laid out in the RFMS concept. The plan considers biological, social and economic goals and assigns a responsibility for increased data collection to the resource users. The performance of the plan with regard to selected indicators was evaluated through simulations. In this paper the process towards a RFMS is described and the lessons learned from the interaction with stakeholders in the development of an alternative management plan are discussed.

Peer-reviewed articles

Is Europe ready for a results-based approach to fisheries management? The voice of stakeholders

Contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Director of Business and Development

jonas@matis.is

The reformed Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), adopted by the European Union in 2013, aims to achieve sustainable exploitation of marine resources. Beyond the mainstream of stakeholders' engagement, the literature increasingly calls for shared accountability in fisheries management. In such scenarios, identifying stakeholders' insights becomes critical for a successful design of innovative management approaches. This paper analyzes how the stakeholders perceive a results-based management system for four fisheries in different European sea-basins as well as at a pan-European level. The results indicate a need for adaptive spirit participatory management approaches, building on regional adaptations within transparent and plural frameworks for fisheries. To succeed, the system should explicitly address its associated public and private costs; neither participation nor accountability comes for free.

News

By-products of horticulture can become raw materials for valuable products

Horticultural farms produce a huge amount of by-products that can be used in a variety of productions. Leaves can be used in spice mixes and fiber can be extracted from them to be added to foods. Antioxidant activity was measured in various by-products and it was found that rose cuttings can be used in cosmetics such as facial creams. This is stated in the recently published final report of the project Valorisation of side streams from Icelandic horticulture which Matís led and finished at the end of 2023. The project was carried out in collaboration with the Farmers' Association of Iceland and Orkídea with a grant from the Food Fund.

The aim of the project was to explore the possibility of using diverse by-products from gardening as ingredients for food, nutritional supplements or cosmetics. The side products under investigation were cucumber and tomato leaves, leaves of outdoor cauliflower and broccoli as well as leaves and stems from floriculture. It was also examined whether the use of second-class carrots and potatoes could be improved. All this was studied with a view to increasing the value of vegetable production, improving utilization and increasing sustainability.

Nutritious leaves and low heavy metal concentration

It was surprising how much various nutrients were measured in the side products. Significant amounts of fiber were measured in leaves, stems and carrot grass. The diet of Icelanders often contains too little fiber, but it would be possible to use these substances to improve it. The by-products were generally found to be rich in minerals, particularly potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium and iron. Heavy metals were not measurable or their concentrations were extremely low. These results encourage the utilization of by-products in food. When using new products for food, however, food safety must always be considered, as some plants contain unwanted natural substances to protect the plant. When plant parts have not previously been used for human consumption, it is necessary to check which rules apply to food.

Premium raw materials with the right processing methods

In the project, freeze drying was used to pre-process the raw material for various product development. For example, a special spice mix containing freeze-dried leaves of cauliflower and broccoli was created for meatballs to improve both the taste and wholesomeness of minced meat. The product concept is that the consumer only needs to mix one portion of spice mixture against 600 grams of raw mince and one egg, then it is possible to form buns and fry. This is a simple, nutritious and tasty dish with very little effort. 

Deep-fried carrot strips could be a premium product to top off fancy dishes, as a snack or side dish. In the project, experiments were carried out with this processing method, and lightly salted, deep-fried beet strips turned out to be the most delicious. The taste was roasted/roasted, slightly bitter and reminiscent of coffee bean notes. The texture was crispy and the taste extremely delicious. Comparable products on the market are, for example, fried onions and potato straws (pik-nik).

Rose petals and branches with unexpected functions

Exciting opportunities lie in the use of rose petals and rose branches in skin care products, as the antioxidant activity is high in these side products of gardening that are usually thrown away. Rose leaves and branches had the highest antioxidant activity compared to leaves of cauliflower, broccoli, tomato and cucumber. It is therefore an extremely interesting future project to create skin care products with this ingredient and to better measure the effectiveness and conduct consumer tests.

A report on the results of the study can be accessed in its entirety on Matís' website here: Valorisation of side streams from Icelandic horticulture

News

Managers and stakeholders in the fishing industry and aquaculture meet in Bergen

Contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Director of Business and Development

jonas@matis.is

Since 2005, the North Atlantic Seafood Forum (NASF) has been an annual event where managers and stakeholders in the fishing industry and aquaculture meet in Bergen to learn about the main innovations and compare books. This time, NASF will be held on March 5-7. and about 1000 people are expected to attend the event. 

This March, NASF will be held for the 19th time, and then managers, investors, equipment manufacturers and other stakeholders in the fishing industry and aquaculture will flock to Bergen to attend the conference. The program this year is looking particularly exciting and has been published on the conference's website nor-seafood.com. The program is divided into 20 seminars and around 200 presentations will be held.

As often before, Icelandic companies and individuals occupy a large place in the program. In recent years, fewer people have come to NASF than they want to, as this is a unique opportunity to meet all the key managers and influencers in the fisheries and aquaculture industry in one place, and hear about the latest developments in the industry. Accommodation in Bergen is going fast during the event, so we encourage people to register early. Registration is taking place here.

Those who want to learn more about the event can contact jonas@matis.is or by phone 4225107.

EN