Reports

Undesirable substances in seafood - results from the Icelandic marine monitoring activities in the year 2019

Published:

31/01/2020

Authors:

Sophie Jensen, Natasa Desnica, Branka Borojevic, Svanhildur Hauksdóttir, Helga Gunnlaugsdóttir

Supported by:

Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture, Iceland

contact

Sophie Jensen

Project Manager

sophie.jensen@matis.is

Results of continuous monitoring of undesirable substances in seafood from the resource 2019 / Undesirable substances in seafood - results from the Icelandic marine monitoring activities in the year 2019

This report summarizes the results obtained in 2019 for the screening of various undesirable substances in the edible part of Icelandic marine catches.

The main aim of this project is to gather data and evaluate the status of Icelandic seafood products in terms of undesirable substances and to utilize the data to estimate the exposure of consumers to these substances from Icelandic seafood and risks related to public health. The surveillance program began in 2003 and was carried out for ten consecutive years before it was interrupted. The project was revived in March 2017 to fill in gaps of knowledge regarding the level of undesirable substances in economically important marine catches for Icelandic export. Due to financial limitations the surveillance now only covers screening for undesirable substances in the edible portion of marine catches for human consumption and not feed or feed components. The limited financial resources have also required the analysis of PAHs, PBDEs and PFCs to be excluded from the surveillance, providing somewhat more limited information than in 2013. However, it is considered a long-term project where extension and revision is constantly necessary. 

In general, the results obtained in 2019 were in agreement with previous results on undesirable substances in the edible part of marine catches obtained in the monitoring years 2003 to 2012 and 2017 & 2018.

In this report from the surveillance program, the maximum levels for dioxins, dioxin-like PCBs and non-dioxin-like PCBs in foodstuffs (Regulation No 1259/2011) were used to evaluate how Icelandic seafood products measure up to limits currently in effect.

The results show that with regard to the maximum levels set in the regulation, the edible parts of Icelandic seafood products contain negligible amounts of dioxins, dioxin like and non-dioxin-like PCBs. In fact, all samples of seafood analyzed in 2019 were below EC maximum levels.

Furthermore, the concentration of ICES6-PCBs was found to be low in the edible part of the marine catches, compared to the maximum limits set by the EU (Commission Regulation 1259/2011).

The results also revealed that the concentrations of heavy metals, eg cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) in the edible part of marine catches were in all samples, except one, well below the maximum limits set by the EU .

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Reports

Nordic information and communication network regarding safety of seafood products. Final Report

Published:

01/03/2007

Authors:

Helga Gunnlaugsdóttir, Björn Auðunsson

Supported by:

NSK (Strategy Reserve), NEF (Nordic Officials' Committee for Fisheries Policy), IFL

Nordic information and communication network regarding safety of seafood products. Final Report

This report is the final report in the Nordic information and communication network project regarding the safety of seafood products, which began in 2005 and was formally completed at the end of 2006. The project developed a joint Nordic website (www.seafoodnet.info) which gathers in one place relevant links containing information on the chemical content of marine products, both undesirable substances and also nutrients. Iceland (first the Fisheries Research Institute and then Matís ohf) was responsible for developing the website and maintaining it, but each country is responsible for its information and for updating it. The project was formally completed at the end of 2006, when the website had just been moved to a new content management system, Eplica, which simplifies all web management and also makes it easier for visitors to find the content they are looking for. It is hoped that these will enable the web to stay "alive" with little effort and cost.

This report is the final report in a Nordic project called “Nordic information and communication network regarding safety of seafood products and utilization of the resources from the sea”. The report contains a summary of the activities in the projects after the 2nd workshop in the project, which was held in Copenhagen, Denmark on April 21st 2006 until the project formally ended at the end of 2006. During this period the website was transferred into a new web content management system called Eplica product suite, which makes administering much easier than in the earlier version and accessing the website much more user-friendly. This was done in accordance with agreements reached at the workshop in Copenhagen. Although the project has formally ended, it is hoped that the seafoodnet.info website will continue to live for some time to come, as a common database or co-ordination of information and reporting of chemical substances, ie nutrients and undesirable substances in seafood. Furthermore, it was hoped that the project would be a cornerstone for further networking and innovative transnational research with the participation of scientists in the Nordic countries and EU.

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