Reports

Influence of seasonal variation and frozen storage temperature on the lipid stability of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus)

Published:

01/12/2016

Authors:

Paulina E. Romotowska, Magnea G. Karlsdóttir, María Gudjónsdóttir, Hörður G. Kristinsson, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund (R 040-12)

Influence of seasonal variation and frozen storage temperature on the lipid stability of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus)

The effect of the storage temperature (-18 ° C vs. 25 ° C) and the fishing season (August vs. September) on the decomposition of fat in Atlantic mackerel caught off the coast of Iceland were examined in this project. Fat stability was assessed by measuring first-stage (PV) and second-degree evolution (TBARS), free fatty acids (FFA) and fatty acid composition. The results show a significant difference in fat degradation with long-term storage, as the degradation was significantly less when stored at -25 ° C compared to -18 ° C. In addition, fish were caught in September with a higher development value compared to fish from August. On the other hand, the most enzymatic fat breakdown was higher in August than in September. The results also indicated that the amount of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was fairly stable throughout the storage period. In other words, the results showed that the temperature in the cold store had a great effect on fat breakdown, but the stability depended on when the fish was caught.

Lipid deterioration of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) caught in Icelandic waters was studied, as affected by different frozen storage temperatures (-18 ° C vs. -25 ° C) and seasonal variation (August vs. September). The lipid stability was investigated by analyzes of hydroperoxide value (PV), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), free fatty acids, as well as changes in fatty acid composition. Results showed significant lipid deterioration with extended storage time, where the lower storage temperature showed significantly more protective effects. Furthermore, a higher lipid oxidation level was recorded for fish caught in September than in August, although lipid hydrolysis occurred to be greater for fish in August than in September. Moreover, results indicated a rather stable level of omega-3 fatty acid during the entire frozen storage period. The analysis indicated that both lipid oxidation and hydrolysis were affected by the frozen storage temperature and the stability differed with regards to season of catch.

Report closed until 01.01.2018

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Reports

Effect of brining and frozen storage on physicochemical properties of well-fed Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) intended for hot smoking and canning

Published:

01/12/2015

Authors:

Paulina E. Romotowska, María Gudjónsdóttir, Magnea G. Karlsdóttir, Sigurjón Arason, Ásbjörn Jónsson, Hörður G. Kristinsson, Telma B. Kristinsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund (R 040-12)

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Effect of brining and frozen storage on physicochemical properties of well-fed Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) intended for hot smoking and canning

Mackerel (Scomber scombrus) is a relatively new species off the coast of Iceland. As mackerel is a fatty fish with a short shelf life, it therefore requires maximization of storage conditions and processing processes. In this project, changes in the chemical and physical properties of the heat treatment of salted and unsalted mackerel were studied. Prior to processing, the fish was stored for 6, 9 and 12 months at -18 ° C and -25 ° C with a view to examining how well Icelandic frozen mackerel is suitable as a raw material in canned and hot-smoked products. To examine the effect of heat treatment on the processing properties of mackerel, the samples were heated to 75 ° C (to simulate smoking) and 90 ° C (to simulate canning). Prolonged storage in the freezer had a negative effect on the raw material due to increased development and the fish stored at -18 ° C had a significantly poorer quality compared to fish stored at -25 ° C before processing. The results showed that a product heated to 75 ° C had a higher water content, higher water resistance and higher utilization and was also higher compared to a product heated to 90 ° C. Overall, the results indicate that a fat summer marker could be well suited for the processing of canned and hot-smoked products.

Atlantic Mackerel (Scomber scombrus) is a novel species in Iceland and as a fatty fish with a short shelf-life it requires optimization of storage and processing conditions. Physicochemical changes of brined and un-brined mackerel were analyzed during frozen storage (6, 9, 12 months) at -18 ° C vs. -25 ° C with the aim of investigating the suitability of using well-fed frozen mackerel as raw material for canned and hot-smoked products. Heat treatments to a core temperature of 90 ° C (representing canning) and 75 ° C (representing hot-smoking) were applied. Prolonged frozen storage showed negative effects on the raw material prior to heat processing due to an increased level of lipid oxidation, where fish stored at -18 ° C was of significantly poorer quality than fish stored at -25 ° C. Moreover, the results indicated that heat treatment resulting in a core temperature of 75 ° C showed higher water content, liquid holding capacity, heating yield as well as lower maximum shear force of texture compared to mackerel heated to a core temperature of 90 ° C. Overall, analyzes indicated that the fatty summer mackerel was well suited for the production of canned and hot-smoked products.

Report closed until 01.01.2018

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Reports

Improved quality of herring for human consumption

Published:

01/12/2007

Authors:

Ásbjörn Jónsson, Hannes Hafsteinsson, Irek Klonowski, Valur N. Gunnlaugsson

Supported by:

Nordic Innovation Center

contact

Valur Norðri Gunnlaugsson

Group Leader

valur.n.gunnlaugsson@matis.is

Improved quality of herring for human consumption

Herring is one of the most important fish species in the North Atlantic and the Baltic Sea. Although a large part of the catch goes to human consumption, about 85% of herring is processed into fish oil and flour. There is a general desire to increase the consumption of herring for human consumption. It was important to study the different factors that affect the quality of herring and especially how they are controlled by biological conditions. The main reason for the quality problems in herring is the high content of compounds that promote development, and affect the color and texture changes, as well as the loss of nutrients. Better quality results in increased competition for herring production in the Nordic countries, as well as a positive consumer attitude towards herring products. The main goal of the project was to improve the quality and quantity of herring, for consumption, by researching the quality of the raw material after fishing. Emphasis was placed on quality immediately after fishing and the quality of the raw material after varying periods of frost. Factors such as fishing location and fishing time did not affect the quality of the herring. However, freezing at -20 ° C had a significant effect on the quality of the raw material.

Herring is one of the most important fish species in the North Atlantic and Baltic Sea, with an annual catch exceeding 2 million tonnes. Although a large part of these fish is used for human consumption, as much as 85% of the herring is used for industrial production of fish meal and fish oil. There is a general wish to increase the utilization of herring for human consumption. Thus, it was important to study the various parameters which influence the quality of herring, and in particular how these paramenters are controlled by biological factors. A major reason behind quality problems arising during post-harvest handling of herring is its high content of compounds that efficiently catalyzes the development of rancidity, pigmentation, texture changes and loss of nutritional value. Improved quality will result in increased competitiveness of the Nordic fish processing industry and would improve the attitude among consumers towards herring products. The general objective of the project was to improve the quality and quantity of herring to be used for food production by investigating how natural variation in raw material characteristics affects post-harvest quality. Attention was given to the quality immediately after landing and the quality after period of frozen storage. The results indicated no clear differences in the quality of herring regarding catching place or season. The frozen storage for a prolonged time had the major influence on the quality of herring fillets.

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