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Torula yeast meal in feed for Atlantic salmon, effects on growth and gut microbiota

The scientific article "Torula yeast in the diet of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and the impact on growth performance and gut microbiome." was recently published by the scientific journal Scientific Reports, which is published by Nature. The effects of Torula yeast meal on the growth performance and gut microbiome of farmed salmon were investigated, where conventional proteins in feed were replaced by yeast meal. The results may surprise you.

With the rapid growth of salmon farming, the need to find and develop suitable substitutes for traditional protein sources in feed increases. Torula yeast flour (Candida utilis) has been defined as a neoprotein (e. Alternative Protein) which can replace traditional protein in feed. The yeast can be grown sustainably. This study examined the effects of yeast meal on growth performance and gut microbiota in freshwater Atlantic salmon. Feed containing protein from seafood, eg fishmeal, as well as mixed marine and plant protein where conventional proteins were replaced by increased amounts of yeast meal (0%, 10%, 20%) were tested.

This study showed that during the growth stage of freshwater salmon, yeast meal can partially replace traditional proteins in compound feed, but that the optimal amount of intake depends on the total composition of the feed and the types of proteins being replaced. In the feed containing seafood protein, this study revealed that 20% yeast meal can be added to the feed without altering growth performance and with potential benefits to the gut microbiota such as an increase in some lactic acid bacteria.

In comparison, in the feed combining seafood protein and plant protein, 10% yeast meal content supports better growth performance than conventional proteins. At the higher intake level, 20%, there was no growth benefit and potentially adverse changes in gut microbiota, such as a decrease in lactic acid bacteria and an increase in bacterial abundance associated with slower growth in other salmonids.

Find out more about these interesting results and read the full scientific article here

Birgir Örn Smárason professional manager at Matís and Sigurlaug Skírnisdóttir project manager at Matís, are among the authors of the article, for more information you can contact them at the following email addresses birgir@matis.is and sigurlaug.skirnisdottir@matis.is

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