Reports

Improved utilization of marine catch

Published:

01/02/2010

Authors:

Sjöfn Sigurgísladóttir, Sveinn Margeirsson, Sigurjón Arason, Jónas R. Viðarsson

Supported by:

Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Improved utilization of marine catch

This report is prepared for the Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture; and it is mainly intended as a contribution to the Ministry's work in reviewing the policy regarding the utilization of marine catch. The content of the report can be divided into two main components, i.e. in the first part, a status assessment is made of the utilization and value creation of cod catches with regard to sea freezing, land processing and container exports; but in the second part, an attempt is made to identify where the main opportunities are for improved utilization and increased value creation in the Icelandic catfish catch. When collecting data, the main catch and disposal reports of the Directorate of Fisheries and Statistics Iceland's export data for the years 2007 and 2008 were sought. however, the authors of the report recommend that this be done as soon as all the data is available. In 2008, Icelandic vessels caught about 151 thousand tonnes of cod (127 thousand tonnes gutted) from which 90 thousand tonnes of products were processed to a value of ISK 59.5 billion (fob). About 75% of the catch went to land processing, 20% was frozen at sea and over 5% was exported unprocessed in containers. The data show that there was a significant difference between utilization figures in land and sea production, i.e. fillet utilization, head utilization and utilization of by-products were significantly poorer in the freezer trawler fleet. Roughly estimated utilization in land processing was about 72% (mass ratio of raw materials and products compared to gutted) versus 44% in sea freezing. There may be various reasons for the fact that the utilization of catch from freezer vessels is much poorer than in land-based processing, but it is clear that there are significant opportunities to increase utilization of the freezer trawler fleet. As an example of where utilization could be increased, it can be mentioned, for example, that the head utilization of fillet freezer trawlers is generally 35.5%, while in fillet processing on land it is 22-30%; and the overwhelming majority of trawlers are also unable to bring their heads ashore. There are also various indications that it would be possible to bring more other by-products into the country than is currently the case, such as cuttings, marrow, liver, eggs, eggs, etc. Much has been achieved regarding utilization in land processing in recent months, but there are still opportunities for improvement. The greatest progress in improved utilization has taken place in the processing of cod products, but the utilization of by-products in the processing of other species has not been able to keep up, as most of the cod is being slaughtered. For example, there has been a satisfactory development in the last three years in liver canning, which has doubled in volume since 2006-2009. A large amount of fish is exported unprocessed in containers every year, but high fish prices in the markets in the UK and Germany mean that shipowners see greater hope of profit in sending the fish out of the country than selling it for domestic processing. It is possible to increase the export value of part of this catch by processing it here at home. Although improved utilization is important, it must not be forgotten that quantity and quality do not always go hand in hand, so it is no less important to maximize the proportion of products that go into the most expensive product categories. In order for this to be the case, proper handling and process management must be ensured throughout the entire value chain, as quality is maximized at all stages of fishing, processing and transport.

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Reports

Attitudes and fish consumption of young people: Improving the image of seafood

Published:

01/01/2007

Authors:

Gunnþórunn Einarsdóttir, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir, Emilía Martinsdóttir, Friðrik H. Jónsson, Inga Þórsdóttir, Fanney Þórsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

contact

Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir

Project Manager

kolbrun.sveinsdottir@matis.is

Attitudes and fish consumption of young people: Improving the image of seafood

The aim of the project was to gather information on the attitudes and consumption of fish by young people. The report describes the results of an attitude and consumption survey among people aged 17-26 and data were collected in two ways in 2006. Information from Statistics Iceland showed that 61.5% people at this age were in school and the survey was submitted to that group. in lessons. A total of 800 upper secondary school students and 399 university students were reached. From a random sample of 2,300 working people (100% employment rate) aged 17-26 from Statistics Iceland, 2252 received the questionnaire by post. A total of 536 (24%) responded to the online survey. A total of 1735 respondents out of 2000 (86.7%) were initially targeted. The questionnaire can be divided into ten parts. The first part asked about attitudes towards health and food categories. The next part asked about fish consumption, consumption of fish species, various foods and the purchase of fish. The third part asked about the taste of different fish dishes. They were asked what was most important when buying fish in the fourth part. The fifth part asked about factors that affect fish consumption. In the sixth part, the assumptions of fish consumption were assessed, ie. inspiring and discouraging elements. The seventh asked about external influences on fish consumption. In the eighth part, knowledge of the nutritional value and handling of fish was assessed. The ninth part examined where consumers get information about fish and the trust they place in such information. Finally, the background of the interviewees was asked. The questions were analyzed in terms of gender, age, education, place of residence, number of children under the age of 18 in the household, whether the individuals had children or not and household income. On average, young people aged 17-26 eat fish as a main course 1.3 times a week or about five times a month, which is well below the recommended level. It was found that eating habits in childhood have a formative effect on people's fish consumption and also residence, on the one hand in the capital area and the countryside as well as living abroad at a young age. People aged 17-26 seem to have been brought up with fish consumption, which has a significant effect on their fish consumption. It was also found that the proportion of these people who have left home eat the least amount of fish. Those who live in the countryside do not have fish shops or fresh fish tables in the supermarkets in their area and therefore do not have as many fish dishes to choose from in the shops and rather eat traditional fish types and dishes. Fish balls, grated fish and boiled fish, all of which can be considered rather traditional dishes, seem to suit the tastes of a certain group of consumers. The second group prefers so-called hidden fish (light sauce, thick sauce, stew and oven-baked dishes), and the third group prefers exotic dishes (Mexican, tropical, Indian and Japanese). However, there are some gender differences in attitudes and men answer that they are less for healthy food, fish, vegetables, pasta dishes but are more for meat and fast food than women. Women are more for fish and enjoy the food better with fish than without it. They are still generally less for food but like to cook food more. The family is a strong influence on fish consumption, it is most sought after for information and most trusted. Young people seem to trust scientists to provide reliable information, but little is sought for information. The information that young people receive comes largely from the internet and other media. Scientists need to make greater use of this in disseminating information that is relevant to the public.

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