Reports

Consumer survey on salted fish

Published:

30/08/2019

Authors:

Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir

Supported by:

AG Fisk, AVS Research Fund

contact

Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir

Sensory evaluation manager

adalheiduro@matis.is

Consumer survey on salted fish

There is a long tradition for processing salted fish in this country, but before that the salt was used primarily to extend the shelf life of the fish. Today, salted fish is considered a gourmet product that is very popular in many parts of the world, not least in Southern Europe, where the traditions and quality of Icelandic salted fish play a major role. Matís ran workshops with salted fish producers and chefs in April and May 2019. Their goal was, among other things, to assess the position of salted fish in the domestic market. It was stated that information was needed on Icelanders' views on salted fish in order to better assess the opportunities in Iceland. Based on the results of the workshops, an online survey was conducted with the aim of researching the image of salted fish products in the minds of Icelanders, general knowledge of salted fish and its history, and the experience of salted fish. The consumption frequency of salted fish, lightly salted fish and night-salted fish was also examined, as well as attitudes towards salted fish compared to lightly salted and night-salted fish. The survey was conducted in May 2019 and was published by 17,000 Facebook users, 18 years and older. A total of 505 people completed the survey.

There was a big difference in the participants' answers according to age. The results show that consumption of both fish and salted fish decreases with decreasing age. Only about 29% participants aged 18-29 eat salted fish once a year or more often than the corresponding proportion for the oldest group, 60-70 years, is about 94%. The main reason why participants do not eat salted fish is that they do not like it. Other reasons are that it is too salty, lack of supply, that there is little tradition for salted fish, and that fresh fish is preferred. In general, attitudes towards salted fish were quite positive and the experience of those who have bought salted fish in a restaurant, fish shop and grocery store was good. However, younger participants are generally more negative about salted fish and more likely to find the taste of salted fish bad than older ones. Knowledge and interest in salted fish also decreases with decreasing age, and the same applies to the purchase frequency of salted fish, lightly salted fish and night-salted fish. The results indicate that the taste of salted fish varies according to age. Older participants are more likely to want salted fish well salted and find it less salty than younger ones.

Saltfish has been intertwined with Icelandic history and food culture for centuries. The results of this survey, however, show declining knowledge, interest and consumption of salted fish in younger age groups. This development can be explained by an increased selection of foods, changed tastes, attitudes and habits. It is likely that the image of salted fish as a quality product will be affected and that great changes are taking place in the consumption of salted fish among Icelanders. In order to promote the consumption of salted fish, it needs to be better promoted and made more visible, not least among younger age groups, whether in canteens, supermarkets, fishmongers or restaurants.

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Reports

Food and sustainable tourism. Summary.

Published:

01/04/2014

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

Technology Development Fund

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Food and sustainable tourism. Summary.

Food and sustainable tourism was a priority and cluster project to promote environmentally friendly food production and food processing in connection with tourism. The project was carried out by public bodies in the business support system, regional development associations and the University of Iceland. The project was carried out in response to a great deal of interest in local food and the environment in connection with the growing activities in tourism. The emphasis was on supporting entrepreneurs in the development of new products and sales channels that benefit tourism in each area. The innovation segment was successful and had a multiplier effect both domestically, nationally and internationally. At the same time, important research was conducted on sustainability criteria, consumer attitudes and quality and shelf life. The communication and communication part of the project was no less important. This report briefly describes the progress of the project and the main conclusions.

Food and Sustainable Tourism was a 3 year collaboration project between academia, R&D institutions and regional development agencies. In the project focus was put on strengthening small scale local food production to encourage sustainability in tourism. The project was executed as a response to rise in interest in local food and environmental issues within tourism. Focus was put on supporting entrepreneurs developing new products and sales channels. Research on sustainability indicators, consumer attitudes and product quality was carried out. 

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Reports

Íslenskt matkorn - Gæði, inhald og viðhör / Icelandic cereal grain crops for food - Quality, chemical composition and consumer view

Published:

01/01/2012

Authors:

Ólafur Reykdal, Þóra Valsdóttir, Þórdís Anna Kristjánsdóttir, Jón Þór Pétursson, Jónatan Hermannsson

Supported by:

Agricultural Productivity Fund, Agricultural University of Iceland

contact

Ólafur Reykdal

Project Manager

olafur.reykdal@matis.is

Íslenskt matkorn - Gæði, inhald og viðhör / Icelandic cereal grain crops for food - Quality, chemical composition and consumer view

From 2009 to 2011, Matís and the Agricultural University of Iceland carried out a project on domestic grain for food production. The project was intended to promote the increased use of domestic cereals in food. For this purpose, quality requirements for barley were compiled and material on internal control was compiled for grain farmers' manuals. Chemical measurements of domestic cereals were also carried out, product development from cereals was supported and consumers' attitudes towards domestic barley were examined. Quality requirements for food barley and barley for brewing are set out and are intended to be a reference in business. A general text on the internal control of cereal growers can be localized for individual farms. According to chemical measurements, the starch in the domestic grain was not significantly different from that measured in imported grain. There was a lot of fiber in the domestic grain. The concentration of heavy metals in grain after the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull was very low.

A project on the use of Icelandic grain crops for food production was carried out at Matis and the Agricultural University of Iceland in 2009 to 2011. The purpose of the project was to support the increasing use of domestic cereal grain crops for food production. To enable this, quality requirements were developed for barley and a handbook on internal control was written for barley processing at a farm. Proximates and inorganic elements were measured, product development was supported and finally the view of consumers towards Icelandic barley was studied. Quality requirements for barley to be used for food and alcoholic drinks were developed as a frame of reference for businesses. The text for internal control can be adapted for individual farms. The starch in Icelandic grain crops was similar to that of imported crops. The Icelandic grain crops were rich in dietary fiber. The concentrations of heavy metals in the Icelandic crops after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption were very low.

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Reports

Attitudes and fish consumption in Iceland 2011

Published:

01/12/2011

Authors:

Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir, Dagný Yrsa Eyþórsdóttir, Gunnþórunn Einarsdóttir, Emilia Martinsdóttir

Supported by:

Student Innovation Fund, Rannís

contact

Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir

Project Manager

kolbrun.sveinsdottir@matis.is

Attitudes and fish consumption in Iceland 2011

The aim of the study was to examine consumption habits and attitudes related to seafood among Icelanders aged 18-80. A survey was set up online and letters were sent to a sample from Statistics Iceland in June 2011 and responses were received from 525 people. The aim was also to examine the changes that have taken place in Icelanders' attitudes and fish consumption since the last figures were published in 2006 for people aged 18-26. Attitudes and consumption of Icelanders were analyzed by gender, age, place of residence, education, monthly household income before tax, number in the household and number of children under 18 in the household. On average, Icelanders eat fish as a main course about twice a week. Haddock is the most popular species on the tables of the people and is consumed about once a week, followed by cod. On average, Icelanders take fish oil about four times a week, but in total about half of Icelanders take fish oil daily and 62% three times a week or more. In general, Icelanders seem to eat fresh but frozen fish more often and very little is bought from prepared fish dishes chilled or frozen. Attitudes towards eating fish are generally very positive and the vast majority consider fish healthy and good. Most people believe that family has the most encouraging effect on fish consumption and that a wider budget, easier access to fresh fish and a wider range of fish could have an effect on increased fish consumption. There is a big difference between fish consumption and the attitudes of men and women. Women prefer to buy food and place more emphasis on hygiene, freshness, accessibility and price. They are also of the opinion that it is expensive to eat fish. There was a significant difference between age groups, both in terms of total fish consumption frequency, consumption of different fish products and attitudes. Fish consumption increases with age, as does fish oil consumption. The emphasis on hygiene is lower among younger people. There was a difference in the consumption behavior and consumption of different fish species and products according to residence, which can probably be largely explained by traditions and different supply of fish. Most people, especially those in the older age group, find it rather expensive to eat fish. On the other hand, they find fish more valuable than younger ones. However, it seems that the youngest group is even willing to pay more for fish, as they are of the opinion that a wider range of ready-made fish dishes and fish dishes in restaurants could have an effect on increased fish consumption. Positive changes have taken place in fish consumption and attitudes of people aged 18-26 in the last five years. This group is now more in favor of fish and the frequency of fish consumption has increased somewhat, which is mainly explained by increased fish consumption outside the home. Consumption of fish oil and diversity in the choice of seafood seems to have increased. In this age group, there has been an increase in the consumption of fresh fish, sushi, salted fish and chilled semi-prepared dishes.

The aim of the study was to investigate seafood consumption and attitudes among 18‐80 year old Icelanders. A total of 525 people completed a web-based survey. The aim was also to study changes in attitudes and fish consumption in the last five years among people 18-26 years. The data were analyzed by gender, age, residence, education, income, number of household members and number of children below 18 years. On average, the fish consumption frequency (fish as main course) is around two times a week. Haddock is the most frequently consumed fish species and is consumed around one time per week. Fish oil is consumed four times a week on average, but 50% of the participants consume fish oil every day. Fresh fish is more frequently consumed than frozen fish and ready fish meals, chilled or frozen, are rarely bought. Attitudes towards consuming fish are generally very positive. Most people consider family to have the most encouraging influence on their fish consumption and that less stringent finances, easier access to fresh fish and more variety of fish could positively influence their fish consumption. Fish consumption pattern and attitudes differ by gender. Women more frequently purchase food and emphasize more healthy food, freshness, access and price. Large differences were found between different age groups, both regarding fish consumption frequency, fish products and attitudes. Fish consumption and fish oil consumption frequency increase with age. Emphasis on healthy food are less among younger people. Consumption habits and consumption of different fish species and products differ by residence around the country. This can largely be explained by different traditions and different fish supply. Most people, especially in older age groups consider it expensive to consume fish. They are, however, more likely to consider fish money worth compared to younger people. The youngest age group appears though to be ready to pay more for fish as their opinion is that more variety of ready fish meals and fish courses at restaurants could positively influence their fish consumption. The last five years, positive changes in fish consumption and attitudes among people 18-26 years have occurred. This group now consumes fish more frequently, the varity in their choice of seafood has increased. The consumption of fresh fish, sushi, salted cod and chilled oven ready fish meals has increased among this group.

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Reports

Product development of healthier processed meat products

Published:

01/08/2009

Authors:

Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Ólafur Reykdal, Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Gunnþórunn Einarsdóttir, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir, Þóra Valsdóttir, Emilia Martinsdóttir, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

Technology Development Fund, Agricultural Productivity Fund

contact

Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir

Sensory evaluation manager

adalheiduro@matis.is

Product development of healthier processed meat products

The goal of the "Healthy Meat Products" project was to develop healthier ready-made meat products with less salt and hard fats. In the product development process, sensory evaluation was used to assess the sensory quality of the products and consumer surveys to check how consumers liked the product. Consumer surveys were conducted both at home and at work. The results of sensory evaluation and consumer surveys were used to decide on changes in the production process to adapt the products to consumer tastes. Microbial and chemical measurements were performed to monitor the shelf life and chemical content of the products. Consumption habits of processed meat products and attitudes towards low-fat and low-salt meat products were studied. The project succeeded in producing fat- and salt-reduced products from three product categories: new meat products, pre-fried meat products and cold cuts. One of those products is now ready for the market. The new product received very good reviews from consumers and even better than the product that was on the market. The other two products have come a long way in product development and the company now has the knowledge and experience to complete that product development and continue with the development of such products. Consumers are generally positive about fat reduction in meat products. However, there is a difference in their answers depending on which product is involved and there is also a difference between the sexes. The vast majority consider low-fat meat products to be healthier than products with a traditional fat content. For consumers, the most important thing is that the product is tasty. Price is also important, but less so. Consumers often make the same quality demands on low-fat and traditional products. Consumers care about the hygiene of meat products but are not willing to replace the taste quality with hygiene. There was a difference in the attitudes of men and women. Women think more about healthy food than men and are more positive about low-fat meat products. They are also more likely to buy low-fat meat products. Women rather than men check whether the product is environmentally friendly. Package information is important. About two-thirds of consumers say they look at fat content when choosing meat products. About half of consumers look at the amount of salt, so it seems that most people care less about the amount of fat. Care must be taken with the labeling and content description of salt and low-fat meat products, as this affects consumers' choices and expectations.

The aim of the project was to develop healthier processed meat products with lower salt and fat content. In the production development process, the sensory attributes of the prototypes were evaluated by a trained sensory panel. Consumer tests were conducted to study the consumer liking of the products. The consumer tests were done in different settings as central location tests and in-home tests. The results from the sensory evaluation and the consumer test were used to make decisions on the next steps in the product development. Microbiological and chemical analysis was performed to estimate the storage life and nutritional status of the products. The consumption pattern and consumer attitudes towards processed meat products with reduced fat- and salt content were studied. In the project the product development of three products in different product categories was successful. One of the products is ready for marketing and consumer tests indicated better liking of this new prototype than of the traditional one. The two other products need further development and the company now has the competence and experience to finalize the development. Consumers are generally in favor of fat-reduced meat products but there is a gender difference and a difference towards different product categories. Most of the consumers believe that fat-reducing meat products are healthier than traditional products. The taste is most important to most consumers and the price is also important. The consumers make the same demands to quality of fat-reduced food as other food. Consumers find the healthiness of food important, but not as important as the taste. Women are more aware of the healthiness of food and they are more positive towards fat-reduce meat products. They are more likely to buy fat reduced food and more aware of environmentally friendly food. The information on the packaging is important. Two thirds of consumers look for the fat content on the food label of the product they buy, but only half of them look at the salt content. Labeling and packaging information is very important as it affects the choice and expectations of the consumers.

Report closed until 01-10-2012

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Reports

Attitudes and fish consumption of young people aged 16 to 20: Intervention in Akureyri Young consumer attitudes and fish consumption: Improved image of seafood

Published:

01/02/2009

Authors:

Gunnþórunn Einarsdóttir, Ása Vala Þórisdóttir, Fanney Þórsdóttir, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir, Emilía Martinsdóttir, Friðrik H. Jónsson, Inga Þórsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund: R020-05

contact

Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir

Project Manager

kolbrun.sveinsdottir@matis.is

Attitudes and fish consumption of young people aged 16 to 20: Intervention in Akureyri Young consumer attitudes and fish consumption: Improved image of seafood

1. The aim of the project "Attitudes and fish consumption of young people: Improving the image of seafood" was, among other things, to obtain information on the attitudes and fish consumption of young people. Here is a summary of the results of a participatory study conducted on young people aged 16-20 years. It was examined whether education about fish and more access to it would result in increased fish consumption and more positive attitudes towards fish.

Method and participants: The study was conducted on students from Menntaskólinn á Akureyri and Verkmenntaskólinn á Akureyri who lived on the student parks Lund. The intervention took place in such a way that the number of fish meals in the canteen was increased by half and educational lectures were held for the students where more than 80 students attended (27%) and a presentation was posted on the website. An opinion and consumption survey was prepared in the form of a questionnaire and presented to the students. The same survey was conducted in the fall of 2006 (n = 225, 75%) before the intervention and in the spring of 2007 (n = 220, 73%) after the intervention. The questionnaire was divided into seven sections: 1. Attitudes towards health and food categories; 2. Fish consumption and consumption of various foods; 3. Taste for fish dishes; 4. Factors affecting fish consumption; 5. Prerequisites for fish consumption; 6. External influencers, 7. Knowledge regarding fish.

Results: The intervention resulted in better knowledge of the fish and fish oil consumption increased by almost half and more in girls than boys. Thirty-two percent of students consumed fish oil daily after the intervention but only 22% before the intervention. Furthermore, 38% consumed fish oil 4-7 times a week after the intervention but only 28% before the intervention. On average, the young people ate fish as a main course 1.8 times a week before the intervention and 1.9 times a week after the intervention, but the difference was not significant. The students' fish consumption is therefore not far from the Public Health Institute's recommendations. In terms of incentives for fish consumption, parents were the strongest influencers, but their influence diminished only after intervention. Students' attitudes towards fish became more negative after the intervention, but despite this, their fish consumption did not decrease. Those who did not have fish before the intervention liked it better after the intervention. Targeted education about both healthy fish and an increased supply of diverse fish dishes are necessary to promote increased fish consumption by young people.

The aim of the project “Young consumer attitudes and fish consumption: Improved image of seafood” was to obtain information on the attitudes of young people towards fish and fish consumption. Results are shown from an interventive research which was carried out on young people of the age group 16-20. It was examined if education about fish and its accessibility would result in increased fish consumption and more positive attitudes towards fish. Method and participants: Students from the college and vocational school at Akureyri participated in the study. The intervention was done by doubling the number of fish meals at the school's canteens and informative lectures were given to over 80 students (27%) and information was given on the school web. The students answered a questionnaire on attitudes and consumption of fish. The same study was done twice; in the autumn 2006 (n = 225, 75%) before the intervention and in spring 2007 (n = 220, 73%) after the intervention The questionnaire was divided into 7 parts: 1. Attitudes towards health and food types; 2. Consumption of fish and other foods; Liking of various fish dishes; 4. Factors affecting fish consumption; 5. Prerequisite of fish consumption; 6. External effects; 7. Knowledge about fish. Results: The intervention resulted in better knowledge about fish and the fish liver oil consumption almost doubled, more among girls than boys. Thirty-two percent of the students consumed fish oil daily after the intervention but only 22% before. Further, 38% consumed fish oil 4-7 times a week after the intervention but only 28% before. On average, the young people consumed fish as a main dish 1.8 times a week before the intervention but 1.9 after, the difference was not significant. The fish consumption of the students is therefore not far from the recommendation of the Public Health Institute of Iceland. The parents had the most influence on encouraging increased fish consumption, but their effect decreased a little after the intervention. The attitudes of the students towards fish became more negative after the intervention but did not however decrease their fish consumption. Those who did not like fish before the intervention liked it better after the intervention. Systematic education on the wholesomeness of fish and increased variety of fish dishes are essential to encourage increased fish consumption among young people.

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Reports

Attitudes and fish consumption of young people: Improving the image of seafood

Published:

01/01/2007

Authors:

Gunnþórunn Einarsdóttir, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir, Emilía Martinsdóttir, Friðrik H. Jónsson, Inga Þórsdóttir, Fanney Þórsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

contact

Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir

Project Manager

kolbrun.sveinsdottir@matis.is

Attitudes and fish consumption of young people: Improving the image of seafood

The aim of the project was to gather information on the attitudes and consumption of fish by young people. The report describes the results of an attitude and consumption survey among people aged 17-26 and data were collected in two ways in 2006. Information from Statistics Iceland showed that 61.5% people at this age were in school and the survey was submitted to that group. in lessons. A total of 800 upper secondary school students and 399 university students were reached. From a random sample of 2,300 working people (100% employment rate) aged 17-26 from Statistics Iceland, 2252 received the questionnaire by post. A total of 536 (24%) responded to the online survey. A total of 1735 respondents out of 2000 (86.7%) were initially targeted. The questionnaire can be divided into ten parts. The first part asked about attitudes towards health and food categories. The next part asked about fish consumption, consumption of fish species, various foods and the purchase of fish. The third part asked about the taste of different fish dishes. They were asked what was most important when buying fish in the fourth part. The fifth part asked about factors that affect fish consumption. In the sixth part, the assumptions of fish consumption were assessed, ie. inspiring and discouraging elements. The seventh asked about external influences on fish consumption. In the eighth part, knowledge of the nutritional value and handling of fish was assessed. The ninth part examined where consumers get information about fish and the trust they place in such information. Finally, the background of the interviewees was asked. The questions were analyzed in terms of gender, age, education, place of residence, number of children under the age of 18 in the household, whether the individuals had children or not and household income. On average, young people aged 17-26 eat fish as a main course 1.3 times a week or about five times a month, which is well below the recommended level. It was found that eating habits in childhood have a formative effect on people's fish consumption and also residence, on the one hand in the capital area and the countryside as well as living abroad at a young age. People aged 17-26 seem to have been brought up with fish consumption, which has a significant effect on their fish consumption. It was also found that the proportion of these people who have left home eat the least amount of fish. Those who live in the countryside do not have fish shops or fresh fish tables in the supermarkets in their area and therefore do not have as many fish dishes to choose from in the shops and rather eat traditional fish types and dishes. Fish balls, grated fish and boiled fish, all of which can be considered rather traditional dishes, seem to suit the tastes of a certain group of consumers. The second group prefers so-called hidden fish (light sauce, thick sauce, stew and oven-baked dishes), and the third group prefers exotic dishes (Mexican, tropical, Indian and Japanese). However, there are some gender differences in attitudes and men answer that they are less for healthy food, fish, vegetables, pasta dishes but are more for meat and fast food than women. Women are more for fish and enjoy the food better with fish than without it. They are still generally less for food but like to cook food more. The family is a strong influence on fish consumption, it is most sought after for information and most trusted. Young people seem to trust scientists to provide reliable information, but little is sought for information. The information that young people receive comes largely from the internet and other media. Scientists need to make greater use of this in disseminating information that is relevant to the public.

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