Reports

Microorganisms for aquaculture sludge enrichment   

Published:

21/12/2023

Authors:

Anna Berg Samúelsdóttir, Matís, Alexandra Leeper, Sjávarklasinn, Clara Jégousse, Sjávarklasinn, Ólafur H. Friðjónsson, Matís, Elísabet Eik Guðmundsdóttir, Matís, Hörður Guðmundsson, Matís and Birgir Örn Smárason, Matís

Supported by:

Hringrásarsjóður

Contact

Anna Berg Samúelsdóttir

Project Manager

annab@matis.is

The main goal of the project "Microbes for the enrichment of aquaculture sludge" was to develop a method for treating side streams from aquaculture (sludge) with microorganisms so that the sludge can be used as fertilizer for agriculture.  

Considering the rapid growth of aquaculture in Iceland, it is crucial for the sustainability of the industry to find solutions for side currents and thus strengthen the circular economy. The implementation of solutions that promote the use of side streams, and promote circulation, are in line with the United Nations' goals for sustainable development. 

The legal framework for the use of fish farm sludge as fertilizer is both extensive and in parts quite complex, i.e. what is allowed and who grants permission. As an example of the requirements for using sludge as fertilizer, sludge must be applied to the pasture before December 1st if the area is to be used for grazing, animals can then be grazed on the area 5 months later or on April 1st at the earliest.  

In the project, work was done to enrich nitrate in the sludge with microorganisms to increase the possibility of using the sludge as a fertilizer. An enrichment culture was established with the aim of enriching ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the sludge. A chemical analysis of the sludge was also carried out to assess its nutrient content. The results of chemical measurements indicate that sludge can be ideal as a supplement or additive to, for example, biodegradable livestock manure. It is important to continue with a project that contributes to increasing the value of by-products such as sludge in order to keep nutrients within the circular economy. The use of sludge as fertilizer is beneficial for both aquaculture companies and Icelandic agriculture.  
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The primary objective of the project "Microorganisms for aquaculture sludge enrichment" was to develop a method for treating side streams from aquaculture (sludge) using microorganisms, thereby rendering the sludge suitable for use as agricultural fertilizer. 

Given the rapid expansion of aquaculture in Iceland, finding solutions for side streams is imperative to sustain the industry and enhance circular economy practices. Implementing solutions that encourage side stream utilization aligns with the United Nations' sustainable development goals. 

The legal landscape for utilizing fish farm sludge as fertilizer is extensive and, in certain aspects, complex, delineating what is permissible and who grants permission. For instance, applying sludge to pasture for grazing requires adherence to specific timelines, such as application before December 1st, with grazing permitted no earlier than 5 months later or on April 1st. 

The project focused on enriching the sludge's nitrogen content with microorganisms. An enrichment culture was established to promote ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the sludge, increasing its potential as a fertilizer. Chemical analysis of the sludge was conducted to evaluate its nutrient content. The results indicate that the sludge can serve as an ideal supplement or additive, for instance, with biodegradable livestock manure. Continuing projects that enhance the value of like sludge is crucial for maintaining nutrient cycles within the circular economy. The use of sludge as fertilizer is mutually beneficial for both aquaculture companies and Icelandic agriculture. 

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Reports

Proceedings from a conference on "Environmental impacts and energy transition in the Nordic seafood sector"

Published:

14/12/2023

Authors:

Jónas R. Viðarsson

Supported by:

AG-fisk (Nordic council of Ministers Working group for Fisheries and Aquaculture)

Contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Director of Business and Development

jonas@matis.is

Fish and other seafood play an important role in ensuring food security, employment and the economy in the world, and especially in the Nordic countries. In addition, seafood of Nordic origin generally comes from sustainably exploited stocks, is particularly healthy for consumption and in most cases has a very limited carbon footprint compared to other protein sources. It can therefore be argued to a certain extent that Nordic seafood is a "sustainable superfood". However, consumers are often not sure if seafood is an environmentally friendly option. The Nordic fishing industry is now faced with the opportunity to take the lead in the energy exchange, and thus be able to boast of offering the best and most environmentally friendly seafood available.

The Working Group on Fisheries and Aquaculture (AG-Fisk) operating within the Nordic Council has identified these opportunities, and as part of Iceland's presidency of the Council in 2023, AG-fisk funded a project designed to promote networking within the Nordic fisheries to increase awareness and share knowledge about past, present and future progress in terms of sustainability and energy transition in the fisheries sector. The highlight of the project was a conference held in Reykjavík on September 13, 2023, but the day before a working meeting was held where opportunities for increased Nordic cooperation were discussed. The conference consisted of 13 talks and about 150 people attended the event, which took place in Harpa. This report contains an overview of the presentations made at the conference. Recordings from the conference are also available at website of the project.
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Seafood is generally a climate-efficient and nutritious type of food. Consumers, however, are often confused as to whether seafood is sustainable or not and what seafood to choose. The Nordic seafood sector now has the opportunity to take the lead in transitioning to low greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency measures and shifting to alternative fuels.

The Working Group for Fisheries and Aquaculture (AG-Fisk) within the Nordic council has recognized this, and as part of Iceland's presidency of the council in 2023, initiated a networking project to raise awareness and share knowledge on past-, present- and future advances in reduction of environmental impacts in Nordic seafood value chains. The highlight of the project was a conference that was held in Reykjavík on 13 September 2023. The conference consisted of 13 presentations and was attended by close to 150 persons. This report contains the proceedings from the conference, representing an abstract of each presentation and the slides presented. Recordings form the conference are also available on the project's webpage.

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Reports

Food in the tourism of the future - Iceland. Discussion paper and summary after workshops with Icelandic stakeholders in February and March 2021

Published:

02/03/2022

Authors:

Editors: Þóra Valsdóttir Matís and Brynja Laxdal Matarauður Íslands Co-authors: Ásta Kristín Sigurjónsdóttir Íslenski ferðaklasinn, Guðrún Þóra Gunnarsdóttir Rannsóknarmiðstöð ferðamála, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir Matís, Laufey Haraldsdóttir Háskólinn á Hólum, Óli Þór Hilmarsson Matís, Rakel Halldórsdóttir Matís, Háma Dnsdóttir, Selma Dnsdóttir, Selma Dnsdóttir - and the Ministry of Innovation, Sunna Þórðardóttir The Ministry of Culture and Commerce, Tjörvi Bjarnason The Icelandic Farmers' Association

Supported by:

Nordic Council of Ministers

Eight Nordic countries are involved in the Nordic Food in Tourism project, which is funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers for the period 2019-2021. in how climate change, consumption changes and other trends can shape the future of food in tourism. The aim is to raise awareness of future challenges and opportunities related to tourism assessment and to provide strategic guidance that supports future action and policy-making in the Nordic countries that is also in line with the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals. The results of the project are based on data analysis, futuristic methods and interviews with experts in collaboration with the consulting company Kairos Future. To explore the challenges and opportunities we face in Iceland regarding food in tourism, an introductory meeting and two workshops were held in February and March 2021 under the auspices of the Nordic Food in Tourism project. Nordic Food in Tourism also participated in three solutions tournaments that were held in Iceland 2020-2021, where solutions were worked on that promote increased sustainability and it was proven that great emphasis was placed on food-related opportunities.

Many suggestions for action were made in the workshops, but in many cases it is unclear who should pull the cart and be responsible for following the suggestions. Proposals were submitted for implementation and partners of actions, but more parties could be involved in their implementation. This document is a summary that reflects the attitudes of the participants in the workshops and the emphases of the participants in the solutions. Furthermore, to this extent, other results from the Nordic Food in Tourism project as well as other sources are interwoven with this aim, with the aim of deepening the understanding of the discussion points that were made and the measures that are proposed. The actions and emphases that emerge are limited to Iceland and the emphases that the participants of the workshop in this country wanted to convey. The aim is for this summary to be used as a basis for proposals for policy-making on tourism assessment in Iceland and to provide inspiration for further collaboration, development, investment and innovation in tourism assessment with sustainability as a guiding principle.

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Reports

Sustainability in local food production and tourism. Symposium at Smyrlabjörg 26-27. October 2011. Greinagerð / A seminar on local food production, tourism and sustainability

Published:

01/04/2014

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Fanney Björg Sveinsdóttir, Þorvarður Árnason

Supported by:

Technology Development Fund

Contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Sustainability in local food production and tourism. Symposium at Smyrlabjörg 26-27. October 2011. Greinagerð / A seminar on local food production, tourism and sustainability

The symposium Sustainability of local food production and tourism was held in Smyrlabjörg in October 2011. The aim of the symposium was to present the results of measurements of sustainability in Hornafjörður in the summer of 2011, present related projects and discuss how local food production can promote sustainability in tourism. to the marketing of local food and to get ideas for actions and projects that promote increased sustainability in small-scale production and tourism in Iceland. There were 11 presentations at the seminar. They will be briefly described here. The appendix contains a report prepared in the wake of the seminar on origin labeling and the marketing of regional foods.

In October 2011 a seminar on local food production, tourism and sustainability. The aim of the seminar was to report results on sustainability analysis within the Hornafjordur region, introduce related projects and encourage discussions on how local food can support sustainability in tourism, how to market local food and bring forward ideas on actions and projectsthatsupport increased sustainability in small scale production and tourism in Iceland.

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Reports

Food and sustainable tourism. Summary.

Published:

01/04/2014

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

Technology Development Fund

Contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Food and sustainable tourism. Summary.

Food and sustainable tourism was a priority and cluster project to promote environmentally friendly food production and food processing in connection with tourism. The project was carried out by public bodies in the business support system, regional development associations and the University of Iceland. The project was carried out in response to a great deal of interest in local food and the environment in connection with the growing activities in tourism. The emphasis was on supporting entrepreneurs in the development of new products and sales channels that benefit tourism in each area. The innovation segment was successful and had a multiplier effect both domestically, nationally and internationally. At the same time, important research was conducted on sustainability criteria, consumer attitudes and quality and shelf life. The communication and communication part of the project was no less important. This report briefly describes the progress of the project and the main conclusions.

Food and Sustainable Tourism was a 3 year collaboration project between academia, R&D institutions and regional development agencies. In the project focus was put on strengthening small scale local food production to encourage sustainability in tourism. The project was executed as a response to rise in interest in local food and environmental issues within tourism. Focus was put on supporting entrepreneurs developing new products and sales channels. Research on sustainability indicators, consumer attitudes and product quality was carried out. 

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