Reports

Íslenskt matkorn - Gæði, inhald og viðhör / Icelandic cereal grain crops for food - Quality, chemical composition and consumer view

Published:

01/01/2012

Authors:

Ólafur Reykdal, Þóra Valsdóttir, Þórdís Anna Kristjánsdóttir, Jón Þór Pétursson, Jónatan Hermannsson

Supported by:

Agricultural Productivity Fund, Agricultural University of Iceland

contact

Ólafur Reykdal

Project Manager

olafur.reykdal@matis.is

Íslenskt matkorn – Gæði, innihald og viðhorf / Icelandic cereal grain crops for food – Quality, chemical composition and consumer view

From 2009 to 2011, Matís and the Agricultural University of Iceland carried out a project on domestic grain for food production. The project was intended to promote the increased use of domestic cereals in food. For this purpose, quality requirements for barley were compiled and material on internal control was compiled for grain farmers' manuals. Chemical measurements of domestic cereals were also carried out, product development from cereals was supported and consumers' attitudes towards domestic barley were examined. Quality requirements for food barley and barley for brewing are set out and are intended to be a reference in business. A general text on the internal control of cereal growers can be localized for individual farms. According to chemical measurements, the starch in the domestic grain was not significantly different from that measured in imported grain. There was a lot of fiber in the domestic grain. The concentration of heavy metals in grain after the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull was very low.

A project on the use of Icelandic grain crops for food production was carried out at Matis and the Agricultural University of Iceland in 2009 to 2011. The purpose of the project was to support the increasing use of domestic cereal grain crops for food production. To enable this, quality requirements were developed for barley and a handbook on internal control was written for barley processing at a farm. Proximates and inorganic elements were measured, product development was supported and finally the view of consumers towards Icelandic barley was studied. Quality requirements for barley to be used for food and alcoholic drinks were developed as a frame of reference for businesses. The text for internal control can be adapted for individual farms. The starch in Icelandic grain crops was similar to that of imported crops. The Icelandic grain crops were rich in dietary fiber. The concentrations of heavy metals in the Icelandic crops after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption were very low.

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Reports

Seasonal variations in quality and processing properties of whiting (Merlangius merlangus) by season

Published:

30/10/2011

Authors:

Ásbjörn Jónsson

Supported by:

Fisheries Project Fund

Seasonal variations in quality and processing properties of whiting (Merlangius merlangus) by season

The aim of the project was to build up a specific knowledge base for cod (Merlangius merlangus) and obtain information on the variability of its quality and processing properties (chemical and physical properties) according to the season. For comparison, information on haddock was used. The results showed that fillet utilization (processing utilization) was related to carcass production, as there was a positive correlation between fillet utilization and body mass index, which was noticeably highest in March. At the same time, there was less release in the fish compared to other seasons. The results of the project seem to indicate that it is not appropriate to fish for halibut around the spawning season, or in the middle of summer, in terms of processing, physical and other quality characteristics.

The aim of the project was to study seasonal variation in quality and processing properties of whiting (Merlangius merlangus). Haddock was used as a reference group. The results showed positive correlation between fillet yield and condition factor, with highest value in March. At the same time gaping was minor. The results indicated that during spawning time it is not suitable to catch whiting with regards to processing‐ and quality properties.

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Reports

Quality survey of minced beef in January 2010 / Evaluation of the quality of minced beef in January 2010

Published:

01/03/2010

Authors:

Ólafur Reykdal, Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

National Association of Cow Farmers, Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture, Consumer Association

contact

Ólafur Reykdal

Project Manager

olafur.reykdal@matis.is

Quality survey of minced beef in January 2010 / Evaluation of the quality of minced beef in January 2010

In mid-January 2010, a survey was conducted on the content and labeling of ground beef. Eight samples were taken from pre-packaged ground beef in shops in the capital area. The labeling of the packaging was examined with regard to the provisions in regulations. Measurements were made of meat species, soy protein, fat, protein and water. Added water and added fiber / hydrocarbons were evaluated by calculations. The main results of the survey are that other types of meat were not mixed with ground beef and soy protein was not detected. According to calculations, water was added in 6 samples out of 8, but for one of the six samples, water was not in the description of ingredients. The packaging of two samples was marked with 12% added water, but the calculations did not indicate much added water. According to the ingredient descriptions, potato fiber is increased to 4 products out of 8. The fibers bind water, but the use of such substances is permitted according to regulations. A comparison with nutrition labeling revealed that fat was above the stated value in three cases and protein was below the marked value in two cases. In some cases, the labeling on the packaging did not meet the requirements of the regulations. Nutrition labeling was missing for two samples. There was a lack of adequate address and subtitle markings. It can be concluded that there is a need to improve the labeling of beef mince packaging. Regulation on meat and meat products no. 331/2005 is unclear on issues such as added water and therefore there is every reason to review the regulation.

A survey on the composition and labeling of minced beef was carried out in January 2010. Eight products of prepacked minced beef were sampled from supermarkets in Reykjavik. The labels were compared to provisions in regulations. The products were analyzed for meat species soy protein, fat, protein, ash and water. Added water and added carbohydrates / fiber were calculated from analytical values. The main results of the survey were that other meat species were not added to the minced beef and soy protein was not detected. According to calculations, water was added to 6 out of 8 samples but for one of the samples water was not listed as an ingredient. In two products added water was less than the 12 percent stated on the label. Potato fibers were according to the labels added to 4 products. This is in accordance with regulations. Fat percentage was higher than declared in three products and protein was less than declared in two products. Labeling did not fulfill regulatory requirements in some cases. Nutrient labeling was lacking in 2 samples. Addresses of producers and subtext in the name of the products were sometimes missing. The Icelandic regulation on meat and meat products No. 331/2005 is unclear on how to estimate and calculate added water and needs to be revised.

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Reports

Catfish. Catch, markets, utilization and chemical content / Atlantic wolffish. Icelandic catch volumes, markets, yield and chemical content

Published:

01/01/2010

Authors:

Kristín Anna Þórarinsdóttir

Catfish. Catch, markets, utilization and chemical content / Atlantic wolffish. Icelandic catch volumes, markets, yield and chemical content

The report is a brief overview of the state of the knowledge available today on the catch volume, life pattern, utilization and chemical content of catfish caught in Iceland. The Marine Research Institute has been working on research into the distribution and life pattern of catfish in the sea around Iceland. Statistics Iceland's statistics show developments in, among other things, fishing and the disposal of catfish catches. Knowledge of the variability in the processing properties and chemical content of the fish is limited and nothing was found about the stability of catfish products during storage. The research based on utilization and chemical content is based on older data from IFL (now Matís ohf) from around 1980. They show that, as with other species, the condition of the fish is highly dependent on the time of spawning and the time of year. What makes catfish different from more common species such as cod is that it loses teeth during spawning and guards its eggs which inhibits food acquisition.

This report is a broad literature review about catch volumes, reproduction, yield and chemical content of Atlantic wolffish caught in Icelandic waters. The Icelandic Marine Institute has investigated the distribution, growth, maturity and fecundity of the fish and the Icelandic Statistics collects and produces statistics on fish catch, manufactured products and exports. Information about the variability in yield and chemical content of wolffish are limited and knowledge about the stability and degradation process of wolffish products is limited.

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Reports

Comparison of properties of farmed cod and wild cod in loose freezing / Effects of freezing on muscle properties of wild and farmed cod fillets

Published:

01/12/2008

Authors:

Valur Norðri Gunnlaugsson, María Guðjónsdóttir, Guðrún Anna Finnbogadóttir, Kristján Jóakimsson, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

AVS R26-06 / AVS R&D Fund of Ministry of Fisheries in Iceland

contact

Valur Norðri Gunnlaugsson

Group Leader

valur.n.gunnlaugsson@matis.is

Comparison of properties of farmed cod and wild cod in loose freezing / Effects of freezing on muscle properties of wild and farmed cod fillets

A comparison was made of the effects of freezing on different cod fillets. The raw material was farmed pre rigor cod and wild pre and post rigor cod. It was also investigated how fillets sprayed with brine came out of the freezer. The results showed that freezing did not in any way reduce the quality of these products. They performed well in quality assessment, emissions did not increase in samples and there was little or no change in the chemical content of these samples. The products all came out well from the freezing, whether it was farmed fish or wild fish and what treatment he received during the slaughter process.

The research was part of the project "Processing and quality control of farmed cod, more specifically a summary for work component 6.

In this project phase the aim was to look at effect of freezing on cod fillets from wild and farmed cod in different rigor stages. The goal was also to evaluate effects of brine injecting on the quality of the product after freezing and thawing. The results indicated that the freezing process did not affect the quality of those products. The quality assessment and chemical measurements did not indicate negative changes during freezing and thawing. All the samples got good results, both farmed and wild cod samples and the brine injection did not affect the quality of frozen products.

Report closed until December 2011 / Report closed until December 2011

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