Reports

Northern Cereals - New Opportunities

Published:

27/05/2016

Authors:

Ólafur Reykdal, Sæmundur Sveinsson, Sigríður Dalmannsdóttir, Peter Martin, Jens Ivan í Gerðin, Vanessa Kavanagh, Aqqalooraq Frederiksen, Jónatan Hermannsson

Supported by:

NORA, the Nordic Atlantic Cooperation. NORA project number 515-005

contact

Ólafur Reykdal

Project Manager

olafur.reykdal@matis.is

Northern Cereals - New Opportunities

A project on grain farming in the Arctic was carried out between 2013 and 2015. The project was funded by the Nordic-Atlantic Co-operation (NORA). Participants came from Iceland, Northern Norway, the Faroe Islands, Greenland, Orkney and Newfoundland. The purpose of the project was to support grain farming in sparsely populated Nordic areas by testing different barley crops and providing guidelines for farmers and food companies. The most promising barley crops (Kría, Tiril, Saana, Bere, NL) were tested with all participants and measurements were made on yield and quality. The amount of barley harvest varied between regions and years. The average starch content of dried grain was 58%, which is sufficient for the baking industry. Fungal toxins (Mycotoxin) were not detected in the samples sent for analysis. It was concluded that early grain sowing was the most important factor in promoting a good grain harvest in the NORA area. Unit is important to cut the grain early to prevent losses due to storms and birds.

A project on the cultivation of cereals in the North Atlantic Region was carried out in the period 2013 to 2015. The project was supported by the Nordic Atlantic Cooperation (NORA). Partners came from Iceland, NNorway, Faroe Islands, Greenland, Orkney and Newfoundland. The purpose of the project was to support cereal cultivation in rural northern regions by testing barley varieties and providing guidelines for farmers and industry. The most promising barley varieties (Kria, Tiril, Saana, Bere and NL) were tested in all partner regions for growth and quality characteristics. Grain yields were very variable across the region and differed between years. Average starch content of grain was about 58% which is sufficient for the baking industry. Mycotoxins, toxins formed by certain species of mold, were not detected in selected samples. Early sowing was concluded to be the most important factor for a successful cereal production in the North Atlantic region. Early harvest is recommended in order to secure the harvest before it becomes vulnerable to wind and bird damages, even though the grain will be slightly less mature.

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Reports

Íslenskt matkorn - Gæði, inhald og viðhör / Icelandic cereal grain crops for food - Quality, chemical composition and consumer view

Published:

01/01/2012

Authors:

Ólafur Reykdal, Þóra Valsdóttir, Þórdís Anna Kristjánsdóttir, Jón Þór Pétursson, Jónatan Hermannsson

Supported by:

Agricultural Productivity Fund, Agricultural University of Iceland

contact

Ólafur Reykdal

Project Manager

olafur.reykdal@matis.is

Íslenskt matkorn – Gæði, innihald og viðhorf / Icelandic cereal grain crops for food – Quality, chemical composition and consumer view

From 2009 to 2011, Matís and the Agricultural University of Iceland carried out a project on domestic grain for food production. The project was intended to promote the increased use of domestic cereals in food. For this purpose, quality requirements for barley were compiled and material on internal control was compiled for grain farmers' manuals. Chemical measurements of domestic cereals were also carried out, product development from cereals was supported and consumers' attitudes towards domestic barley were examined. Quality requirements for food barley and barley for brewing are set out and are intended to be a reference in business. A general text on the internal control of cereal growers can be localized for individual farms. According to chemical measurements, the starch in the domestic grain was not significantly different from that measured in imported grain. There was a lot of fiber in the domestic grain. The concentration of heavy metals in grain after the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull was very low.

A project on the use of Icelandic grain crops for food production was carried out at Matis and the Agricultural University of Iceland in 2009 to 2011. The purpose of the project was to support the increasing use of domestic cereal grain crops for food production. To enable this, quality requirements were developed for barley and a handbook on internal control was written for barley processing at a farm. Proximates and inorganic elements were measured, product development was supported and finally the view of consumers towards Icelandic barley was studied. Quality requirements for barley to be used for food and alcoholic drinks were developed as a frame of reference for businesses. The text for internal control can be adapted for individual farms. The starch in Icelandic grain crops was similar to that of imported crops. The Icelandic grain crops were rich in dietary fiber. The concentrations of heavy metals in the Icelandic crops after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption were very low.

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Reports

Production of fish sauce from Icelandic seafood with useful fermentation / Fish Sauce produced by useful fermentation

Published:

01/01/2012

Authors:

Arnljótur B. Bergsson, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Alexandra M. Klonowski, Ásbjörn Jónsson, Loftur Þórarinsson, María Pétursdóttir, Sigrún Sigmundsdóttir, Patricia Y. Hamaguchi

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund, East Iceland Growth Agreement

contact

Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir

Sensory evaluation manager

adalheiduro@matis.is

Production of fish sauce from Icelandic seafood with useful fermentation / Fish Sauce produced by useful fermentation

Fish sauce is a clear brownish liquid that has a characteristic smell and taste. Fish sauce can be produced by fermenting fish puree and salt with or without added excipients. Fish sauce is often used as a flavoring in cooking. Fish sauce was produced using 3 methods from different raw materials such as by-products of fillet processing as well as pelagic fish. Specially treated Icelandic barley was also tested for fish sauce production. Samples from fish sauces were evaluated in sensory evaluation, ie. taste, smell, color and turbidity. The chemical content, amino acid composition and bioactivity of the samples were measured. The yield of fish sauce production was assessed. Business analysis for fish sauce was performed. The results of the project indicate that it has been possible to produce fish sauce that can be compared to sauces that are sold widely.

Fish sauce is a brownish liquid with distinctive odor and flavor. Fish sauce can be produced with fermentation w./wo added enzymes. Fish sauce is commonly used as a condiment. Fish sauce was produced by 3 methods from various raw materials eg by ‐ products of fillet production and pelagic species. Koji developed from Icelandic barley was used in trials of fish sauce preparation. Samples of fish sauces went through sensory analyzes. Chemical content, free amino acid proportion and bioactivity of the samples were measured. Yield in fish sauce preparation was estimated and business plan was drafted. Results indicate that preparation of fish sauce similar to commonly traded products was successful.

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Reports

Development of bakery products made from Icelandic corn

Published:

01/09/2009

Authors:

Gunnþórunn Einarsdóttir, Emilía Martinsdóttir, Þóra Valsdóttir, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

Growth agreement between the South and the Westman Islands

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Development of bakery products made from Icelandic corn

The aim of the project was to develop bread, biscuits and other products exclusively from Icelandic ingredients. They started to develop oatmeal from barley. We tried to have as high a proportion of Icelandic ingredients in the recipes as possible. Eight types of biscuits were produced. Three of them were selected and put to a consumer survey in which 120 people participated. Significant differences were found between the two, both in terms of overall rating and whether consumers could consider buying the product. Consumers were divided into two groups according to their consumption of oatmeal cookies. Those who ate oatmeal twice a month or more often noticed differences in the three products and gave them a higher overall score than those who ate oatmeal less than twice a month. The product that consumers liked best was 67.2 % of Icelandic raw materials, of which 6.2% was barley flour. On the other hand, it was the sample that consumers liked the most with 67.4% of Icelandic raw materials, of which 9.1% was barley flour. There seems to be a limit to how much barley flour can be used in the biscuits. The target group for barley oatmeal is those consumers who eat oatmeal cookies regularly, as the results showed that they generally liked all types of biscuits better.

The aim of the project was to develop bread, biscuit and other products exclusively made from Icelandic raw material. Digestive biscuits made from barley were developed. The ratio of the Icelandic raw material in the recipes was kept as high as possible. Eight types of biscuits were produced. A consumer study with 120 participants was carried out and three biscuits were chosen out of the eight in the beginning. Significant differences were found between two products regarding the overall liking of the products and if the consumer could envision that he was going to buy the product. The consumers were divided into two groups regarding their own consumption of digestive biscuits. Those who consumed digestive biscuits two times or more per month could distinguish a difference between the three products and gave them higher scores on the overall liking then the consumer who consumed digestive biscuits rarer than two times per month. The product that the consumers liked the most had 67.2 % Icelandic raw material, thereof 6.2% barley. However, the product that the consumers liked the least had 67.4% Icelandic raw material, thereof 9.1% barley. It seems that there is some limit to how much barley can be used in the recipes for the biscuits. The target consumer group for digestive biscuits with barley are the consumers that eat digestive biscuits regularly as the finding of this study showed that they overall liked all the biscuits more.

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