Reports

Full utilization of proteins from Lumpfish

Published:

01/12/2015

Authors:

Margrét Geirsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS (V12 062-12)

Contact

Margrét Geirsdóttir

Project Manager

mg@matis.is

Full utilization of proteins from Lumpfish

The aim of the project was to develop new protein products from raw materials generated during the processing of grayling eggs. In this way, the aim was to extract even more value from the raw material by producing valuable protein products from grayling. The project examined the development of three products, 1) isolated protein for surimi, 2) dried protein as an additive and 3) hydrolyzed protein as an additive and / or dietary supplement. Protein isolates from grayling meat were difficult to isolate, but the results of bioactivity measurements of products from hydrolyzed proteins are promising for further research.

The aim of the project was to develop new products from lump fish to increase the yield and value of the catch. In the project the aim was to develop three types of products: 1) isolated proteins for surimi, 2) dry proteins as additives and 3) hydrolysed proteins as additives and / or food supplements. The project revealed that protein isolation from lump fish is difficult but hydrolyzed proteins showed promising bioactive properties.

View report

Reports

Ecological impact on bioactive chemicals in brown seaweeds and their utilization

Published:

01/09/2015

Authors:

Rósa Jónsdóttir, Ásta Heiðrún Pétursdóttir, Halldór Benediktsson, Hilma B. Eiðsdóttir, Karl Gunnarsson, Jóna Freysdóttir

Supported by:

Fisheries Project Fund

Contact

Rósa Jónsdóttir

Research Group Leader

rosa.jonsdottir@matis.is

Ecological impact on bioactive chemicals in brown seaweeds and their utilization

The aim of the project was to investigate the effects of environmental factors on the amount and bioactivity of polyphenols and polysaccharides in seaweed and kelp. The aim was to increase knowledge of the ecology and chemistry of these species for more efficient isolation of biological substances, their further analysis and utilization for bioactivity measurements. Samples of seaweed, marine core, pimples and claw seaweed were taken at three locations in the country; in the northern part of Reykjanes, in Breiðafjörður and Eskifjörður, a total of six times a year, from March to June, in August and October. A method was developed to isolate fucoidan and laminaran polysaccharides from bubble seaweed and claw seaweed. Total polyphenols were measured in all samples but bioactivity in selected samples. In addition, heavy metals and iodine were measured in selected samples. The amount of polyphenols was high in smallpox and seaweed, but low in marine nuclei and gillnets. Antioxidant activity, measured as ORAC and in the cellular system, was high in the samples containing high levels of polyphenols. Seaweed and seaweed showed anti-inflammatory activity. The results of the project significantly increase knowledge in the field of utilization of seaweed and kelp. They are useful in the development of seaweed processing for human consumption that is currently underway.

The aim of the project was to study the effect of environmental factors on polyphenols and polysaccharides in seaweed. Thereby be able to better recognize the ecology and chemistry of these species for more efficient isolation of the biochemical, their further analysis and utilization in bioactive measurements. Samples of Saccharina latissima, Alaria esculenta, Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus were collected at three different locations, Reykjanes, Breiðafjörður and Eskifjörður, from March to October, in total six times. Method to isolate fucoidan and laminaran polysaccharides was developed. Total polyphenol content (TPC) was measured in all samples and bioactivity in selected samples. In addition, contaminants and iodine were analyzed in selected samples. The TPC was high in F. vesiculosus and A. nodosum but rather low in A. esculenta and S. latissima. The antioxidant acitivty, measured as ORAC value and in cells, was high in samples containing high amount of TPC. F. vesiculosus and A. esculenta had anti-inflammatory properties. The results of the project have increased the knowledge about the utilization of seaweed in Iceland substantially.

Report closed until 31.12.2017

View report

Reports

Bioactive surimi developed from by-products

Published:

01/10/2014

Authors:

Hörður G. Kristinsson

Supported by:

Rannís Technology Development Fund - RAN090915‐1790

Bioactive surimi developed from by-products

The aim of the project was to develop and set up a new processing process to produce high-quality bioactive surimi products from underutilized and cheap raw materials. There is a great shortage of high quality surimi in the world and also a very growing demand for products with bioactivity and health benefits. Therefore, there is a great opportunity now for Iceland to gain a foothold in this market. In the project, the process was maximized and the properties of the product were measured and confirmed by customers. New methods and mixtures were developed to produce a new product, a bioactivator, with a focus on products that can contribute to improved consumer health. It is now possible to start surimi production, which can lead to more jobs, increased diversity in the production of seafood in Iceland and an increase in foreign exchange earnings.

The overall objective of this project was to develop and commercialize a highly novel protein recovery process to produce high value and high quality bioactive surimi and surimi seafood products from low value and underutilized Icelandic raw materials. On world bases, there is a need for high quality surimi and furthermore an increasing demand for bioactive and “health‐ promoting” products. In the project the process was optimized, product properties measured and confirmed by future byers. It is now possible to start production in Iceland on bioactive surimi that will lead to increased value, more jobs and various new products from the Icelandic fishing industry.

Report closed until 01.11.2016

View report

Reports

Production of valuable products from viscera / Production of valuable products from viscera

Published:

01/03/2014

Authors:

Sigrún Mjöll Halldórsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS

Production of valuable products from viscera / Production of valuable products from viscera

Fish stew is rich in many different substances such as protein, fish oil and minerals, which can be good in all kinds of valuable products. The purpose of the project was to investigate the possibility of using material from slag for pet food and / or fertilizer for plants. Cod processing with and without liver was performed with enzymes: on the one hand Alkalase and on the other hand a mixture of Alkalasa and cod enzymes. Attempts were made to collect fat phase from the slag. The fatty phase was analyzed for fatty acids and peroxide values were measured to assess the degree of development. The protein component was then spray dried and the following measurements were performed: protein content, amino acid analysis, trace element measurement, antioxidant activity (metal chelating ability, DPPH, ORAC, reducing ability and antioxidant activity in the cellular system) and antihypertensive activity. The main results are that the enzymatic slag has an excellent ability to bind to metal and can thus maintain metals (minerals) in a form that both plants and animals can use. The amino acid composition was also very suitable as nutrition for dogs and cats.

Fish viscera is rich in many different materials, such as protein, oil and minerals that can be good in all kinds of valuable products. The purpose of this project was to investigate the possibility of utilizing materials of viscera in pet food and / or fertilizer for plants. Viscera from cod processing with and without liver was processed with the following enzymes: Alcalase and a mixture of Alcalase and cod enzymes. Attempts were made to collect the lipid phase of the viscera. Fatty acids were analyzed in the lipid phase and measured peroxide values to assess the degree of rancidity. The remaining protein solution was spray dried and the following measurements performed: protein content, amino acid analysis, measurement of trace elements, antioxidant (metal chelating, DPPH, ORAC, reducing ability and antioxidant activity in cell systems) and blood pressure lowering activity. The main conclusion is that hydrolysed viscera protein has excellent ability to metal chelation and can thereby maintain metals (minerals) in the form that both plants and animals can utilize. Amino acid composition was also very suitable as nutrition for dogs and cats.

View report

Reports

Experimental fishing and exploitation of Mueller's pearlsides

Published:

01/10/2012

Authors:

Ragnheiður Sveinþórsdóttir, Margrét Geirsdóttir, Hólmfríður Hartmannsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

Contact

Margrét Geirsdóttir

Project Manager

mg@matis.is

Experimental fishing and exploitation of Mueller's pearlsides

Gulldepla has been seen to a small extent off Iceland in recent years, but an unusual amount has been seen off the south coast of Iceland in the winters of 2008/2009 and 2009/2010. Several vessels started trying to catch it in December 2008 and January 2009 with good results and the hearth went into smelting. In the project, various possibilities were considered regarding the utilization of the gold mine and it would be interesting to examine some of them better with regard to the increase in value that they could entail. The possibility of using gold nuggets in surimi, canning, feed in aquaculture, bait, pet treats or the production of bioactive substances was discussed. It was especially interesting to see how light products from gold dust turned out to be when bioactive substances were made from it, compared to the starting raw material and also what taste and smell turned out to be acceptable.

Mueller's pearlside has not historically occurred on Icelandic fishing grounds, but from 2008 pelagic fishers found an increase on the south coast of the country. Exploratory fishing trips were undertaken by a few ships in December 2008 and January 2009. The catch rate was acceptable and the catch was processed into fishmeal. In the project, multiple potential uses for pearlside were investigated and some produced results that indicated it would be worthwhile to research further due to the increased value they may lead to. For example, applications included surimi, canning, aquaculture feed, bait, pet treats or products with bioactivity. The most interesting result was how light the fish protein extracts were compared to the raw mince material when the bioactivity was explored, and also that the taste and smell were very acceptable.

View report

Reports

Cartilage saccharides and bioactive compounds from sea cucumbers

Published:

01/06/2012

Authors:

Ólafur Friðjónsson, Varsha Kale, Jón Óskar Jónsson, Sesselja Ómarsdóttir, Hörður Kristinsson, Margrét Geirsdóttir, Patricia Y. Hamaguchi, Guðlaugur Sighvatsson, Sigfús Snorrason, Kári P. Ólafsson, Guðmundur Ó. Hreggviðsson

Supported by:

Tækniþróunarsjóður, AVS

Contact

Ólafur H. Friðjónsson

Research Group Leader

olafur@matis.is

Cartilage saccharides and bioactive compounds from sea cucumbers

In recent years, Matís, in collaboration with the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Iceland, IceProtein ehf and Reykofninn ehf, has conducted research on cartilage sugars (chondroitin sulphate) from shark cartilage and sea urchins from Icelandic smelters (Cucumaria frondosa). Studies around the world have shown a wide range of bioactivity of cartilage sugars, in vitro and in vivo, and such sugars are used as a dietary supplement, usually with glucosamine to treat osteoarthritis. Studies have also shown that cutting cartilage sugars into smaller units (oligosaccharides) can potentially increase their bioactivity in vitro. The research of Matís and partners, which was supported by the AVS Fisheries Research Fund and the Technology Development Fund, showed that cartilage sugars can be produced from shark cartilage and coarsely refined cartilage sugars from simple edema. It is also possible to produce oligosaccharides from shark cartilage with specific biocatalysts, which were prepared in the research project. The cartilage sugars show considerable bioactivity in vitro and cartilage sugars from Icelandic sea otters are particularly interesting as they show antioxidant activity, immune-regulating activity and hypoglycemic activity. The molecular structure of cartilage sugar from sea urchins is complex compared to shark cartilage sugars as they contain side chains composed of different types of sugars. The production of refined cartilage sugars from sea edema is therefore a complex process and it is anticipated that such sugars will be expensive on the market. Matís and IceProtein in collaboration with Reykofninn are now preparing further production of coarsely refined cartilage sugars from seaweed in sales and promotional activities.

In recent years, Matís ohf, The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Iceland, IceProtein and Reykofninn ehf have collaborated in a research project on cartilage saccharides (chondroitin sulfate) isolated from shark and sea cucumbers from waters around Iceland (Cucumaria frondosa). The project results indicate that processing of the chondroitin sulfate from shark cartilage is a simple procedure and production of disaccharides with recombinant biocatalyst, evolved in the project, may be profitable. The chondroitin sulfate shows considerable bioactivity. Fractions of chondroitin sulfate purified from sea cucumbers, are especially interesting as they display immunomodulating activity and anti ‐ diabetic properties. However, the structure of the sea cucumber chondroitin sulfate is complex as they contain side chains composed of fucoside residues. Hence, the production and purification of chondroitin sulfate from Icelandic sea cucumbers will be a complicated procedure. Nevertheless, the results indicate that production of crude chondroitin sulfate from sea cucumber can be viable procedure.

Report closed until 01.07.2015

View report

Reports

Production of fish sauce from Icelandic seafood with useful fermentation / Fish Sauce produced by useful fermentation

Published:

01/01/2012

Authors:

Arnljótur B. Bergsson, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Alexandra M. Klonowski, Ásbjörn Jónsson, Loftur Þórarinsson, María Pétursdóttir, Sigrún Sigmundsdóttir, Patricia Y. Hamaguchi

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund, East Iceland Growth Agreement

Contact

Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir

Sensory evaluation manager

adalheiduro@matis.is

Production of fish sauce from Icelandic seafood with useful fermentation / Fish Sauce produced by useful fermentation

Fish sauce is a clear brownish liquid that has a characteristic smell and taste. Fish sauce can be produced by fermenting fish puree and salt with or without added excipients. Fish sauce is often used as a flavoring in cooking. Fish sauce was produced using 3 methods from different raw materials such as by-products of fillet processing as well as pelagic fish. Specially treated Icelandic barley was also tested for fish sauce production. Samples from fish sauces were evaluated in sensory evaluation, ie. taste, smell, color and turbidity. The chemical content, amino acid composition and bioactivity of the samples were measured. The yield of fish sauce production was assessed. Business analysis for fish sauce was performed. The results of the project indicate that it has been possible to produce fish sauce that can be compared to sauces that are sold widely.

Fish sauce is a brownish liquid with distinctive odor and flavor. Fish sauce can be produced with fermentation w./wo added enzymes. Fish sauce is commonly used as a condiment. Fish sauce was produced by 3 methods from various raw materials eg by ‐ products of fillet production and pelagic species. Koji developed from Icelandic barley was used in trials of fish sauce preparation. Samples of fish sauces went through sensory analyzes. Chemical content, free amino acid proportion and bioactivity of the samples were measured. Yield in fish sauce preparation was estimated and business plan was drafted. Results indicate that preparation of fish sauce similar to commonly traded products was successful.

View report

Reports

Gold in the fists of Ægis / Antioxidants from Icelandic marine sources

Published:

01/05/2010

Authors:

Rósa Jónsdóttir, Patricia Hamaguchi, Guðrún Ólafsdóttir, Tao Wang

Supported by:

AVS R&D Fund of Ministry of Fisheries in Iceland

Contact

Rósa Jónsdóttir

Research Group Leader

rosa.jonsdottir@matis.is

Gold in the fists of Ægis / Antioxidants from Icelandic marine sources

The purpose of this project was to screen for anti-corrosive substances from Icelandic seafood such as algae, capelin and sagebrush, to be used as a food additive, target food or as a dietary supplement. Particular attention was paid to the possible use of polyphenols from algae as natural antioxidants to prevent the development of fish products and fish muscle proteins (isolates). This was done by screening for antioxidant activity with several types of antioxidant tests. The most promising antioxidant was chosen to better study its antioxidant properties in food models, i.e. washed cod muscle system, cod protein system and in fish burgers. The results showed, among other things, that polyphenols from the seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus) have high antioxidant properties and are promising for use as a dietary supplement or in food to promote greater stability, taste and nutritional value.

The aim of this project was to explore the natural antioxidant activity of marine sources like seaweed, capelin and cod spleen to use as food additives, functional ingredients or nutritional supplements. The potential application of algal polyphenols as novel natural antioxidants to prevent lipid oxidation of fish muscle and fish protein based products was of special interest. This was done by screening for antioxidant activity using different types of antioxidant assays. The most promising antioxidants were selected and their antioxidant properties studied further in fish model systems and fish patties. The results showed that phlorotannins isolated from bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus) had very high antioxidant properties and has a potential as nutritional supplements or food additive to enhance oxidative stability, flavor quality and nutritional value.

View report

Reports

Bioactive properties of whey proteins

Published:

01/02/2009

Authors:

Patricia Y. Hamaguchi, Sigrún Mjöll Halldórsdóttir, Hörður G. Kristinsson, Arnljótur B. Bergsson, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

Framleinisjóður landbúnaðarins & Vaxtarsamningur Norðurlands vestra

Bioactive properties of whey proteins

The research described in this report is part of the project Utilization of cheese whey in health-related foods. The project is about improving the utilization and increasing the value of whey that is generated during cheese production at Mjólkursamlag KS in Sauðárkrókur by using both protein and lactose for the production of health drinks and dietary supplements. With improved utilization of milk, for example through the use of whey proteins, unnecessary release of biological substances into the environment can be avoided. Ostamysa from Mjólkursamlag KS was separated into four parts by membrane filtration equipment (Membrane Pilot Plant Type MEM11) in the processing hall of the Matís Biotechnology Center in Sauðárkrókur by Iceprotein employees, on the one hand through a 10 kDa membrane and on the other hand a 200 Da membrane. Chemical composition (moisture, protein, salt, minerals) and bioactivity (ACE inhibitory activity and antioxidant properties) were analyzed in Matís' laboratory in these four samples and the whey itself was measured unchanged. The results are promising and show that there is bioactivity in the whey, which can be used in target foods.

The experiment described in this report is part of the project Utilization of Cheese whey in health-based food products which aims are to improve utilization and increase value of whey that is discarded during the cheese production at KS Sauðárkrókur, by using proteins and lactose to produce health drink and nutritional supplements. With better utilization, unnecessary disposal of bioactive components can be avoided. Cheese ‐ Whey samples from KS were fractionated with membrane filtration equipment (Membrane Pilot Plant Type MEM11) at Matís Biotechnology center in Sauðárkrókur with molecular weight cut ‐ offs 10 kDa and 200 Da. Chemical composition and bioactivity properties were analyzed at Matís Laboratory. Results show that whey contains promising bioactive compounds that could be used as functional food.

View report

Reports

Isolation and processing of bioactive peptides from underutilized species of marine organisms - preparation and formation of networks

Published:

01/05/2007

Authors:

Sigurður Vilhelmsson, Guðmundur Gunnarsson, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

Contact

Guðjón Þorkelsson

Strategy & Stakeholders

gudjon.thorkelsson@matis.is

Isolation and processing of bioactive peptides from underutilized species of marine organisms - preparation and formation of networks

In this preliminary project, preparations were made for the establishment of a center in the Westman Islands that will specialize in research, processing and marketing of products made from by-products of fish processing and underutilized species. The long-term goal is to start processing bioactive substances from seafood. To bridge the gap between raw material sourcing and specialized processing of bioactive substances, the center was expected to embark on projects that increase the value of by-products. A network was formed to ensure the development of skills and knowledge regarding the processing of bioactive and pharmaceutical forms. The network brought together both foreign and domestic researchers and stakeholders. Applications for collaborative projects were sent to Nordforsk and the NORA Fund, as well as applications to the ACP Fund with companies in Iceland for slag digestion processing, value added and product development. These emphases were also successfully incorporated into proposals for the Growth Agreement of the South, which was signed in October 2006. The collaboration will continue and the aim is to establish large international research projects on bioactivity in seafood. Special attention is paid to the 7th EC Framework Program. The group is also working on reviewing the status of each individual's knowledge and skills, and subsequently aims to publish a peer-reviewed review article on bioactive peptides in seafood.

The foundation of an R&D center in Vestmannaeyjar for utilizing marine byproducts by turning them into commercially viable products was prepared. The aim of the center is to establish state of the art of the processing of bioactive compounds from marine by-products and underutilized species. A small Nordic knowledge network to build competence and skills regarding bio processing of bio- and pharmaceutically active compounds was also established. The network now consists of scientists and industry related stakeholders from Norway, Scotland, Finland and Iceland. The network partners have decided to work together on joint international grant applications for R&D projects in marine bioprocessing. The network is currently comparing resources of knowledge and subsequently the aim is to publish a peer reviewed state of the art review of marine bioactive peptides.

View report
EN