Reports

Roadmap for the value chain of cod, salmon and char

Published:

05/06/2020

Authors:

Marvin Ingi Einarsson, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

The Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment of Finland

Roadmap for the value chain of cod, salmon and char

The objective of this work is to discuss Iceland's fishing and fish farming industries and approach the challenges there are and report on what has been done to meet those challenges. The main focus of this work will be on creating roadmaps for the supply chain of cod and the supply chain of salmon and arctic char and identify the obstacles these industries have faced. From fishing / farming to the consumer. This roadmap will show how and where increased value can be made using real examples from Iceland, shed light on critical factors affecting the quality and highlight the obstacles hindering further growth and development.

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Reports

New technology for the Nordic fishing fleet - Proceedings from a workshop on fishing gear and effective catch handling held in Reykjavik October 1st and 2nd 2013

Published:

01/01/2014

Authors:

Jónas R. Viðarsson, Ida Grong Aursand, Hanne Digre, Ulrik Jes Hansen, Leon Smith

Supported by:

AG ‐ fisk (The Nordic Working group for fisheries co ‐ operation)

contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Head of Value Creation

jonas@matis.is

New technology for the Nordic fishing fleet - Proceedings from a workshop on fishing gear and effective catch handling held in Reykjavik October 1st and 2nd 2013

This report presents the presentations held at the Nordic workshop on fishing gear and catch management, held in Reykjavík in October 2013. The report also contains some of the main findings of the meeting and the participants' suggestions for possible follow-up. The presentations published in the report, together with recordings of all presentations and various other topics related to the topic, can be accessed on the website www.fishinggearnetwork.net, which will be maintained at least until the end of 2015.

In this report are published presentations given at a Nordic workshop held in Reykjavik on various aspects of research and development on fishing gear and effective catch handling. The report also accounts for the main outputs from the workshop in regards to possible follow ‐ ups. All of the proceedings, including the content of this report and video recordings of all presentations are available at the project's web ‐ page www.fishinggearnetwork.net which will be maintained at least until the end of year 2015.

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Reports

Lobster trap fishing

Published:

01/09/2013

Authors:

Heather Philp, Vigfús Þórarinn Ásbjörnsson, Ragnheiður Sveinþórsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Reference Number R 043‐10

Lobster trap fishing

In the project, new fishing areas were defined for lobster trapping, they were tested and evaluated for feasibility. An optimal time was also found before the traps were visited after they had been laid. Data showing seasonal fluctuations, both in terms of catches and catch values, were reviewed, and new data were collected and defined. Markets for live lobsters were examined along with prices according to the seasons. The results of the project show that a large lobster is the most common catch in traps in Iceland, in fact the lobster is so large that traditional British packages are too small for it. It is also gratifying that the time of year that seems to be the biggest catch is the time when the highest price is obtained in the markets for live lobsters. New fishing areas that were defined proved to be good and promising for the future.

In the project, new fishing grounds were identified for the purpose of lobster trap fishing. They were explored and assessed. Also, the optimal “soak” time for the fishing was determined. A lot of historical data were explored to show how the catches varied during the year - both catches and the value of the catch - and new data were collected. Markets for live lobster were explored by value and time of year. The results of the project show that big lobsters are the most common catch in traps in Iceland. And in fact, the lobsters are so big that the packaging used for the lobster in the UK is too small. It's positive for Iceland that the time of year when catches are highest coincides with the time of year when prices are the highest too. New fishing grounds were identified which were both productive and promising for the future.

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Reports

Experimental fishing and exploitation of Mueller's pearlsides

Published:

01/10/2012

Authors:

Ragnheiður Sveinþórsdóttir, Margrét Geirsdóttir, Hólmfríður Hartmannsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

contact

Margrét Geirsdóttir

Project Manager

mg@matis.is

Experimental fishing and exploitation of Mueller's pearlsides

Gulldepla has been seen to a small extent off Iceland in recent years, but an unusual amount has been seen off the south coast of Iceland in the winters of 2008/2009 and 2009/2010. Several vessels started trying to catch it in December 2008 and January 2009 with good results and the hearth went into smelting. In the project, various possibilities were considered regarding the utilization of the gold mine and it would be interesting to examine some of them better with regard to the increase in value that they could entail. The possibility of using gold nuggets in surimi, canning, feed in aquaculture, bait, pet treats or the production of bioactive substances was discussed. It was especially interesting to see how light products from gold dust turned out to be when bioactive substances were made from it, compared to the starting raw material and also what taste and smell turned out to be acceptable.

Mueller's pearlside has not historically occurred on Icelandic fishing grounds, but from 2008 pelagic fishers found an increase on the south coast of the country. Exploratory fishing trips were undertaken by a few ships in December 2008 and January 2009. The catch rate was acceptable and the catch was processed into fishmeal. In the project, multiple potential uses for pearlside were investigated and some produced results that indicated it would be worthwhile to research further due to the increased value they may lead to. For example, applications included surimi, canning, aquaculture feed, bait, pet treats or products with bioactivity. The most interesting result was how light the fish protein extracts were compared to the raw mince material when the bioactivity was explored, and also that the taste and smell were very acceptable.

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Reports

Fishing, grading, processing and marketing of mackerel caught by pelagic vessels / Fishing, grading, processing and marketing of mackerel caught by pelagic vessels

Published:

01/03/2011

Authors:

Ragnheiður Sveinþórsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

Fishing, grading, processing and marketing of mackerel caught by pelagic vessels / Fishing, grading, processing and marketing of mackerel caught by pelagic vessels

In 2005, mackerel catches were first registered in Icelandic jurisdiction, although Icelandic vessels did not start fishing for mackerel systematically until 2007, mackerel fishing increased rapidly, but in 2009 fishing rights for mackerel were first limited. During these years, the catch has gone from 232 tonnes to 121 thousand tonnes. Initially, all the catch went to smelting, but in 2010 Icelanders froze 60% of the catch for human consumption. This report discusses fishing and processing of mackerel, equipment needed for mackerel processing for human consumption, handling of catch, measurements of mackerel caught in Icelandic jurisdiction and the market. In the project, samples were collected and measured in shape, gender and fat content. In the summer, mackerel enter Icelandic jurisdiction and are caught with herring, but both species are caught in trawls. When mackerel is processed for human consumption, it is decapitated and gutted, but in order to do so, in addition to the traditional processing line, so-called suction is needed, which sucks the slag from inside the mackerel. Mackerel also needs a longer freezing time than herring due to its cylindrical shape. The mackerel that enters Icelandic waters is often 35-40 cm long and weighs between 300 and 600 g. The main markets for summer-caught mackerel caught in Iceland are in Eastern Europe, where it continues to be processed into more valuable products.

In the year 2005 Icelanders first caught mackerel in Icelandic fishing grounds, but it was not until 2007 that Icelandic vessels began to catch mackerel by purpose. The fishing of mackerel increased fast but in 2009 the government put a limit on the catching. In these years the catch has increased from 232 tons to 121,000 tons. At first, a meal was made from all the catch, but in 2010 60% of the catch was frozen for human consumption. The subject of this report is the fishing and processing of mackerel, mechanisms that are needed to process the mackerel for human consumption, handling of the catch, measurement of mackerels and markets. For this project samples were collected and geometrician measurements performed by qualified staff. In the summer mackerel can be caught in Icelandic fishing grounds together with herring, it´s caught in pelagic trawl. When mackerel are processed for human consumption it´s headed and gutted, to do that a suck has to be used to suck the guts out. Mackerel also need longer time in the freezing device because of their cylindrical shape. The mackerel caught here are often 35‐40 cm long and 300‐600 g of weight. The main markets for mackerel caught during the summer are in Eastern Europe where it's processed into more valuable products.

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