Reports

Hunting, processing and exporting of live bait king

Published:

06/12/2018

Authors:

Jónas R. Viðarsson, Ásbjörn Jónsson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund (V 11005-11)

contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Head of Value Creation

jonas@matis.is

Hunting, processing and exporting of live bait king

This report outlines the implementation and main results of a research project that took place in the years 2012-2013. The reason for delaying the publication of the final report of the project is that in 2013 the owner of the project, Sægarpur ehf. bankrupt. The project was therefore not completed and has been largely dormant since 2013. However, since most of the project had been completed before Sægarpur went bankrupt, the authors consider it right and obligatory to publicly report here what took place in the project and what the main results are. its were. The aim of the project was to develop fishing, processing, storage and transport of live bait kingfishers, as well as to explore the market for such products. Experiments were carried out with different catch treatments on board a fishing vessel and storage or transport, which gave indications that with the right handling and finishing it would be possible to keep the bait king alive for approx. week. the aim had been to ensure at least 10 days of survival in order for it to be considered realistic to intend to export a live bait king. However, the results of the experiments showed that when more than a week had passed since the hunt, survival decreased rapidly and the meat had become unfit for consumption on the tenth day. It is possible that these processes could be better developed to ensure better survival, but based on these results, the shelf life is not long enough to be considered a viable option at this time. Attempts were also made to keep the bait king alive in a cycle system in a fish tank. The aim of these experiments was to investigate whether it was possible to store live bait king in a "warehouse" for processing on land. A circuit system was equipped with filter equipment that was sufficient to keep the bait king alive for a week. The authors believe that it would be possible to extend the time with more powerful filtering equipment. These results must be considered positive and conducive to the fact that they could be taken up by companies that process bait king. Markets for live bait king were also examined, but it can be said that this survey has finally brought home the truth that the export of live bait king is not a viable option. It is simply a better option to win the bait king here at home. If market conditions change, however, it is not ruled out that processes can be improved to make such exports possible.

This report contains an overview of the progress and main results in a research project that ran in 2012-2013. The reason for the delay in publication of this final report is that the project owner was declared bankrupt in 2013 and the project has been dormant since then. The authors of the report did however feel obligated to make public the progress and main results that were achieved before the owner went out of business. The aim of the project was to develop best practice for catching, handling, packaging, storage and transport of live whelk; as well as studying the markets for live whelk. Experiments were made with different onboard handling, storage and transport of live whelk. These experiments indicated that it should be possible to keep the whelk alive for one week after capture, with correct handling. The goal had however been to ensure that the whelk could be kept alive for at least ten days. Experiments were also made where it was attempted to keep whelk alive in a regular plastic fish-tub equipped with a circulation system. The objective with this was to examine if whelk could be stored, in a relatively simple and inexpensive manner, in-stock for land-based processing. The results indicate that such a system could be used to keep a living inventory of whelk for the processing. The authors of this report are confident that the timeframe could be extended by fitting the system with more efficient filtration equipment. The markets for live whelk were briefly analyzed and the results of that analyzes indicate that export of live whelk from Iceland is not economically feasible or practical. There is simply too little premium paid for live whelk at the moment.

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Reports

Catching, processing and marketing of Neptune whelk

Published:

01/10/2018

Authors:

Jónas R. Viðarsson, Lúðvík Börkur Jónsson

Supported by:

AVS Research Fund (small project S 12 002-12)

contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Head of Value Creation

jonas@matis.is

Catching, processing and marketing of Neptune whelk

Kingfisher (Neptunea despecta) is a kingfisher that resembles a kingfisher, but is somewhat larger and usually stays at a deeper depth. It is believed that the kingfisher is in large quantities in many parts of the country and that the stock can withstand considerable fishing. The MRI has recorded information about the king of the sea from lobster expeditions for many years, which indicates considerable density in many parts of the country. In 2012, Sægarpur ehf. in Grundarfjörður a grant from the AVS research fund in the Fisheries sector to investigate the possibilities of fishing, processing and exporting kingfishers. This was a so-called small project or preliminary project. The project was divided into work components that involved distribution mapping and experimental fishing, processing experiments, chemical measurements and market research. On the other hand, Sægarpur ehf. became bankrupt during the project period and it can be said that the project has to some extent resurfaced as a result. However, since a large part of the project was completed when Sægarpur went bankrupt, the authors now consider it right and obligatory to publicly report on the progress and main results of the project. In addition, the experiments carried out by the company Royal Iceland hf. has been involved in connection with fishing and processing of sea king, but Royal Iceland bought the assets of Sægarp's bankruptcy estate in 2014 and has since then, among other things, fished and processed bait king. The main results of the mapping of distribution and experimental fishing were rather limited, as information on kingfishers as by-catch in other fisheries is scarce and the species has received little attention in the research of the Marine Research Institute. The experimental expedition led by the project also yielded very little results. The results of processing experiments showed that it is possible to remove the king of the sea's toxic glands and that it is possible to measure whether tetramine (the poison) is found in products, but this does require a considerable cost. The results of a basic market survey indicate that it is possible to sell kingfisher products, especially in well-paying markets in Asia. But since the king of the ocean is not known in Asian markets and there is always a risk of tetramine poisoning, marketing of the products is very difficult. It is clear that there is a need for significantly more research in the entire value chain before it is possible to state whether and how much opportunity there is in fishing and processing kingfishers in this country.

Neptune whelk (Neptunea despecta) is a gastropod that looks a lot like the common whelk, but is though considerably larger and is usually found in deeper water. Neptune whelk is believed to be in significant volume in Icelandic waters, but concreate knowledge on stock size and distribution is however lacking. In 2012 the company Sægarpur ltd., Which was during that time catching, processing and exporting common whelk, received funding from AVS research fund to do some initial investigation on the applicability of catching, processing and marketing Neptune whelk. Sægarpur did however run into bankruptcy before the project ended. The project has therefore been somewhat dormant since 2013. The company Royal Iceland ltd. did though buy the bankrupt estate of Sægarpur and has to a point continued with exploring opportunities in catching and processing Neptune whelk. The authors of this report do now want to make public the progress and main results of the project, even though the project owner (Sægarpur) is no longer in operation. The project was broken into three parts ie mapping of distribution, processing experiments and initial market research. The main results of the mapping exercise showed that very little knowledge is available on distribution of Neptune whelk in Icelandic waters and data on Neptune whelk by-catches is almost noneexistent. The Marine Research Institute has as well awarded very little attention to the species in its research. The project organized a research cruse, where a fishing vessel operating a sea cucumber dredge tried fishing for Neptune whelk in 29 different locations; but with very little success. The results of the processing experiments showed that it is possible to remove the poison glands from the Neptune whelk, bot mechanically and manually. It also showed that the products can be measured for the presence of tetramine (poison). Both the processing and the measurements do however require significant efforts and cost. The initial marketing research indicated that there are likely markets for Neptune whelk products. These markets are primarily in Asia and some of them are high-paying markets. The efforts of Royal Iceland in marketing the Neptune whelk have though shown that this is a difficult product to market, especially because the Neptune whelk is unknown on the Asian markets and there is always a possibility of a tetramine poisoning. It is clear that much more research is necessary throughout the entire value chain before it is possible to say with level of certainty if and how much opportunities are in catching and processing of Neptune whelk in Iceland.

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Reports

Increased value of data

Published:

01/11/2014

Authors:

Páll Gunnar Pálsson

Supported by:

AVS (R 12-026)

Increased value of data

The aim of this project was to come up with a proposal for the preparation of standard product descriptions for Icelandic seafood so that it would be possible to better analyze the products that are exported. It is essential that everyone has a similar understanding of the terms used to describe products. The available information on fishing and exports and status were reviewed, and a glossary with pictures was prepared. A way was set up to create a standard method for creating product descriptions, and subsequently a proposal was made for how information on the exported products can be increased.

The aim of the project was to standardize product description for Icelandic seafood products, as it is very important to have the possibility to analyze the export, value and quantity. Same understanding of the meaning of the words used is necessary. Information about catch and export were analyzed and a dictionary for the various products were made. A new idea for standardizing product description was introduced as well as a new system for registration of exported seafood products.

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Reports

New technology for the Nordic fishing fleet - Proceedings from a workshop on fishing gear and effective catch handling held in Reykjavik October 1st and 2nd 2013

Published:

01/01/2014

Authors:

Jónas R. Viðarsson, Ida Grong Aursand, Hanne Digre, Ulrik Jes Hansen, Leon Smith

Supported by:

AG ‐ fisk (The Nordic Working group for fisheries co ‐ operation)

contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Head of Value Creation

jonas@matis.is

New technology for the Nordic fishing fleet - Proceedings from a workshop on fishing gear and effective catch handling held in Reykjavik October 1st and 2nd 2013

This report presents the presentations held at the Nordic workshop on fishing gear and catch management, held in Reykjavík in October 2013. The report also contains some of the main findings of the meeting and the participants' suggestions for possible follow-up. The presentations published in the report, together with recordings of all presentations and various other topics related to the topic, can be accessed on the website www.fishinggearnetwork.net, which will be maintained at least until the end of 2015.

In this report are published presentations given at a Nordic workshop held in Reykjavik on various aspects of research and development on fishing gear and effective catch handling. The report also accounts for the main outputs from the workshop in regards to possible follow ‐ ups. All of the proceedings, including the content of this report and video recordings of all presentations are available at the project's web ‐ page www.fishinggearnetwork.net which will be maintained at least until the end of year 2015.

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Reports

Lobster trap fishing

Published:

01/09/2013

Authors:

Heather Philp, Vigfús Þórarinn Ásbjörnsson, Ragnheiður Sveinþórsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Reference Number R 043‐10

Lobster trap fishing

In the project, new fishing areas were defined for lobster trapping, they were tested and evaluated for feasibility. An optimal time was also found before the traps were visited after they had been laid. Data showing seasonal fluctuations, both in terms of catches and catch values, were reviewed, and new data were collected and defined. Markets for live lobsters were examined along with prices according to the seasons. The results of the project show that a large lobster is the most common catch in traps in Iceland, in fact the lobster is so large that traditional British packages are too small for it. It is also gratifying that the time of year that seems to be the biggest catch is the time when the highest price is obtained in the markets for live lobsters. New fishing areas that were defined proved to be good and promising for the future.

In the project, new fishing grounds were identified for the purpose of lobster trap fishing. They were explored and assessed. Also, the optimal “soak” time for the fishing was determined. A lot of historical data were explored to show how the catches varied during the year - both catches and the value of the catch - and new data were collected. Markets for live lobster were explored by value and time of year. The results of the project show that big lobsters are the most common catch in traps in Iceland. And in fact, the lobsters are so big that the packaging used for the lobster in the UK is too small. It's positive for Iceland that the time of year when catches are highest coincides with the time of year when prices are the highest too. New fishing grounds were identified which were both productive and promising for the future.

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Reports

Experimental fishing and exploitation of Mueller's pearlsides

Published:

01/10/2012

Authors:

Ragnheiður Sveinþórsdóttir, Margrét Geirsdóttir, Hólmfríður Hartmannsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

contact

Margrét Geirsdóttir

Project Manager

mg@matis.is

Experimental fishing and exploitation of Mueller's pearlsides

Gulldepla has been seen to a small extent off Iceland in recent years, but an unusual amount has been seen off the south coast of Iceland in the winters of 2008/2009 and 2009/2010. Several vessels started trying to catch it in December 2008 and January 2009 with good results and the hearth went into smelting. In the project, various possibilities were considered regarding the utilization of the gold mine and it would be interesting to examine some of them better with regard to the increase in value that they could entail. The possibility of using gold nuggets in surimi, canning, feed in aquaculture, bait, pet treats or the production of bioactive substances was discussed. It was especially interesting to see how light products from gold dust turned out to be when bioactive substances were made from it, compared to the starting raw material and also what taste and smell turned out to be acceptable.

Mueller's pearlside has not historically occurred on Icelandic fishing grounds, but from 2008 pelagic fishers found an increase on the south coast of the country. Exploratory fishing trips were undertaken by a few ships in December 2008 and January 2009. The catch rate was acceptable and the catch was processed into fishmeal. In the project, multiple potential uses for pearlside were investigated and some produced results that indicated it would be worthwhile to research further due to the increased value they may lead to. For example, applications included surimi, canning, aquaculture feed, bait, pet treats or products with bioactivity. The most interesting result was how light the fish protein extracts were compared to the raw mince material when the bioactivity was explored, and also that the taste and smell were very acceptable.

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Reports

Nýting öfugkjöftu til vinnslu sjávarafurða / Opportunities in processing Megrim in Icelandic seafood industry

Published:

01/06/2012

Authors:

Vigfús Ásbjörnsson, Einar Matthíasson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

Nýting öfugkjöftu til vinnslu sjávarafurða / Opportunities in processing Megrim in Icelandic seafood industry

The aim of the project is to lay the foundations for fishing and processing of inverted jaws and to create a basis for economic activity and increased growth based on the utilization of this fish stock. The catchability and price development of inverted jaws in Iceland over months and years were studied. The utilization of the raw material for processing was also studied with the aim of fully utilizing the raw material as much as possible in order to create as much value as possible out of every kg of inverted jaw that arrives in Iceland.

The aim of the project is to analyze and develop knowledge of catching and processing Megrim sole in Iceland and create value from the use of the fish stock. The catching pattern of Megrim sole in Iceland was analyzed depending on years and months in order to recognize the catching pattern over a longer time period as well as the price development on the fishmarket in Iceland. The utilization in land processing of the fish was analyzed with the aim to develop a full utilization method in the land manufacturing process of the fish.

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Reports

Preliminary study on the processing and marketing of Icelandic crabs / Crab; fishing, processing and marketing. Preliminary study

Published:

01/03/2011

Authors:

Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Guðjón Þorkelsson, Davíð Freyr Jónsson, Gunnþórunn Einarsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

contact

Óli Þór Hilmarsson

Project Manager

oli.th.hilmarsson@matis.is

Preliminary study on the processing and marketing of Icelandic crabs / Crab; fishing, processing and marketing. Preliminary study

The project is a preliminary project on experimental fishing and processing of crabs in the Southwest. Experimental fishing resulted in increased knowledge / experience of crab fishing off the coast of Iceland. The crabs that were caught were rock crab, bow crab and crayfish. Work was done on proposals for procedures and quality rules / guidelines for crab fishing in Iceland. Efficacy procedures for the killing of crabs were developed. Products from other processing processes were also introduced, such as whole frozen, boiled and frozen whole, also clustered and frozen or divided, boiled and frozen. Experimental marketing of crabs in Iceland was successful and better than expected at the beginning of the project.

This was a preliminary study on catching and processing of crab in Southwest Iceland. Knowledge and experience on how, where and when to catch crab was gained. The crabs that were caught were Atlantic rock crab, common shore crab and common spider crab. The first recommendations on procedures and quality guidelines for catching crab were issued. Processes for killing crab were adapted from other countries and the products were developed eg frozen whole crab, boiled and frozen whole crab, portioned (cluster) and frozen or portioned, boiled and frozen. The preliminary marketing of the crabs in Iceland was more successful than expected.

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Reports

Fishing, grading, processing and marketing of mackerel caught by pelagic vessels / Fishing, grading, processing and marketing of mackerel caught by pelagic vessels

Published:

01/03/2011

Authors:

Ragnheiður Sveinþórsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

Fishing, grading, processing and marketing of mackerel caught by pelagic vessels / Fishing, grading, processing and marketing of mackerel caught by pelagic vessels

In 2005, mackerel catches were first registered in Icelandic jurisdiction, although Icelandic vessels did not start fishing for mackerel systematically until 2007, mackerel fishing increased rapidly, but in 2009 fishing rights for mackerel were first limited. During these years, the catch has gone from 232 tonnes to 121 thousand tonnes. Initially, all the catch went to smelting, but in 2010 Icelanders froze 60% of the catch for human consumption. This report discusses fishing and processing of mackerel, equipment needed for mackerel processing for human consumption, handling of catch, measurements of mackerel caught in Icelandic jurisdiction and the market. In the project, samples were collected and measured in shape, gender and fat content. In the summer, mackerel enter Icelandic jurisdiction and are caught with herring, but both species are caught in trawls. When mackerel is processed for human consumption, it is decapitated and gutted, but in order to do so, in addition to the traditional processing line, so-called suction is needed, which sucks the slag from inside the mackerel. Mackerel also needs a longer freezing time than herring due to its cylindrical shape. The mackerel that enters Icelandic waters is often 35-40 cm long and weighs between 300 and 600 g. The main markets for summer-caught mackerel caught in Iceland are in Eastern Europe, where it continues to be processed into more valuable products.

In the year 2005 Icelanders first caught mackerel in Icelandic fishing grounds, but it was not until 2007 that Icelandic vessels began to catch mackerel by purpose. The fishing of mackerel increased fast but in 2009 the government put a limit on the catching. In these years the catch has increased from 232 tons to 121,000 tons. At first, a meal was made from all the catch, but in 2010 60% of the catch was frozen for human consumption. The subject of this report is the fishing and processing of mackerel, mechanisms that are needed to process the mackerel for human consumption, handling of the catch, measurement of mackerels and markets. For this project samples were collected and geometrician measurements performed by qualified staff. In the summer mackerel can be caught in Icelandic fishing grounds together with herring, it´s caught in pelagic trawl. When mackerel are processed for human consumption it´s headed and gutted, to do that a suck has to be used to suck the guts out. Mackerel also need longer time in the freezing device because of their cylindrical shape. The mackerel caught here are often 35‐40 cm long and 300‐600 g of weight. The main markets for mackerel caught during the summer are in Eastern Europe where it's processed into more valuable products.

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Reports

Fishing and processing of live nephros for exportation

Published:

01/12/2009

Authors:

Guðmundur Heiðar Gunnarsson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

Fishing and processing of live nephros for exportation

This was a pilot project aimed at defining conditions for efficient export of live lobsters. The project spanned the process from fishing to lobster marketing in Europe. The project succeeded in defining conditions for bringing live lobster from Hornafjörður to the market in Southern Europe. It was shown that it is possible to catch lobster in trawls for live export if it is ensured that precise quality categories take place on board the fishing vessel. Work processes were defined as minimizing discounts for short-term storage of lobster on land and for transport to the European market. A comparison with comparable Danish studies showed that survival was better in our process or 66% compared to 53%. However, there were higher discounts due to hake during trawling on Icelandic vessels, but this was supplemented by three times higher survival when transported ashore and short-term storage ashore (96 hours). It was shown that lobsters could be kept alive without discounts for up to 48 hours when transported to a foreign market. It was estimated that lobsters would need to live for at least 37 hours. in transit to reach the consumer in Europe. Prices in foreign markets were in line with market analysis. The project has therefore defined a work process that can be built on to start selling live lobster on the market in Southern Europe. However, it is necessary to master the catch of lobster traps in order to increase survival even further and reduce time-consuming sorting work in the process.

This research project was initiated to define conditions for optimized export procedure for Icelandic live nephrops. The project was based on holistic approach spanning the progress from catching nephrops to marketing of the live product in Europe. We were able to define conditions allowing for live export nephrops from Hornafjordur to Europe. We showed that it is possible to export live trawl fished nephrops but only after rigorous quality assessment. We defined workflow allowing for high survival rate of live nephrops during transportation and storage prior to exporting. Comparison with similar Danish project revealed that our setup allowed for higher survival rate or 66% compared to 53%. The survival rate after Icelandic trawl catching was lower than after Danish trawl catching. Survival rate during transportation and short time storage (96 hours) was three times higher in our setup. It was possible to keep nephrops alive for 48 hours in the export packaging, while it was assumed that such export would typically take up to 37 hours. Prices obtained in the pilot marketing tests were in the price range expected based on our marketing analysis. We have therefore defined a procedure suitable for initiating commercial export of live nephrops to Europe. However it is critical to build up capacity for creeling of nephrops in Icelandic waters to ensure higher survival rates and longer storage time of the live products. This would also reduce the extensive quality assessment needed if the nephrops is trawled.

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