Reports

Hunting, processing and exporting of live bait king

Published:

06/12/2018

Authors:

Jónas R. Viðarsson, Ásbjörn Jónsson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund (V 11005-11)

contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Head of Value Creation

jonas@matis.is

Hunting, processing and exporting of live bait king

This report outlines the implementation and main results of a research project that took place in the years 2012-2013. The reason for delaying the publication of the final report of the project is that in 2013 the owner of the project, Sægarpur ehf. bankrupt. The project was therefore not completed and has been largely dormant since 2013. However, since most of the project had been completed before Sægarpur went bankrupt, the authors consider it right and obligatory to publicly report here what took place in the project and what the main results are. its were. The aim of the project was to develop fishing, processing, storage and transport of live bait kingfishers, as well as to explore the market for such products. Experiments were carried out with different catch treatments on board a fishing vessel and storage or transport, which gave indications that with the right handling and finishing it would be possible to keep the bait king alive for approx. week. the aim had been to ensure at least 10 days of survival in order for it to be considered realistic to intend to export a live bait king. However, the results of the experiments showed that when more than a week had passed since the hunt, survival decreased rapidly and the meat had become unfit for consumption on the tenth day. It is possible that these processes could be better developed to ensure better survival, but based on these results, the shelf life is not long enough to be considered a viable option at this time. Attempts were also made to keep the bait king alive in a cycle system in a fish tank. The aim of these experiments was to investigate whether it was possible to store live bait king in a "warehouse" for processing on land. A circuit system was equipped with filter equipment that was sufficient to keep the bait king alive for a week. The authors believe that it would be possible to extend the time with more powerful filtering equipment. These results must be considered positive and conducive to the fact that they could be taken up by companies that process bait king. Markets for live bait king were also examined, but it can be said that this survey has finally brought home the truth that the export of live bait king is not a viable option. It is simply a better option to win the bait king here at home. If market conditions change, however, it is not ruled out that processes can be improved to make such exports possible.

This report contains an overview of the progress and main results in a research project that ran in 2012-2013. The reason for the delay in publication of this final report is that the project owner was declared bankrupt in 2013 and the project has been dormant since then. The authors of the report did however feel obligated to make public the progress and main results that were achieved before the owner went out of business. The aim of the project was to develop best practice for catching, handling, packaging, storage and transport of live whelk; as well as studying the markets for live whelk. Experiments were made with different onboard handling, storage and transport of live whelk. These experiments indicated that it should be possible to keep the whelk alive for one week after capture, with correct handling. The goal had however been to ensure that the whelk could be kept alive for at least ten days. Experiments were also made where it was attempted to keep whelk alive in a regular plastic fish-tub equipped with a circulation system. The objective with this was to examine if whelk could be stored, in a relatively simple and inexpensive manner, in-stock for land-based processing. The results indicate that such a system could be used to keep a living inventory of whelk for the processing. The authors of this report are confident that the timeframe could be extended by fitting the system with more efficient filtration equipment. The markets for live whelk were briefly analyzed and the results of that analyzes indicate that export of live whelk from Iceland is not economically feasible or practical. There is simply too little premium paid for live whelk at the moment.

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Reports

Changes in visual and textural quality in the redfish species (Sebastes marinus) during different storage regimes / Attempts against spot formation in fresh redfish fillets

Published:

01/11/2014

Authors:

Heather Philp, Ragnheiður Sveinþórsdóttir, Anna Hjaltadóttir

Supported by:

AVS (V 11 019-11)

Changes in visual and textural quality in the redfish species (Sebastes marinus) during different storage regimes / Attempts against spot formation in fresh redfish fillets

The fish species Sebastes marinus or redfish as it is called in everyday speech was the subject of this project where the goal was to find the cause and solve the problem of spotting fresh redfish fillets. These spots that form on fresh redfish fillets are yellowish and form within five days of processing the fillets, which creates problems due to their transport time and reduces their quality due to visual effects. The research carried out in the project covers the five days that the spot takes to form. In experiments to prevent the formation of stains, fresh redfish fillets were packed in a foam box where a mat on the bottom released carbon dioxide during the simulated transport and on the other hand the fillets were packed one by one in vacuum-packed containers. was also a mat under which emitted carbon dioxide. The results were that this packaging of the fillets prevented the oxidation of lipids in the flesh, but both the visual effect and the texture of the fillets deteriorated. Another experiment was performed where a redfish was bled as soon as it was taken on board the fishing vessel and compared with a redfish that came ashore unbleached (as usual) over a five-day period. The results were that the spots were less noticeable in the fish that had been bled on board the fishing vessel. The end result was that the probable cause of these yellowish spots that form on fresh redfish fillets is related to the breakdown of pigments that contain iron such as hemoglobin and myoglobin.

The species Sebastes marinus, commonly known as redfish, is the subject of a series of experiments aimed at determining the cause and mitigation of the appearance of yellowish stains on the surface of processed fillets. These detract from the visual quality and occur within five days of processing, thus precluding their transport to customer by sea and reducing their potential value. An investigation of progression described the appearance of the staining over a five day period. An attempt to prevent the staining was carried out by packing the fillets in two forms of modified atmosphere, one where the fillets were maintained in standard boxes with the addition of carbon dioxide releasing pads, and one where the fillets were individually sealed in vacuum bags with carbon dioxide releasing pads. It was found that the packaging prevented oxidation of lipids in the muscle but the visual and textural quality was greatly reduced. A further investigation monitored the appearance of stains in fish that had previously been bled at sea. It was found that the yellowish stains were less apparent in the bled fish compared to those that had not been bled. In addition, the textural quality was again reduced suggesting this may be a most suitable method for improving the quality such that the fresh fillets may be transported by sea. It is proposed that the likely cause is related to the breakdown of ironcontaining pigments such as haemoglobin and myoglobin.

Report closed until 01.12.2016

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Reports

Increased value of data

Published:

01/11/2014

Authors:

Páll Gunnar Pálsson

Supported by:

AVS (R 12-026)

Increased value of data

The aim of this project was to come up with a proposal for the preparation of standard product descriptions for Icelandic seafood so that it would be possible to better analyze the products that are exported. It is essential that everyone has a similar understanding of the terms used to describe products. The available information on fishing and exports and status were reviewed, and a glossary with pictures was prepared. A way was set up to create a standard method for creating product descriptions, and subsequently a proposal was made for how information on the exported products can be increased.

The aim of the project was to standardize product description for Icelandic seafood products, as it is very important to have the possibility to analyze the export, value and quantity. Same understanding of the meaning of the words used is necessary. Information about catch and export were analyzed and a dictionary for the various products were made. A new idea for standardizing product description was introduced as well as a new system for registration of exported seafood products.

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Reports

Comparison of packaging methods for bulk storage of fresh cod loins / Comparison of packaging solutions in foam packaging for storage of cod products

Published:

01/08/2013

Authors:

Hélène L. Lauzon, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Eyjólfur Reynisson, Björn Margeirsson

Supported by:

Promens Tempra ehf, Umbúðir og ráðgjöf ehf

contact

Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir

Sensory evaluation manager

adalheiduro@matis.is

Comparison of packaging methods for bulk storage of fresh cod loins / Comparison of packaging solutions in foam packaging for storage of cod products

The main objective of the experiment was to compare packaging solutions for fish in terms of quality deterioration and product temperature during storage, which is similar to the conditions for export and distribution. The objectives were to compare cold storage of products packed (1) in 5-kg units in (H1) ship or (H2) air boxes; (2) in 3 ‐ kg units in (H3) airbags compared to H2; (3) with CO2 mats (H4) to reduce microbial growth in 5 kg units stored under 93% vacuum in EPS boxes. The results show that the lifespan of H1 was shorter, but there were smaller quality changes among the other groups. However, the freshness was longest and the lifespan of H4, which compares with slower TVB-N and TMA formation and microbial growth due to CO2 formation as well as lower product temperature. The fastest microbial growth was measured in H3 after 8 days of storage. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of TVB-N and TMA values, which were highest in H1 and H3. Drip was at least half as high in H4 as in other groups.

The overall aim of the storage study was to compare the quality deterioration and temperature profile of cod loins differently packaged in expanded polystyrene boxes and stored under conditions mimicking distribution. The purpose of the study was threefold; to compare chilled storage (1) or 5 ‐ kg bulk fish packaged in sea freight (H1) or air freight (H2) boxes; (2) of 3 ‐ kg (H3) or 5 ‐ kg (H2) bulk fish packaged in air freight boxes; (3) with the use of CO2 ‐ emitting pads (H4) as a mean to slow down bacterial deterioration of cod loins (5 kg) packaged under partial vacuum and stored in EPS boxes. The results clearly indicated that group H1 had a shorter shelf life as it developed spoilage characteristics faster than the other three groups. Less difference was seen between the remaining three groups but group H4 retained its freshness slightly longer than groups H2 and H3. This can be explained by the CO2 present and the lower mean product temperature. More advanced microbial spoilage was detected in H3 group compared to H2, as shown by higher microbial counts in H3 being though insignificant. No significant differences were observed after 8 ‐ day storage in TVB ‐ N and TMA content of the four groups, despite the higher levels measured in H1 and H3. Drip loss was at least two times higher in H4 than the other groups.

Closed Report

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Reports

Effect of temperature control on the efficiency of modified atmosphere packaging of cod loins in bulk

Published:

01/06/2011

Authors:

Hélène L. Lauzon, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir, Magnea G. Karlsdóttir, Eyjólfur Reynisson, Björn Margeirsson, Emilia Martinsdóttir

Supported by:

EU IP Chill ‐ on (contract FP6‐016333‐2)

contact

Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir

Project Manager

kolbrun.sveinsdottir@matis.is

Effect of temperature control on the efficiency of modified atmosphere packaging of cod loins in bulk

The aim of the experiment was to compare the freshness, quality and shelf life of sub-chilled (CBC) cod necks in air storage and in aerated packages (MAP) at controlled temperatures to simulate temperature fluctuations during transport and distribution in the European market. Changes in the composition of the gas in the packages were monitored and sensory assessments and microbial and chemical measurements were performed. The fish was caught in bottom trawls in the spring and processed three days after fishing. There was a two-day prolongation during the freshness period and one day for the shelf life of fish in aerated packages (2.7 kg in a tray) compared to air (3.1 kg) in foam plastic, despite a 0.5 ° C difference in the average temperature of the groups and the air group was stored at lower temperatures (‐0.3 ± 0.9 ° C). The greatest temperature fluctuations led to the greatest shortening of the freshness time in air-conditioned packages. Cod saddles stored subcooled at -1.1 ± 0.1 ° C had a shelf life of 13 days. The results of microbial counts and chemical measurements showed the importance of Photobacterium phosphoreum in the formation of TMA in the process of damaging cod necks during both air and air exchange packaging. MAP and subcooling slowed down and changed the damage process. MAP increased drip by 2% in the later stages of storage.

The aim of this study was to compare freshness, quality deterioration and shelf life of CBC (combined blast and contact) ‐treated cod loins packaged in bulk under different atmospheres (air or modified atmosphere, MA) and stored under different temperature profiles to mimic temperature changes during transport and distribution to European markets. Sensory, chemical, microbial and headspace gas composition analyzes were performed regularly. The fish was caught by trawler in the spring and processed 3 days post catch. Following simulation of current sea freight conditions and distribution to European markets, a 2 ‐ day and 1 ‐ day increase in freshness period and shelf life of MA ‐ packaged fish (2.7 kg in trays), respectively, was observed compared to air ‐ stored loins (3.1 kg in EPS boxes). This is despite a mean product temperature difference of 0.5 ° C between the products, being lower (‐0.3 ± 0.9 ° C) for air ‐ stored fish. Abusive conditions had the greatest impact on the reduction of the freshness period for MAP fish. Superchilled storage of MAP loins (‐1.1 ± 0.1 ° C) resulted in a 13 ‐ day shelf life. Evaluation of microbial and chemical indicators emphasized the importance of Photobacterium phosphoreum and TMA formation in the deterioration of cod loins stored in air or MA, while superchilled MAP storage delayed as well as modified the spoilage pattern. MAP increased drip loss by about 2% at late storage.

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Reports

Use of saithe in ready-made fish products / Using saithe in ready to eat fish product

Published:

01/03/2010

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Guðjón Þorkelsson, Irek Klonowski

Supported by:

AVS Fund / R 09075‐09

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Use of saithe in ready-made fish products / Using saithe in ready to eat fish product

Almost all saithe caught off Iceland is exported little processed, especially to Europe and the United States. There, it is largely processed into consumer products, which results in a considerable increase in value. It is important to explore ways to increase the value of exported saithe. By processing the saithe in full or for the most part in consumer products in Iceland, a higher proportion of the increase in value is passed on to domestic parties. In this summary, emphasis is placed on market conditions and the main production methods of breaded fish products, which have long been one of the most common further processing of Icelandic saithe abroad. Today there are market opportunities for products that are at a favorable price, of good quality, convenient and fast. Breaded saithe products fit well with these consumer demands. When a positive image of Icelandic food is added from an environmental point of view, it can be estimated that there are good opportunities for marketing Icelandic consumer products abroad. However, it is important to keep in mind to choose and know the market you are aiming for. Breaded fish is considered a relatively traditional food, but the variability within the product is considerable and much depends on the tastes of consumers in each country.

Most of the saithe caught in Icelandic waters is exported as raw material, mostly to Europe and the USA, where it is further processed to consumer products of higher value. In this summation emphasis is put on the market situation and processing methods of breaded fish products, which are probably the most common end ‐ product of Icelandic saithe abroad. Today is an opportunity for marketing of products which are economical, of high quality, convenient and quick to serve. Breaded fish products fulfill those requirements by ensuring raw material quality, processing and handling conditions. Great variety is within this product category which is now categorized as conventional food. Local preferences can vary greatly. Thorough selection and knowledge of markets is essential. There is a great potential for further processing of saithe into consumer products for export within Iceland due to proximity to the raw material and local knowledge of handling, ensuring the quality of the product. By further processing of the raw material higher proportion of the value of the final product will fall to the local producers, increasing the export value of saithe caught in Icelandic waters.     

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Reports

Use of saithe in ready-made fish products - final report / Using saithe in ready to eat fish product - final report

Published:

01/03/2010

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Irek Klonowski, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

AVS-sjóðurinn / R 09075-09

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Use of saithe in ready-made fish products - final report / Using saithe in ready to eat fish product - final report

Almost all saithe caught off Iceland is exported little processed, especially to Europe and the United States. There, it is largely processed into consumer products, which results in a considerable increase in value. It is important to explore ways to increase the value of exported saithe. By processing the saithe in full or for the most part in consumer products in Iceland, a higher proportion of the increase in value is passed on to domestic parties. The project focused on methods for baking, which has long been one of the most common processing methods for Icelandic saithe abroad. The project got off to a good start and was soon contacted by potential buyers in Germany. Samples of products were sent to them for an assessment of how best to develop the product to their liking. Several experiments were carried out which indicated that the product development was on the right track. On the other hand, when the work progressed well, it was clear that Festarhald's operating basis was very uncertain and the company soon went into moratorium. Although the project developed in a different way than expected, the results of the experiments indicated that the products tested were of acceptable quality and likely to meet market requirements. There is therefore every reason to estimate that there is a basis for processing processed saithe products from saithe in this country. Today there are opportunities for products that are at a favorable price, of good quality, convenient and fast. Breaded saithe products fit well with these consumer demands. When a positive image of Icelandic food is added from an environmental point of view, it can be estimated that there are good opportunities for marketing Icelandic consumer products abroad.

Most of the saithe caught in Icelandic waters is exported as raw material, especially to Europe and the USA, where it is further processed to consumer products of higher value. In the project, analysis was performed on the potential of processing breaded fish products by a local processing plant. Results of experiments were positive and indicated that the products fulfilled market demands of composition and quality. There is a great potential for further processing of saithe into consumer products for export due to proximity to the raw material and local knowledge of handling, ensuring the quality of the product. By further processing of the raw material higher proportion of the value of the final product will fall to the local producers, increasing the export value of saithe caught in Icelandic waters.

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Reports

Fishing and processing of live nephros for exportation

Published:

01/12/2009

Authors:

Guðmundur Heiðar Gunnarsson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

Fishing and processing of live nephros for exportation

This was a pilot project aimed at defining conditions for efficient export of live lobsters. The project spanned the process from fishing to lobster marketing in Europe. The project succeeded in defining conditions for bringing live lobster from Hornafjörður to the market in Southern Europe. It was shown that it is possible to catch lobster in trawls for live export if it is ensured that precise quality categories take place on board the fishing vessel. Work processes were defined as minimizing discounts for short-term storage of lobster on land and for transport to the European market. A comparison with comparable Danish studies showed that survival was better in our process or 66% compared to 53%. However, there were higher discounts due to hake during trawling on Icelandic vessels, but this was supplemented by three times higher survival when transported ashore and short-term storage ashore (96 hours). It was shown that lobsters could be kept alive without discounts for up to 48 hours when transported to a foreign market. It was estimated that lobsters would need to live for at least 37 hours. in transit to reach the consumer in Europe. Prices in foreign markets were in line with market analysis. The project has therefore defined a work process that can be built on to start selling live lobster on the market in Southern Europe. However, it is necessary to master the catch of lobster traps in order to increase survival even further and reduce time-consuming sorting work in the process.

This research project was initiated to define conditions for optimized export procedure for Icelandic live nephrops. The project was based on holistic approach spanning the progress from catching nephrops to marketing of the live product in Europe. We were able to define conditions allowing for live export nephrops from Hornafjordur to Europe. We showed that it is possible to export live trawl fished nephrops but only after rigorous quality assessment. We defined workflow allowing for high survival rate of live nephrops during transportation and storage prior to exporting. Comparison with similar Danish project revealed that our setup allowed for higher survival rate or 66% compared to 53%. The survival rate after Icelandic trawl catching was lower than after Danish trawl catching. Survival rate during transportation and short time storage (96 hours) was three times higher in our setup. It was possible to keep nephrops alive for 48 hours in the export packaging, while it was assumed that such export would typically take up to 37 hours. Prices obtained in the pilot marketing tests were in the price range expected based on our marketing analysis. We have therefore defined a procedure suitable for initiating commercial export of live nephrops to Europe. However it is critical to build up capacity for creeling of nephrops in Icelandic waters to ensure higher survival rates and longer storage time of the live products. This would also reduce the extensive quality assessment needed if the nephrops is trawled.

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Reports

Fishing, sorting, processing and markets for mackerel caught by pelagic vessels. Markaður / Fishing, grading, pre ‐ processing, processing and marketing of mackerel products catches by pelagic vessels. Markets

Published:

01/01/2009

Authors:

Ragnheiður Sveinþórsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS

Fishing, sorting, processing and markets for mackerel caught by pelagic vessels. Markaður / Fishing, grading, pre ‐ processing, processing and marketing of mackerel products catches by pelagic vessels. Markets

The aim of this project is to study the fishing of pelagic fishing vessels for mackerel in Icelandic waters, make formal measurements, come up with solutions on how to sort the mackerel from other fish on board and how to process it in freezer vessels. The equipment options necessary for the processing will be analyzed, and markets for mackerel caught in Icelandic waters will also be explored according to the seasons. In this section, markets for mackerel products are described. The main exporters and main buyers are covered. The two largest exporting nations are also deepening their exports in terms of products and prices.

The objective of this project is to examine mackerel fishing on Icelandic fishing grounds, perform geometrician measurements, find the best solution for grading the mackerel by size and species on board and how to process it in freezer vessels. Analyze what kind of technology is necessary. Moreover, to examine the markets for mackerel caught on Icelandic fishing grounds during the summer. In this part requirements analysis was carried out about what is needed to process mackerel on board vessels caught during summertime on Icelandic fishing grounds. In this section the focus is on markets for mackerel products. The focus is on exporters and buyers and also more about exports and prices at the two biggest export nations for mackerel products.

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