Reports

Seaweed supplementation to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions by cattle

Published:

27/09/2021

Authors:

Dr. Ásta H. Pétursdóttir (Matís), Dr. Helga Gunnlaugsdóttir (Matís), Natasa Desnica (Matís), Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir (Matís), Susanne Kuenzel (University of Hohenheim), Dr. Markus Rodehutscord (University of Hohenheim), Dr. Chris Reynolds (University of Reading), Dr. David Humphries (University of Reading), James Draper (ABP).

Supported by:

EIT Food

contact

Ásta Heiðrún E. Pétursdóttir

Head of Public Health and Food Safety

asta.h.petursdottir@matis.is

SeaCH4NGE results include a detailed analysis of the chemical composition of seaweed, including heavy metals and nutritional composition. Iodine concentration proved to be the main limiting factor regarding seaweed as a feed supplement. The decrease in methane observed in laboratory methane production experiments (in vitro) is likely due to compounds called fluorotannin rather than bromoform, a known substance that can reduce methane production in ruminants. In vitro screening of the seaweed showed a moderate decrease in methane, but lower methane production was dependent on seaweed species. The reduction was dose-dependent, ie by using more algae, a greater methane reduction could be seen in vitro. The same two types of seaweed were used in the Rusitec experiment (in vitro), which is a very comprehensive analysis that provides further information. An in-vivo study in cows showed that feeding cattle with a mixture of brown algae has a relatively small effect on methane emissions. However, fluorotannins are known to have other beneficial effects when consumed by ruminants. The report also includes a survey of British cow farmers' attitudes towards algae feeding and climate change.

Skýrslan er lokuð / This report is closed

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Reports

Seaweed supplementation to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions by cattle (SeaCH4NGE-PLUS)

Published:

17/09/2021

Authors:

Matís: Ásta H Pétursdóttir, Brynja Einarsdóttir, Elísabet Eik Guðmundsdóttir, Natasa Desnica, Rebecca Sim. University of Hohenheim: Susanne Kuenzel, Markus Rodehutscord, Natascha Titze, Katharina Wild.

Supported by:

Climate Fund, Rannís

contact

Ásta Heiðrún E. Pétursdóttir

Head of Public Health and Food Safety

asta.h.petursdottir@matis.is

This report contains the main experimental results of the SeaCH4NGE-PLUS project. In short, screening of the chemical content showed approx. 20 algae species collected in Iceland in 2020 and 2021, not bromoform-rich seaweed, but bromoform-rich seaweed can have a methane-reducing effect when given to cattle. Samples of brown algae were often high in phenol content, indicating a high fluorotannin content that has been linked to moderate methane reduction. Studies on Asparagopsis algae. indicated that these samples could have a short shelf life, but the effect was smaller than expected. Fermentation can have a small positive effect on methane production (ie slightly reduce production), but the extraction of the florotannin did not have a decisive effect on methane production. This report is closed until 31.12.2023.

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Reports

Seaweed that improves feed for dairy cows

Published:

22/09/2021

Authors:

Ásta Heiðrún Pétursdóttir, Corentin Beaumal, Gunnar Ríkharðsson, Helga Gunnlaugsdóttir

Supported by:

Agricultural Productivity Fund, Student Innovation Fund

contact

Ásta Heiðrún E. Pétursdóttir

Head of Public Health and Food Safety

asta.h.petursdottir@matis.is

The aim was to investigate whether it would be possible to increase the usefulness of dairy cows by seaweed feeding and to examine the chemical content and quality of the milk. Also whether it would be possible to use seaweed as a mineral source, for example for organic feed that could lead to a new product such as high-fat milk and therefore encourage innovation in
cattle breeding. The results showed that seaweed administration could have a positive effect
on milk production as the groups receiving seaweed showed a slight increase in milk production compared to the control group,
but the change was not significant. The results of the collection samples showed that the trace composition changed. Seaweed supplementation could be, for example
an interesting option for farmers who are interested in or already engaged
organic production but interest in organic farming is increasing among cattle breeders.

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Reports

Algae products. Hugmyndir að vörum / Food products from seaweed

Published:

01/06/2011

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Karl Gunnarsson

Supported by:

AVS

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Algae products. Hugmyndir að vörum / Food products from seaweed

Today, the large algae that are used for food in this country are mainly sold dried and processed. There has been little development in their processing and operation to this day. In order to encourage increased utilization and innovation in this field, information was collected on products of large algae on the market in other countries. What particularly hinders the growth of the food algae market here in Iceland and in the neighboring countries is that the tradition for their use has been limited to small and limited social groups. There are therefore many consumers who know little about the use of food algae and more often than not have a negative attitude towards them. The transfer of more traditional vegetable processing methods to algae and mixing in known, general, products such as pasta and rice or in prepared dishes can be a way of introducing food algae to a larger group of consumers.

Today seaweed exploited for food production in Iceland is mainly sold dried and / or cured according to tradition. With the aim to stimulate utilization and innovation in the sector, information was collected on seaweed products in several countries.

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Reports

Gold in the fists of Ægis / Antioxidants from Icelandic marine sources

Published:

01/05/2010

Authors:

Rósa Jónsdóttir, Patricia Hamaguchi, Guðrún Ólafsdóttir, Tao Wang

Supported by:

AVS R&D Fund of Ministry of Fisheries in Iceland

contact

Rósa Jónsdóttir

Group Leader

rosa.jonsdottir@matis.is

Gold in the fists of Ægis / Antioxidants from Icelandic marine sources

The purpose of this project was to screen for anti-corrosive substances from Icelandic seafood such as algae, capelin and sagebrush, to be used as a food additive, target food or as a dietary supplement. Particular attention was paid to the possible use of polyphenols from algae as natural antioxidants to prevent the development of fish products and fish muscle proteins (isolates). This was done by screening for antioxidant activity with several types of antioxidant tests. The most promising antioxidant was chosen to better study its antioxidant properties in food models, i.e. washed cod muscle system, cod protein system and in fish burgers. The results showed, among other things, that polyphenols from the seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus) have high antioxidant properties and are promising for use as a dietary supplement or in food to promote greater stability, taste and nutritional value.

The aim of this project was to explore the natural antioxidant activity of marine sources like seaweed, capelin and cod spleen to use as food additives, functional ingredients or nutritional supplements. The potential application of algal polyphenols as novel natural antioxidants to prevent lipid oxidation of fish muscle and fish protein based products was of special interest. This was done by screening for antioxidant activity using different types of antioxidant assays. The most promising antioxidants were selected and their antioxidant properties studied further in fish model systems and fish patties. The results showed that phlorotannins isolated from bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus) had very high antioxidant properties and has a potential as nutritional supplements or food additive to enhance oxidative stability, flavor quality and nutritional value.

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Reports

"Fat is the bait" - bait from fishery byproducts

Published:

01/11/2007

Authors:

Rósa Jónsdóttir, Soffía Vala Tryggvadóttir, Margrét Bragadóttir, Haraldur Einarsson, Höskuldur Björnsson, Sveinbjörn Jónsson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

contact

Rósa Jónsdóttir

Group Leader

rosa.jonsdottir@matis.is

"Fat is the bait" - bait from fishery byproducts

The aim of the project was to develop and produce composite baits for longline fishing from underutilized raw materials with newly developed snow technology that has been granted a patent. The chemical composition of bait raw material and the use of algae as antidote in bait were examined, in addition to which fishing experiments were carried out. In connection with the project, an application machine was designed and built, and experiments carried out with it in the spring of 2007 ended with 97% application. The use of algae as an antioxidant in bait was not very effective. The bait was quite developed right at the beginning of the storage experiment, so most likely the algae did not work properly. Vitamin C ice cream coating seemed to provide some protection, although vacuum packaging was most important. Many of the experiments that were carried out on the bait aimed to compare the bait with traditional baits made from the same material. Usually, less power was obtained from the bag bait, which can be traced in part to storage, but more problems are needed for storing bag bait than conventional bait. These experiments aim to test whether the bag bait has any repellent effect on fish approaching it. When interpreting the results, however, it must be borne in mind that raw material can be used in bag bait that cannot be used in traditional bait, better utilization of bait raw material is obtained and it is probably best for bag bait to be frozen in the sea. Towards the end of the project, fishing experiments indicated that bag bait yielded similar catches as traditional bait. During the last fishing trip in November 2006, haddock catches were better on bag bait than normal bait, but a flaw in the set-up of the experiment somewhat diminishes the veracity of the result. In addition, vitamin C-fortified bag bait gave slightly more catch than bag bait without vitamin C.

The aim of the project was to develop and produce effective bait for long line fishing from under-utilized raw material using newly developed snow technology that has been patented. The chemical composition of bait raw material and the use of seaweed as an antioxidant in the bait were studied and fishing experiments were done. In connection with the project a baiting machine was designed and produced. Experiments using the machine gave 97% of baited hooks. The use of seaweed as an antioxidant was not successful. The antioxidant activity of the seaweed was probably limited because the bait raw material was already oxidized in the beginning of the storage study. Icing the bait with vitamin C did give some protection although the most important factor seems to be the vacuum packaging. The aim of the fishing experiment was to study the attractiveness of the artificial bait. Most of the fishing experiments were done by studding the artificial bait against the traditional bait using the same raw material. The catch was often less from the artificial bait compared to traditional bait. This can possibly be explained by lower storage stability of the artificial bait due to oxidation. Using artificial bait mainly based on waste from fish processing plants and / or pelagic fish instead of expensive traditional bait material is however promising. The latest fishing experiments showed better results given similar catch for both the artificial and traditional bait. In the last experiment in November 2006 the haddock catch was better for the artificial bait that the traditional bait although it has to be mentioned that the experimental design was incomplete. Artificial bait with vitamin C added gave also better result than the artificial bait without vitamin C.

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