Reports

Seaweed supplementation to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions by cattle

Published:

27/09/2021

Authors:

Dr. Ásta H. Pétursdóttir (Matís), Dr. Helga Gunnlaugsdóttir (Matís), Natasa Desnica (Matís), Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir (Matís), Susanne Kuenzel (University of Hohenheim), Dr. Markus Rodehutscord (University of Hohenheim), Dr. Chris Reynolds (University of Reading), Dr. David Humphries (University of Reading), James Draper (ABP).

Supported by:

EIT Food

contact

Ásta Heiðrún E. Pétursdóttir

Head of Public Health and Food Safety

asta.h.petursdottir@matis.is

SeaCH4NGE results include a detailed analysis of the chemical composition of seaweed, including heavy metals and nutritional composition. Iodine concentration proved to be the main limiting factor regarding seaweed as a feed supplement. The decrease in methane observed in laboratory methane production experiments (in vitro) is likely due to compounds called fluorotannin rather than bromoform, a known substance that can reduce methane production in ruminants. In vitro screening of the seaweed showed a moderate decrease in methane, but lower methane production was dependent on seaweed species. The reduction was dose-dependent, ie by using more algae, a greater methane reduction could be seen in vitro. The same two types of seaweed were used in the Rusitec experiment (in vitro), which is a very comprehensive analysis that provides further information. An in-vivo study in cows showed that feeding cattle with a mixture of brown algae has a relatively small effect on methane emissions. However, fluorotannins are known to have other beneficial effects when consumed by ruminants. The report also includes a survey of British cow farmers' attitudes towards algae feeding and climate change.

Skýrslan er lokuð / This report is closed

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Reports

Seaweed supplementation to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions by cattle (SeaCH4NGE-PLUS)

Published:

17/09/2021

Authors:

Matís: Ásta H Pétursdóttir, Brynja Einarsdóttir, Elísabet Eik Guðmundsdóttir, Natasa Desnica, Rebecca Sim. University of Hohenheim: Susanne Kuenzel, Markus Rodehutscord, Natascha Titze, Katharina Wild.

Supported by:

Climate Fund, Rannís

contact

Ásta Heiðrún E. Pétursdóttir

Head of Public Health and Food Safety

asta.h.petursdottir@matis.is

This report contains the main experimental results of the SeaCH4NGE-PLUS project. In short, screening of the chemical content showed approx. 20 algae species collected in Iceland in 2020 and 2021, not bromoform-rich seaweed, but bromoform-rich seaweed can have a methane-reducing effect when given to cattle. Samples of brown algae were often high in phenol content, indicating a high fluorotannin content that has been linked to moderate methane reduction. Studies on Asparagopsis algae. indicated that these samples could have a short shelf life, but the effect was smaller than expected. Fermentation can have a small positive effect on methane production (ie slightly reduce production), but the extraction of the florotannin did not have a decisive effect on methane production. This report is closed until 31.12.2023.

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Reports

Seaweed that improves feed for dairy cows

Published:

22/09/2021

Authors:

Ásta Heiðrún Pétursdóttir, Corentin Beaumal, Gunnar Ríkharðsson, Helga Gunnlaugsdóttir

Supported by:

Agricultural Productivity Fund, Student Innovation Fund

contact

Ásta Heiðrún E. Pétursdóttir

Head of Public Health and Food Safety

asta.h.petursdottir@matis.is

The aim was to investigate whether it would be possible to increase the usefulness of dairy cows by seaweed feeding and to examine the chemical content and quality of the milk. Also whether it would be possible to use seaweed as a mineral source, for example for organic feed that could lead to a new product such as high-fat milk and therefore encourage innovation in
cattle breeding. The results showed that seaweed administration could have a positive effect
on milk production as the groups receiving seaweed showed a slight increase in milk production compared to the control group,
but the change was not significant. The results of the collection samples showed that the trace composition changed. Seaweed supplementation could be, for example
an interesting option for farmers who are interested in or already engaged
organic production but interest in organic farming is increasing among cattle breeders.

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Reports

Results of continuous monitoring of undesirable substances in seafood from the resource 2017 / Undesirable substances in seafood - results from the Icelandic marine monitoring activities in the year 2017

Published:

17/01/2018

Authors:

Sophie Jensen, Natasa Desnica, Erna Óladóttir, Branka Borojevic, Helga Gunnlaugsdóttir

Supported by:

Atvinnuvega- og nýsköpunarráðuneytið / Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture

contact

Sophie Jensen

Project Manager

sophie.jensen@matis.is

Results of continuous monitoring of undesirable substances in seafood from the resource 2017 / Undesirable substances in seafood - results from the Icelandic marine monitoring activities in the year 2017

This report summarizes the results of monitoring of undesirable substances in edible parts of seafood in 2017. The monitoring began in 2003 with the help of the then Ministry of Fisheries, the current Ministry of Industry and Innovation, and Matís ohf. on the collection of data and the publication of reports for this systematic monitoring during the period 2003-2012. In recent years, there has been a lack of funds to continue work on this monitoring project, so this important data collection was suspended as well as the publication of results in the period 2013-2016. in edible parts of seafood from the resource intended for human consumption, but not fishmeal and fish oil for feed. For the same reason, no chemical analyzes were performed on PAH, PBDE and PFC substances this time. The aim of the project is to demonstrate the position of Icelandic seafood in terms of safety and health and to use the data in the risk assessment of food to ensure the interests of consumers and public health. The project builds a knowledge base on the amount of undesirable substances in economically important species and marine products, it is defined as a long-term project where monitoring and review is constantly necessary. In general, the results obtained in 2017 were in line with previous results from 2003 to 2012. The results showed that Icelandic seafood contains an insignificant amount of persistent organic pollutants such as dioxins, PCBs and pesticides. EU maximum levels for dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs (DL-PCBs) in food and feed were lowered on 1 January 2012 (EU Regulation No. 1259/2011) and maximum levels were set for "non-dioxin-like" PCBs (NDL-PCBs) for the first time ). The new maximum values are used in this report to assess how Icelandic seafood meets EU requirements. The results for 2017 show that despite the change in maximum levels for dioxins, DL-PCBs and NDL-PCBs, all samples of marine products for human consumption are below the EU maximum levels for persistent organic pollutants and heavy metals. The concentration of so-called ICES6-PCBs turned out to be low in the edible part of fish, compared to the new EU maximum values. The results also showed that the concentration of heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) in Icelandic seafood was always below the EU maximum values.

This report summarizes the results obtained in 2017 for the screening of various undesirable substances in the edible part of marine catches. The surveillance program began in 2003 and was carried out for ten consecutive years before it was interrupted. The project was revived in March 2017 to fill in gaps of knowledge regarding the level of undesirable substances in economically important marine catches for Icelandic export. Due to financial restrictions the surveillance now only covers screening for undesirable substances in the edible portion of marine catches for human consumption not feed or feed components. The limited financial resources also required that the analysis of PAHs, PBDEs and PFCs were excluded in the surveillance, and therefore this report provides somewhat more limited data than previously. However, it is considered to be a long-term project where extension and revision is constantly necessary. The main aim of this project is to gather data and evaluate the status of Icelandic seafood products in terms of undesirable substances and to utilize the data to estimate the exposure of consumers to these substances from Icelandic seafood and risks related to public health. Generally, the results obtained in 2017 are in agreement with previous results on undesirable substances in the edible part of marine catches obtained in the monitoring years 2003 to 2012. The results show that the edible parts of Icelandic seafood products contain negligible amounts of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as; dioxins, dioxin like PCBs and pesticides. As of January 1st 2012 Commission Regulation No 1259/2011, regarding maximum levels for dioxins, dioxin-like PCBs and non-dioxin-like PCBs in foodstuff came into force. This amendment to the existing regulation (No 1881/2006) resulted in changes in maximum levels for dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs for many food products due to changes in toxicological assessment of dioxins. Furthermore, maximum levels for non-dioxin-like PCBs have now been established in foodstuffs. In this report, we use these revised maximum levels for dioxins, dioxin-like PCBs and nondioxin-like PCBs in foodstuffs to evaluate how Icelandic seafood products measure up to limits currently in effect. The results obtained year 2017 reveal that all samples of seafood for human consumption were below EC maximum levels for POPs and heavy metals. Furthermore, the concentration of ICES6-PCBs was found to be low in the edible part of fish muscle, compared to the maximum limits set by the EU (Commission Regulation 1259/2011). The results showed that the concentrations of heavy metals, eg cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) in Icelandic seafood products was always well below the maximum limits set by EU.

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