Reports

Attitudes and buying behavior of Icelandic consumers of horsemeat

Published:

01/04/2019

Authors:

Eva Margrét Jónudóttir, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

Agricultural Productivity Fund

Contact

Eva Margrét Jónudóttir

Researcher

evamargret@matis.is

Attitudes and buying behavior of Icelandic consumers of horsemeat

The aim of this study was to submit proposals to improve the position of horsemeat in the domestic market. A quantitative research method analyzed the attitudes and purchasing behavior of Icelandic consumers (n = 853) of horsemeat. The results were, among other things, that horse and foal meat is not prominent enough and visible in stores all over the country. Most people who buy horse and / or foal meat buy it from the refrigerator or about 50% participants, but the next most common is that people get the meat from friends, relatives, slaughter it themselves, buy it directly from a farm or more. More often than not, people made little distinction between attitudes towards horsemeat on the one hand and foal meat on the other. In terms of willingness to buy products, most said they were less likely to buy minced or smoked horsemeat, but most likely to buy steaks, goldfish and schnitzel. In the opinion of the participants in the study, habits and upbringing have the greatest effect on the consumption of horse and foal meat, followed by knowledge of the product. There are many opportunities in the sale of horsemeat. Most of those who took part in the study were really positive and welcomed the discussion about horsemeat. 96% of the participants had tasted horse and / or foal meat but those who had not tasted were not interested, either because they did not eat meat over their heads or because they felt like eating their dog and considered it wrong because of emotions. Superstitions and prejudices against the consumption of horsemeat seem to have passed long ago, but the public's knowledge of the quality and treatment of horsemeat could be increased. Most people considered horsemeat and foal meat to be a clean and environmentally friendly food, free of antibiotics and contaminants. All that can be said is that there are opportunities for marketing horsemeat and it can be assumed that with many trumps in hand, a big hit can be won if the cards are held correctly.

The aim of this study was to improve the status of horse meat on the Icelandic market. A quantitative research method was used to study the attitudes and buying behavior of Icelandic consumers on horse meat (n = 853). The results showed that horse and foal meat is not prominent and visible in stores in Iceland. Most people who buy horse and / or foal meat buy it from stores, refrigerated, or about 50% of the participants, but most often people get the meat from friends, relatives, slaughter themselves or buy directly from farms. Attitudes towards horse meat and foal meat were generally similar. In terms of buying a product, most people were the least likely to buy a buried or smoked horse meat, but most likely to buy steaks, guillemots and chips. The respondents believed that habits and upbringing had the most effect on horse and foal meat consumption, but knowledge of the product was in the third place. There are many opportunities in the sale of horse meat provided for quality products. Most of the participants were positive towards horse meat and welcomed the discussion on horse meat. 96% of the participants in the survey had tasted horse and / or foal meat. Those who had not tasted the meat, had no interest, either because they did not eat meat or because they felt like eating their dog and felt it was wrong because of emotions. Pastoralism and prejudice towards horse meat appear to belong to the past, but there is room for improvement of consumer knowledge of quality and treatment of horse meat. Most people considered the horse and foal meat to be clean and environmentally friendly food, free of antibiotics and contaminants. The marketing possibilities for horse meat are good.

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