Reports

Air-dried lamb. Final report / Air dried lamb meat. Final report

Published:

01/05/2010

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

Productivity Fund, Professional Council for Sheep Breeding / BÍ Board

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Air-dried lamb. Final report / Air dried lamb meat. Final report

The aim of the project was to develop products from air-dried lamb in collaboration with farmers. The project was also about increasing farmers' skills in processing and processing lamb into air-dried products, ie. make them suitable for the manufacture of such products. A co-operation group of 5 farmers was formed who were interested and have facilities for home processing of such products. The aim was to develop one product with each farmer, and the product must meet all the requirements for safety, quality, finish and presentation that are relevant for products in the consumer market. In the main, it went well. Farmers were able to adopt the production methods necessary for dry processing and they developed new production processes and products, each different from what is on the market today. The results therefore strengthen the farm in question for the development of new products from its own raw materials and thus their working basis.

The aim of the project was to develop products from air dried lamb in cooperation with farmers. The project centered as well on extending farmers' knowledge on processing and curing methods for these products. Group of five farmers was selected to participate in the project. All farmers had an interest and facilities for this kind of processing. The products should fulfill all requirements regarding safety, quality and presentation of consumer products. This succeeded in most cases. The farmers adopted practices needed in producing dry aired products, new processing methods and products were developed. The results will thus strengthen each producer in development of new products from their own raw material, thus boosting their own operation.

View report

Reports

Air-dried lamb. Forathugun / Air dried products from lamb

Published:

01/03/2009

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

Technology Development Fund

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Air-dried lamb. Forathugun / Air dried products from lamb

The aim of the project is to prepare a collaborative project between parties in Iceland, the Faroe Islands and Norway on the development of air-dried lamb products in connection with the establishment of small start-up companies and food tourism.

The report includes a summary and analysis of the state of air drying in Iceland and a survey of market and commercial criteria. The analysis is divided into:

(1) a survey of the status of air-dried lamb in Iceland

(2) the impact of production methods on efficacy, quality and safety: a summary of technical and safety considerations; and

(3) a summary of the criteria for marking the origin and protection of certain products.

Finally, the selection of partners and the formulation of projects related to air drying of lamb are explained.

The aim of the project is to prepare a cooperative project between parties in Iceland, Faroe Islands and Norway on development of new air-dried products from lamb. The product development will be done in relation with establishment of small companies and food tourism.

The report is a summation and analysis on the situation of air drying in Iceland and exploration of market and business-related issues. The analysis is divided into:

(1) exploration on the situation of air dried lamb in Iceland

(2) influence of production methods on curing, quality and safety

(3) summation of criterion for origin-based labeling and protection of specific products.

Finally, established cooperation and creation of projects linked to air dried lamb is listed.

Report closed until 01.04.2012 / Report closed until 01.04.2012

View report

Reports

Evaluation of mutton assessment

Published:

01/02/2007

Authors:

Ásbjörn Jónsson, Óli Þór Hilmarsson

Supported by:

Productivity Fund, Executive Committee for Agricultural Contracts

contact

Óli Þór Hilmarsson

Project Manager

oli.th.hilmarsson@matis.is

Evaluation of mutton assessment

A new meat assessment for mutton according to the EUROP system was introduced in Iceland in the autumn of 1998. According to this, the carcasses are classified according to meat filling on the one hand and fat on the other. In the EUROP system, carcass filling is assessed in five main categories (E, U, R, O and P), where E is best and P is worst. Fat is also assessed in five main categories (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5), where 1 is the least and 5 the most. The fat subcategory, 3+, is also used in Iceland. In the EUROP system, the dilka carcasses are classified much more precisely by fat and body filling than was done in the old system. This precise classification serves both farmers, who get better information about their products, and meat processors who can better choose the type of meat carcass that is suitable for different processing. The aim of this project was to obtain information on the utilization, processing properties and chemical composition of dilka meat and dilka meat products, according to an assessment according to the EUROP system. During the 2003 and 2004 slaughter seasons, the assessment was carried out in three slaughterhouses. Carcasses in the following rating categories were studied: U2, U3, U3 +, U4, R1, R2, R3, R3 +, R4, O1, O2, O3, O3 +, P1 and P2. The right part of the carcass was divided into thighs, spine, beats and forequarters, to determine the ratio of meat, fat and bones. The left half was also disassembled and processed into products. Chemical measurements were performed on products to determine nutritional value. When carcasses were dissected into meat, fat, and bones, the average carcass meat content was 60%, the fat content averaged 19%, and the bone ratio averaged 18 %. Those who worked on the project were employees of Matís ohf. and Stefán Vilhjálmsson, chairman of the meat assessment, together with the employees of the slaughterhouses in question.

A new EU carcass classification system for lamb was introduced in Iceland in 1998. In the new system carcasses were evaluated according to conformation (EUROP classification: five classes, from E = '' good '', to P = '' bad '' conformation ) and fatness score (5 classes, from 1 = lean, to 5 = fat). The EU classification system is more accurate than the previous system and gives farmers more information about their carcasses and enables meat producers to select carcasses according to the different productions. The main objective of this study was to gain information about the utilization, processing quality and chemical combination of the carcasses, according to the new classification system. A study was performed in abattoirs in 2003-2004 according to the classification system. The right half of the carcasses were segmented into legs, loins, flanks and forequarters and then dissected into meat, fat and bone. The left half were segmented and processed further into final products. Chemical analysis was performed on the carcasses to estimate the nutritional value. The average proportion of the meat in the carcasses was 60%, proportion of the fat was 19% and the average bone proportion was 18%. The project was done by employees of Matís, Stefán Vilhjálmsson, chairman of the meat classification board, and the employees of the abattoirs.

View report
en_GBEnglish