Reports

Herring catch and products in Norway and Iceland 2010-2016

Published:

11/09/2018

Authors:

Páll Gunnar Pálsson, Sveinn Margeirsson

Supported by:

Product Development Center for Seafood

Herring catch and products in Norway and Iceland 2010-2016

The purpose of this report is to evaluate general and public data in the seafood value chain with a view to analyzing value creation and attempting to compare different value chains. It was therefore decided to compare the utilization of herring in Norway and Iceland. The main reason for examining the herring in these countries is that there is also a presentation of data in both countries and that processing takes place in a similar way. The information in both countries did not prove to be of such a nature that conclusive conclusions could be drawn based on the data available. It is therefore necessary to make various improvements in data collection and publication if the possibility of comparing value chains is to be available in a reliable manner.

The purpose of this summary is to evaluate how public data from seafood value chains can be used to understand the dynamics of the seafood industry and benchmark different seafood value chains against each other. To do so, we have chosen to compare how herring catch is utilized in Norway and Iceland. The reason for choosing this species is good access to public data and the likeliness of production in those two countries. We have analyzed what types of products are made from the available catch and identified the differences between the two countries regarding herring utilization. Based on the case of Norwegian and Icelandic herring value chains it is clear, that great improvements are needed in order to be able to use public data from seafood value chains to understand the dynamics of the seafood industry and benchmark different seafood value chains against each other .

View report

Reports

Sub chilling of fish

Published:

17/07/2017

Authors:

Gunnar Þórðarson, Sigurjón Arason, Magnea Karlsdóttir

Supported by:

Technology Development Fund

contact

Gunnar Þórðarson

Regional Manager

gunnar.thordarson@matis.is

Sub chilling of fish

The aim of the project was to utilize the knowledge of supercooling of fish that has been developed in laboratories in recent decades; industrialize the concept and develop methods and equipment to control the cooling. It is important to cool the raw material below the freezing point or just below the temperature at which the first ice crystals form in the fish species in question, fast enough so that large crystals do not form in the muscles and cause cell damage. It is important to control the cooling correctly as well as to maintain a supercooled condition during storage and transport, but fluctuations in temperature can cause quality deterioration. The results of research show that ice-free transport and storage of super-chilled fish is a realistic solution that reduces the cost of fishing and processing as well as reducing the cost of transport and significantly reducing the footprint of fresh fish production. Fresh salmon has been transported ice-free but super-chilled for shorter and longer distances and stored for a week before processing with excellent results. In connection with the project, supercooling has been used on a large scale in Sauðárkrókur, where the trawler Málmey SK 1 has landed over 15 thousand tonnes in the past two years of supercooled catch and thus not used ice on board or for storage for production in fish processing.

The project objective was to utilize knowledge of sub chilling of fish developed in laboratories for the past decades; and to industrialize the concept and to develop methods and means for centralizing the process. The control of the chilling process is important, to chill raw material sufficiently without freeze out more than 20% of its water and without developing large ice crystals in the muscles. It is also important to keep storage temperature under control and stable and for the same reason temperature fluctuation can cause growth of ice crystals in the muscle. Based on results obtained in present project it can be concluded that sub chilling provides opportunities to use ice-free value chain for fresh fish, lowering cost of production, logistic and considerably the carbon footprint for the final products. Fresh salmon without any external refrigerant (ice) has been transported for long distance, by trucks and airplanes, and stored for long time with acceptable results. The trawler used in this project has landed over 15 thousand tonnes of sub chilled fish for the last two years without using any ice for chilling and storage. The fish is stored in the fish plant and processed without using any ice preservation.

View report

Reports

Supply chain of Icelandic containerized fish to the UK / Supply chain of Icelandic containerized fish to the UK

Published:

01/04/2010

Authors:

Jónas R. Viðarsson, Sveinn Margeirsson

Supported by:

AVS

contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Head of Value Creation

jonas@matis.is

Supply chain of Icelandic containerized fish to the UK / Supply chain of Icelandic containerized fish to the UK

This report describes the progress and results of the project "value chain of Icelandic container fish to the UK" funded by the ACP Fund. The aim of the project is to promote improvements in the value chain of container fish with the aim of increasing the quality and value of the products. In the first part of the project, a statistical assessment is made of whether the price and quality of container fish go hand in hand, but the results from that analysis indicate that supply has a dominant effect on fish prices and that the effect of quality is completely overshadowed. One of the main preconditions for encouraging improvements in the container fish value chain is that it can be shown that increased quality has financial benefits. Therefore, attempts were made to increase the provision of information on the forthcoming supply, in addition to which the information that accompanied catches was added to the floor of the auction markets. This was done in the hope that it would boost buyers' awareness of quality and that it would have a positive effect on fish prices. However, this experiment did not yield the desired results. It is the project partner's opinion that the key to increasing the quality and value of container fish is to arouse more interest among sellers as well as buyers in quality. In this way, buyers will be more willing to pay a higher price for the best quality, thus creating a market-related incentive among sellers to deliver only the best possible quality. With this aim in mind, the project partners were responsible for the introduction of quality assessment in the classification of fish in the UK markets and it is hoped that this will be useful to buyers in identifying which exporters perform best. The website www.matis.is/gamafiskur was also launched, with the aim of disseminating information to everyone in the container fish value chain on the issues that are likely to affect quality and value.

This is a report on the progress and results from the project "supply chain of Icelandic containerized fish to the UK". The objective of the project is to contribute to improvements in the supply chain of containerized fish from Iceland with the aim to improve quality and value. Financial benefits are a necessary condition in order to motivate improvements in the supply chain of containerized fish. Experiments were therefore made where information on expected supply and labeling of bins at auction markets were improved. This however did not return the expected results ie it did not affect average prices. The key to increasing quality and value of Icelandic containerized fish is to raise awareness for quality amongst suppliers and processors. Processors need to identify the suppliers that are supplying the best fish and they also need to reward them with higher prices. This would create a market-based incentive for suppliers to supply only top-quality fish. In order to contribute to this an intake quality score system has been implemented at Fishgate and Grimsby Fish Market, collecting data on the performance of individual suppliers. Also, a web-based supply chain guide www.matis.is/supplychainguide has been published, where relevant information for each link in the supply chain will be gathered.

View report

Reports

Reform of the food value chain. Summary / Improvements in the food value chain. Roundup

Published:

01/03/2010

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Hlynur Stefánsson, Emil B. Karlsson, Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Einar Karl Þórhallsson, Jón Haukur Arnarson, Sveinn Margeirsson, Ragnheiður Héðinsdóttir

Supported by:

Technology Development Fund

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Reform of the food value chain. Summary / Improvements in the food value chain. Roundup

It is known that a lot of waste takes place in the food value chain. There are many causes, such as incorrect product management, incorrect handling, broken cooling chain or insufficient cooling at some stage, broken packaging and countless many more. Food producers and retailers believe that such waste can be significantly reduced through the concerted efforts of all those involved in the value chain. In this way, food prices could be reduced significantly. The aim of the project was to identify where in the food value chain shrinkage takes place and to define measures to minimize the waste resulting from the shrinkage. Emphasis was placed on the value chain of one category of food: chilled meat products. Excessive or incorrect production and excess inventory of sensitive products were identified as one of the main causes of waste. Incorrect product handling and logistics are also important. A prototype of an information system was developed to improve production management and reduce inventory costs in the value chain. The results of the project indicate that high-quality and disciplined work methods in the entire value chain and a good flow of information between suppliers and retailers offer enormous potential for optimization, not least in the field of product management.

Great amount of waste is created in the food value chain. The reason is manifold; inadequate logistics, wrong treatment, inadequate temperature management, damaged packaging etc. Food producers and retail belief this waste can be reduced substantially by joint forces of stakeholders in the food supply chain, resulting in lower food prices. The aim of the project was to analyze where in the value chain waste is created and define actions to reduce it. Fresh / chilled meat products were chosen for the case study. The main sources of waste were identified as excessive production and inventory levels of persiable products, improper handling of products and raw material and problems with logistics. Prototype of decision support system was made to improve inventory and production management in the supply chain. The results indicate that elaborate and disciplined practices throughout the value chain and improved information sharing between suppliers and retailers can create opportunities for rationalization, especially in the field of logistics.

View report

Reports

Reform of the food value chain. Product mapping and product management / Improvements in the food value chain. Mapping of product process and logistics

Published:

01/03/2010

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Jón Haukur Arnarson, Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Hlynur Stefánsson

Supported by:

Technology Development Fund

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Reform of the food value chain. Product mapping and product management / Improvements in the food value chain. Mapping of product process and logistics

This report addresses the first part of the Food Chain Reform project, the main objective of which is to identify where food degradation occurs in the food chain and to define measures to minimize the waste resulting from shrinkage. In this first part, emphasis was placed on analysis / mapping of the product process and product management, and it was divided into three work components that were carried out in parallel. All participating companies were visited. The work processes of the companies were reviewed, their facilities inspected and an opinion obtained on what could be done better in the process of chilled meat products from their point of view. It was examined what kind of information the companies have about the products, in what form they are and how they are used. It was also examined what information is received between links in the value chain, how it is received and what information / data from other links can help the party in question to better manage unnecessary shrinkage. Following this work, an analysis was made of the factors that were considered most important and proposals were formulated for improvements regarding procedures, information, measurements, etc.

This report discusses the first part of the project Improvements in the food value chain. The main aim of the project was to analyze where in the value chain waste is created and define actions to reduce it. In this first part emphasis was put on product processes and logistics.

View report

Reports

Reform of the food value chain. Effects of the cold chain on the shrinkage of meat / Improvements in the food value chain. Influence of the chill chain on impairment of meat product

Published:

01/03/2010

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Jón Haukur Arnarson, Óli Þór Hilmarsson

Supported by:

Technology Development Fund

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Reform of the food value chain. Effects of the cold chain on the shrinkage of meat / Improvements in the food value chain. Influence of the chill chain on impairment of meat product

This report covers one part of the Food Value Improvement Project, the main objective of which is to identify where in the food value chain shrinkage is taking place and to define measures to minimize the waste resulting from the shrinkage. In this section, emphasis was placed on examining the effect of temperature on shrinkage in relation to the main steps in the process of chilled meat products from producers until they reach consumers.

This report discusses a part of the project Improvements in the food value chain. The main aim of the project was to analyze where in the value chain waste is created and define actions to reduce it. In this part emphasis was put on the influence of temperature on impairment of chilled meat products in respect to the different steps in the supply chain.

View report

Reports

Reform of the food value chain. Proposal for project descriptions for the meat value chain / Improvements in the food value chain. Propositions for managing the meat chill chain

Published:

01/03/2010

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Jón Haukur Arnarson, Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Hlynur Stefánsson

Supported by:

Technology Development Fund

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Reform of the food value chain. Proposal for project descriptions for the meat value chain / Improvements in the food value chain. Propositions for managing the meat chill chain

This report covers one part of the Food Value Improvement Chain project, the main objective of which is to identify where in the food value value chain waste is occurring and to define measures to minimize the waste resulting from the waste. This section sets out proposals for improved procedures to improve the production and transport processes of chilled meat products, with the main emphasis on temperature control in the process. The project descriptions are based on requirements set by regulations, official guidelines and research results. The rules of procedure are divided into three parts; production, transport and retail. No project descriptions are made for specific processing methods.

This report discusses a part of the project Improvements in the food value chain. The main aim of the project was to analyze where in the value chain waste is created and define actions to reduce it. In this part propositions are made for good practices in relation to the meat chill chain. The propositions are based on regulation requirements; good manufacturing guidelines and research conclusions. They are divided into three main parts; processing, transport and retail. Specific processing methods are not included.

View report
EN