Reports

Analysis of damage to fresh fish products / Comparison of transport and packaging methods for fresh fish products - storage life study

Published:

13/07/2016

Authors:

Magnea G. Karlsdóttir, Gunnar Þórðarson, Ásgeir Jónsson, Hrund Ólafsdóttir, Sigurjón Arason, Björn Margeirsson, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund (R 034‐14)

contact

Gunnar Þórðarson

Regional Manager

gunnar.thordarson@matis.is

Analysis of damage processes in fresh fish transport / Comparison of transport and packaging methods for fresh fish products - storage life study

The aim of the project "Best fresh fish transport" was to improve the handling of fresh fish products in container transport and thereby increase their shelf life and the possibility of further transport by sea from Iceland, but there are significant savings compared to transport by air. This report deals with the analysis of the damage processes that take place during the storage and transport of fresh fish products. A comparison was made of transport in foam plastic boxes and in ice scrapers in pots at different temperatures. Different embodiments of both packaging solutions were compared and assessment factors included temperature, total number of microorganisms, amount of damaged microorganisms, water resistance, amount of erratic base and sensory assessment properties. In general, there was relatively little difference between experimental groups during storage. Differences were found between groups in individual sensory evaluation factors, but this difference was not comparable between days and is therefore probably due to the interaction between heterogeneous raw material and too few evaluated samples. The freshness time of all groups was seven to eight days and the shelf life was about 10 days. The packaging solutions studied in the experiment, as well as the storage temperature, had little effect on the spoilage processes of the cod products. The variability was primarily due to the storage time.

The aim of the project “Optimization of fresh fish transport” was to improve the handling of fresh fish products during sea freight and increase the shelf life and the possibility of further maritime transport from Iceland, involving significant savings relative to the air freight. The present report covers analysis of the deterioration processes occurring during storage and transportation of fresh whitefish products. Comparison was done between transportation in expanded polystyrene boxes and in slurry ice in tubs at different ambient temperature. Different versions of both packaging solutions were compared with regard to temperature, total viable count, amount of spoilage bacteria, water holding capacity, total volatile nitrogen bases (TVB ‐ N) and sensory properties. There were in general relatively small differences between experimental groups during the storage period. Some difference was observed between groups with regard to few sensory attributes, but the difference was not comparable between days which was likely due to heterogeneous material and too small sampling size. The freshness period of all experimental groups was seven to eight days and the shelf life around 10 days. The packaging solutions explored in the present study, as well as storage temperature, had generally little effect on the deterioration processes occurring in the fresh cod product. The observed variation was primarily attributed to the storage time.

Report closed until 01.08.2018

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Reports

Economic analysis of fresh fish transportation

Published:

13/07/2016

Authors:

Ásgeir Jónsson, Björn Margeirsson, Sigurjón Arason, Ögmundur Knútsson, Magnea G. Karlsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund (R 034‐14)

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Economic analysis of fresh fish transportation

The aim of the project Optimization of fresh fish transport is to improve the handling of fresh fish products in container transport and thereby increase their shelf life and the possibility of further transport by sea from Iceland. In work component 4, the development of fresh fish transport from Iceland is analyzed according to the mode of transport and the main market areas for fresh fillets and pieces. An economic analysis of the use of pots and foam boxes is carried out with regard to packaging and transport costs. Exports of fresh whitefish fillets and pieces have increased rapidly over the past decade. Year after year, the amount of fresh fillets and chunks imported from Iceland by sea increases. A product that was almost exclusively transported by air a decade ago is now almost equally transported by ship. The results show that the amount of fresh fillets and pieces transported by ship from Iceland almost increased sixfold from 2004 to 2014. In 2013 and 2014, about 90% of the fresh fillets and pieces transported by ship were transported to two markets; Britain and France. The results of a cost analysis show that it is considerably cheaper to pack a product in a pot than a foam box. Transport costs are also lower in most cases when comparing pots with foam boxes. It is more than half as low when comparing the cost of transporting a container of pots on the one hand and 3 kg of foam boxes on the other. However, there are some limiting factors in the use of pots. All things being equal, pots are not likely to replace a foam box except in part due to practical aspects of product distribution. In some cases, however, transport in pots could be very suitable.

The aim of the project Optimization of fresh fish transport is to improve handling of sea transported fresh fish products, thereby improving their quality and increasing the possibility of sea transport from Iceland. The aim of work package no. 4 is to analyze main markets and the development of fresh fish transport from Iceland. Also compare cost of traditional packaging in expanded polystyrene (EPS) boxes to pack the product in tubs containing slurry ice. Export of fresh white fish fillets and loins from Iceland has increased rapidly over the last decade. More and more fillets and loins are transported with ships. What used to be an exclusive air freight business is now almost equal (air vs. sea). The results show that the volume of fillets and loins transported with ships from Iceland nearly six folded from 2004 to 2014. In 2013 and 2014 almost 90% of the export went to two markets; Britain and France. Results show that cost of packing product in tubs is significantly lower than using EPS boxes. Transportation cost was also lower in most cases when using tubs than EPS, as much as half of the cost when compared to the smallest EPS box (3 kg) in a full container. Some factors limit the practicality of using tubs rather than EPS. It is unlikely that tubs will replace boxes unless introducing matching distribution options. In some cases using tubs can be both practical and very cost efficient.

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Reports

Comparison of packing of fresh fish products in boxes and pots for export by ship / Packing of fresh fish products in boxes and tubs intended for sea transport

Published:

01/07/2016

Authors:

Magnea G. Karlsdóttir, Ásgeir Jónsson, Gunnar Þórðarson, Björn Margeirsson, Sigurjón Arason, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Þorsteinn Ingi Víglundsson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund (R 034‐14)

contact

Gunnar Þórðarson

Regional Manager

gunnar.thordarson@matis.is

Comparison of packing of fresh fish products in boxes and pots for export by ship / Packing of fresh fish products in boxes and tubs intended for sea transport

The aim of the study was to find the best and most cost-effective method of packing fresh fish products for shipping with a view to maximizing the shelf life of a product, which is one of the key factors in the marketing of fresh fish products. Experiments were carried out with the transport of fresh fish products in containers with ice scrapers and compared with the transport in foam plastic boxes with regard to temperature control, product quality and transport costs. Different product groups were compared that were packed in different packaging and stored at different storage temperatures. The purpose of these experiments was to simulate the environmental conditions during the transport of fresh fish products, with a view to evaluating the effect of pre-cooling before packaging and packaging methods on the shelf life of the products. The results clearly indicate that refrigeration of products before packaging as well as low and stable storage temperatures are among the most important factors that increase the shelf life of fresh fish products. Different packaging solutions also affected the shelf life of fresh fish products, although the effect was not as decisive as the effect of temperature. The results indicate an increased likelihood of longer shelf life if fresh fish products are packed in tanks with sub-chilled sludge compared to traditional packaging in a foam plastic box with ice. To estimate the amount of ice scraper required to maintain an acceptable temperature, a heat transfer model was developed. An economic analysis of different packaging and transport was carried out in the project and this work shows significant savings with the use of tanks for transporting fresh fish products in comparison with foam plastic boxes. Pots can replace a foam plastic box to a considerable extent and be a cost-effective option for some companies. The economic analysis showed that larger parties could take advantage of this method, as they can fill entire containers for export. But the method is no less useful for smaller processes, which do not have the capacity to make large investments in equipment to ensure adequate cooling for the packaging of products for export of fresh raw materials. The results are a good contribution to discussions about fresh fish products in foreign markets.

The goal of the study was to find the best and most efficient method of packaging fresh fish for sea transport with the aim of maximizing the storage life of the product, which is a key element in the marketing of fresh fish. Experiments were made with the transport of fresh fish in tubs with slurry ice and compared with transport in expanded polystyrene boxes with regard to temperature control, product quality and shipping cost. Different product groups were compared, using different temperature conditions and packing methods to find the best outcome for fresh fish quality and storage life. Experimental results clearly indicate that the pre ‐ cooling for packaging and low and stable storage temperature play a major factor to maximize storage life of fresh fish products. Different packaging solutions are also a factor, though the effect was not as dramatic as the effects of temperature. The results indicate an increased likelihood of extended shelf life if fresh fish is packed in a tub with a slurry ice compared to traditional packaging in expanded polystyrene boxes with ice. In order to estimate the necessary amount of slurry ice to maintain acceptable temperature, a thermal model was developed. Economic analysis of different packaging and transport was also carried out and the results showed substantial savings with the use of tubs for the transport of fresh fish products in comparison with the styrofoam boxes.

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Reports

Effect of salt content in slurry ice on quality of fresh and thawed Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus)

Published:

01/12/2015

Authors:

Paulina E. Romotowska, Björn Margeirsson, Gísli Kristjánsson, Sigurjón Arason, Magnea G. Karlsdóttir, Sæmundur Elíasson, Arnljótur B. Bergsson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund (R 12 029-12)

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Effect of salt content in slurry ice on quality of fresh and thawed Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus)

The aim of the experiment was to improve methods of cooling and storage of fresh produce in order to improve the quality of frozen mackerel products. A comparison was made of cooling in conventional ice scrapers and salt-improved ice scrapers. By adding salt to the ice scraper, it was hoped that the temperature of fresh mackerel could be lowered and thus its quality maintained longer. The fresh mackerel was stored for up to seven days after fishing. Another aim of the study was to investigate whether this different cooling of fresh mackerel affects the deterioration of the quality of frozen mackerel products. The results showed that the temperature distribution in the pots was related to salt concentration as lower temperatures were obtained in pots with higher salt content (3.3%). On the other hand, the cold storage had a much greater effect on the quality factors such as the freshness and release of the mackerel products compared to the effect of pre-cooling, as the effect of different salt concentrations in the ice scraper was negligible in terms of these quality factors.

The present experiment is part of the research project - Increased value of mackerel through systematic chilling. The aim of this study was to improve methods of chilling and storing of fresh products in order to obtain better quality of frozen mackerel products. This project was carried out to develop slurry ice mixture with addition of extra salt, with the intention of temperature decrease during chill storage up to seven days after catch. Secondary objective of this research was to investigate if different chilling condition of fresh fish has an effect on the quality assignment of long-term frozen mackerel products. The results showed that temperature distribution in the tubs was correlated to the salt concentration where lower temperature was obtained in the tub with higher salt content (3.3%). Furthermore, freshness, gaping and peritoneum deterioration have been affected by the storage process but not by different salt concentration in slurry ice during chilled storage. Due to high quality variation within the same group of the mackerel is needed to conduct more methods for quality evaluation such as oxidation analysis and sensory analysis.

Report closed until 01.01.2018

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Reports

Effects of bleeding methods on the quality and storage life of cod and saithe products

Published:

01/02/2014

Authors:

Magnea G. Karlsdóttir, Nguyen Van Minh, Sigurjón Arason, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Paulina E. Romotowska, Arnjótur B. Bergsson, Stefán Björnsson

Supported by:

AVS (R 11 087‐11)

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Effects of bleeding methods on the quality and storage life of cod and saithe products

The aim of the project was to examine the effect of different bleeding methods on the quality and shelf life of different cod and saithe products. By identifying ideal conditions for bleeding, gutting and bleeding, it is possible to prevent product defects due to blood and at the same time increase the stability of the products in transport and storage. The fish were either bloodied in the hands and in the machine. Bleeding took place in slush or sea and the effects of different bleeding times were examined. The effect of waiting time on tires before bleeding was also assessed, as well as bleeding and gutting the fish in one step or two steps (gutting performed after bleeding). The products studied in this project were chilled and frozen cod and saithe products, as well as salted cod products. Of the variables studied in this project, their importance differed in terms of which fish species were involved and what the final product was. When comparing comparable sample groups of cod and saithe, it is seen that different conditions are suitable for each species. This supports the theory that it is probably not possible to transfer the best bleeding method of cod to saithe and vice versa. Bleeding time and type of bleeding agent (sludge vs. seawater) had a decisive effect on the stability of the cod and saithe products examined. Cod products, both chilled and frozen, from raw material soaked in sludge generally resulted in improved quality and stability compared to if soaked in seawater. In contrast to cod, the bleeding of saithe into the sea generally resulted in a stable end product. The way the fish were bled and gutted also had a decisive effect on the final products. In the case of frozen cod products, raw and gutted raw material in one step generally yielded a more stable product compared to raw material that was gutted after bleeding had occurred (two steps). Salted products, on the other hand, were much more stable in storage if the raw material was gutted after bleeding. Different results were also obtained for saithe depending on the final product involved. Bleeding and gutting of saithe in a machine had a positive effect on the shelf life of chilled products compared to if made by hand. Machine bleeding and gutting, on the other hand, resulted in a much more unstable product in the cold. The results of the project show that the effects of different bleeding methods are quite dependent on the raw material as well as the final product involved.

The main objective of the project was to study the effects of different bleeding methods on quality and storage life of various cod and saithe products. Products defects due to blood residues can be prevented by optimizing bleeding protocols, and hence increase the quality and storage life of the products. For this, fishes were either bled and gutted by hand or by machine. The bleeding (blood draining) was carried out with seawater or slurry ice, and the effects of different bleeding times in the tanks were also investigated. Moreover, the effects of waiting time (on deck) before bleeding, as well as the procedure of bleeding technique (bleeding and gutting in one procedure vs. gutting after blood draining) were investigated. The various products evaluated were chilled and frozen cod and saithe products, and salted cod products. The importance of the different parameters investigated in this project varied considerably with regard to fish species and the final products. Comparison of parallel treatments groups of cod and saithe demonstrated that optimum bleeding procedures are different for each species. Waiting time on deck and bleeding media (slurry ice vs. seawater) significantly affected the storage life of the cod and saithe products. Cod products, both chilled and frozen, from fish bled in slurry ice generally resulted in improved quality and storage life compared to fish bled in seawater. In contrast to cod, bleeding or saithe in seawater resulted however in more stable products. The procedure during bleeding and gutting also had great impact on the storage life of the various products studied. Shorter storage life of salted cod products was generally observed when the raw material was bled and gutted in one step compared to when gutting was performed after bleeding (two steps). Rather conflicting results were, however, observed for saithe and were depending on the type of final product. Bleeding and gutting of saithe by machine improved the storage life of chilled products compared to when the saithe was bled and gutted by hand. The machine procedure had, however, negative effects on the storage life of the frozen saithe products. Overall, the results of this project indicate that the effects of different bleeding methods are highly relative to fish species as well as the final product of interest.

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Reports

Effect of post ‐ slaughter time intervals on yield and quality of farmed cod

Published:

01/11/2011

Authors:

Kristín Anna Þórarinsdóttir, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir, Ásbjörn Jónsson, Hannes Magnússon, Kristján G. Jóakimsson, Sveinn K. Guðjónsson

Supported by:

AVS (R 11 006‐010)

contact

Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir

Sensory evaluation manager

adalheiduro@matis.is

Effect of post ‐ slaughter time intervals on yield and quality of farmed cod

The purpose of the experiment was to investigate whether the waiting time (0, 2, 4 hours) from slaughter to processing had an effect on weight uptake during injection and the properties of frozen fillets. In addition, changes in thawed fillets during refrigerated storage were assessed. Changes in weight, chemical content, water resistance, microbial growth and levels of degradable substances were monitored, as well as the fillets were sensitized. For comparison, untreated fillets were used. Weight gain was greater as the waiting time became longer. Salting increased the water resistance of the fillets and reduced shrinkage during thawing and boiling compared to untreated fillets. The injected fillets were therefore also juicier. Higher water resistance of injected fillets is explained by the fact that a higher proportion of water was inside the muscle cells in the injected fillets, while the extracellular fluid was higher in untreated fillets and proportionally more water was loosely bound. The number of micro-organisms was higher in injected fillets, as expected, as the injection spreads micro-organisms throughout the muscle instead of being found only on the surface of the muscle after filleting. Damage symptoms therefore became more pronounced in injected fillets as the storage of thawed fillets progressed over a 2-week period, despite the fact that the fillets were not initially considered more relaxed. Desalination of salted fillets was higher according to TBA values, but its effect was not noticeable on sensory evaluation. Higher salt content was thought to increase the death stiffness of the injected fillets and give a rubberier and stiffer texture compared to untreated fillets. The appearance of injected fillets was poorer, they were a bit darker and more uneven than untreated fillets.

The aim of the experiment was to evaluate the effect of post ‐ slaughter time intervals on injection yield and characteristics of frozen cod fillets. In addition, to evaluate changes in thawed fillets during chilled storage. Weight gain by injection was higher as the waiting time was longer. Salting increased water retention during storage and cooking in comparison to untreated fillets. Therefore, the injected fillets were also juicier. The higher water retention of injected fillets was explained by a higher percentage of water within the muscle cells while the ration of intercellular fluid was higher in untreated fillets. Spoilage became more pronounced in injected fillets over 2 weeks of chilled storage of the fillets after thawing. Oxidation was higher in salted complex as expressed by higher TBARS ‐ values, but the effect was not observed in sensory analysis. Higher salt content seemed to increase rigor contraction in injected fillets and result in a more rubbery texture of the injected fillets, which were also slightly darker and more heterogeneous than untreated fillets.

Report closed until 01.01.2015

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Reports

Full processing of mackerel

Published:

01/10/2011

Authors:

Ásbjörn Jónsson, Ragnheiður Sveinþórsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

Full processing of mackerel

The main objective of the project was to develop valuable products for human consumption from mackerel caught by pelagic vessels as well as to assess the profitability of such processing. Mackerel products for human consumption are much more valuable than products from fishmeal processing and there are great interests in processing for human consumption, such as canning and hot smoking. Experiments were carried out with the processing of mackerel in canning. Mackerel was boiled in tomato puree and smoked and boiled in oil. There was also an experiment with hot smoking of mackerel. The efficiency of such processing was done together with a sensitivity analysis, based on a yield of 13%. Positive results of experiments with mackerel processing in canning and hot smoking, together with a profitability assessment of such processing, indicated that such processing was profitable in the long run.

The main objective of this project was to develop valuable products from mackerel for human consumption together with evaluation of profitability of such processing. Mackerel products for human consumption are more valuable than products from oil and meal processing. Trials were done on processing mackerel products from canning in oil and tomato puree, and hotsmoking. Profitability of such process was evaluated with IRR (internal rate of return) of 13%. Favorable results of the project indicated that processing of canned and smoked products could be profitable in the long ‐ term.

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Reports

Quality of coastal fishing catches 2011

Published:

15/09/2011

Authors:

Jónas R. Viðarsson, Sigurjón Arason, Sveinn Margeirsson, Guðjón Gunnarsson, Garðar Sverrisson, Örn Sævar Holm, Þórhallur Ottesen

Supported by:

Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture

contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Head of Value Creation

jonas@matis.is

Quality of coastal fishing catches 2011

At the end of the summer, the Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture requested from Matís, Matvælastofnun and the Directorate of Fisheries that an assessment be made of the quality of coastal fishing catches. Matvælastofnun had already, in collaboration with the Directorate of Fisheries, launched an effort that dealt with catch treatment in general for all day-trip boats and that work was used in the project. A steering group was formed for the project and it decided that the focus would mainly be on a few principles that affect product quality, ie. icing and cooling, worms in the flesh, size and classification, bleeding and gutting, sorting and finishing in pots, color of redness and procedures in fish markets. Measurements and other data collection took place in June, July and August. Data were collected as follows:

• The Directorate of Fisheries and MAST measured the temperature of the catch when landing around the country.

• The fish markets increased the temperature measurements in their catch and provided the results with the project.

• MAST employees investigated various issues related to the handling of catch among small boat fishermen.

• Matís' employee interviewed the parties that handle the catch of coastal fishing boats the most.

• Matís employees visited the fish market to check procedures.

The results of the survey show that inshore fish vary in quality. Coastal fishing boats fish during the hottest season when fish are in poor condition for natural reasons, they tend to stay close to land where the fish are small, there are more worms and the color of the red is darker (kelp); they usually land uncut catches and the size distribution is large. Access to ice is limited in some ports, gutting services are generally no longer available and the transport of ungutted catch between parts of the country at this time of year can be detrimental to the raw material if the catch treatment has not been satisfactory. Ensuring the quality of the catch is therefore a problem for the coastal fishing fleet. The most influential factor in the quality of inshore fishing is cooling. In general, it can be said that the coastal fishing fleet performs well in comparison with the traditional day-trip boats in terms of cooling, and it is not possible to distinguish a significant difference between these fishing groups. The results of the audit also indicate that the cooling of coastal catches has improved from the previous year. It should be noted, however, that cooling needs to be further improved to meet the requirements set out in regulations. Classification and gutting are also factors that affect the quality of coastal fishing catches. It is important that fish markets and their customers find acceptable ways to ensure that buyers are given the size of fish they consider to be buying, but the authorities will need to consider changes to regulations on gutting to ensure the maximum quality of inshore catches. With regard to other factors influencing quality, it is most natural for market laws to prevail, ie. that price and quality go hand in hand, but in order for that to happen, it is necessary to increase the visibility of quality factors in the fish markets and increase promotion. Efforts were made to educate, measure and monitor day-trippers in the summer of 2011 and it is important that the government ensures that this path is continued next year.

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Reports

Increased value of pelagic species - FINAL REPORT / Increased value of pelagic species

Published:

01/05/2011

Authors:

Lárus Þorvaldsson, Björn Margeirsson, Ásbjörn Jónsson, Sindri Sigurðsson (SVN), Ásgeir Gunnarsson (SÞ), Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Increased value of pelagic species - FINAL REPORT / Increased value of pelagic species

The main objective of the project Increasing the value of pelagic fish - improved refrigeration technology, which began in June 2008, was to lay the foundations for a new method of cooling and storing pelagic fish on board seiners. The result of improved cooling is that a higher proportion of the catch is useful for human consumption. Partners in the project were Matís, Síldarvinnslan (SVN) and Skinney Þinganes (UN). This report describes the main results and products of the project. Examples of products are heat transfer models of pelagic catches in ships and storage tanks on land and the integration of heat transfer models and quality forecast models, which make it possible to predict the quality of raw materials based on environmental temperature history. Heat distribution in pelagic vessel loads with different versions of cooling systems was mapped and storage temperatures were linked to quality measurements made during landing. From temperature and quality measurements it is clear that the frequency of defects in landed catch increases with increasing storage temperature. The main advantage of the MCS (Mixed Cooling System) cooling system, which combines CSW (Chilled Sea Water) and RSW (Refrigerated Sea Water) cooling systems, is that the system can reduce the inevitable temperature rise that occurs in a pre-cooled vessel following the pumping of catch in lestina. During the project, the Icelandic mackerel fishery was the largest and it can be stated that the results of the project have been used very well to improve the results of food processing of mackerel in this country and thus increase the product prices of a valuable species.  

The main aim of the research project Increased value of pelagic species - improved chilling methods, which was initiated in June 2008, was to develop a new method for chilling and storing pelagic species on board purse seiners resulting in more valuable products. This report describes the main results and products of the project. Examples include heat transfer models of pelagic fish stored in a ship hold and a storage tank onshore and coupling of the heat transfer models and quality forecasting models, which makes it possible to predict spoilage of pelagic species as a function of ambient temperature history. Temperature distributions in ship holds with different cooling systems were mapped and storage temperature related to quality measurements conducted during landing. The fault ratio of landed raw material clearly increased, indicating lower quality, with higher storage temperature. The main advantage of a mixed cooling system (MCS), which combines RSW and CSW systems, compared to using only RSW is a lower temperature increase in a precooled ship hold caused by loading the catch in the hold. During the project, the emphasis on mackerel fishing increased significantly around Iceland. It can be stated that the results of this project have been widely exploited in order to improve the yield of the mackerel and thereby increase the profitability of that valuable species.

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Reports

Small vessels - Optimizing catch value

Published:

01/12/2010

Authors:

Jónas R. Viðarsson, Sveinn Margeirsson, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

AVS (project R 011‐09)

contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Head of Value Creation

jonas@matis.is

Small vessels - Optimizing catch value

The catch of small boats has the potential to be the best raw material available, as it is hardly possible to think of a fresher fish than the catch of day-trippers fishing on line or hand gear. Improper handling can, however, have the effect that small-boat fish do not live up to the expectations placed on them, which in turn means that it is not possible to process the catch into the most valuable products. Often, however, relatively small changes in working methods are required to ensure that the catch is under the brand name as a fish of maximum quality. This report discusses the issues that most affect the quality and shelf life of small boat fish, measures and comparisons are made of various influencing factors, reports on the preparation of guidance and incentive material published in connection with the project, and finally proposals are made for improvements in the value chain of small boat fish. The main emphasis in the project was on the preparation and distribution of teaching and instructional material for seafarers. A booklet and leaflets were published and distributed to all small boat fishermen in the country, and it is expected that the result will be reflected in increased knowledge of the importance of good handling of fish. Interested parties can contact Matís and receive the brochure by post, but it is also available on the company's website, ie. www.matis.is/media/matis/utgafa/Mikilvaegi‐godrar‐medhondlunar‐a‐fiski.pdf

The catch of small day ‐ boats using handline or longline has the potentials of being the best available raw material for the production of high value seafood. Improper handling has however often resulted in poor quality of this catch, which makes the products unsuitable for high ‐ end markets. Generally speaking there is however only need for relatively small adjustments in handling procedures in order to allow fish from small day ‐ boats to live up to its potentials as top quality seafood. In this report are discussed various quality issues related to small day ‐ boats. Measurements and comparisons are made between quality factors. Work related to writing, publishing and distribution of an educational brochure and other quality inducing material is accounted for. And finally there are brought forth suggestions on how to improve the value chain of catch from small day‐ boats. The main focus of this project was awarded to publishing practical and easy to understand educational material for fishermen. A brochure and a one ‐ pager were published and distributed to every small vessel in the Icelandic fleet. Hopefully, this educational material will be widely used amongst fishermen and contribute to improved knowledge on the importance of proper handling of seafood. The brochure is available at Matís and online at www.matis.is/media/matis/utgafa/Mikilvaegi‐godrar‐medhondlunar‐a‐fiski.pdf

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