Reports

Comparison of transportation bins for whole fresh fish / Comparison of transportation bins for whole fresh fish

Published:

01/10/2018

Authors:

Jónas R. Viðarsson, Marvin I. Einarsson

Supported by:

AVS S10015-10 (small project / preliminary project)

contact

Jónas Rúnar Viðarsson

Head of Value Creation

jonas@matis.is

Comparison of transportation bins for whole fresh fish / Comparison of transportation bins for whole fresh fish

The aim of this report was to consider the main advantages and disadvantages of different transport packaging for whole fresh fish (container fish), and whether the choice of packaging affects the quality and value of the catch. The report discusses the export of containerized fish, the value chain of containerized fish, the containers that have been used for the storage and transport of containerized fish, and the factors that must be taken into account when processing, storing and transporting whole fresh fish. In addition, the relationship between price and quality of catch sold on auction markets is briefly discussed. An experiment was carried out with the export of containerized fish in four different types of containers, where it was to be investigated whether there was a difference between the quality, weight loss and the value of the catch. However, this experiment did not provide sufficient reliable information to establish whether the type of transport container affected the aforementioned factors. However, the development that has taken place in the production and sale of tanks shows that more and more companies are choosing smaller tanks, and this should therefore be a good indication that the size of the tanks is important. However, the experiment clearly showed that it would be very difficult to re-box the Icelandic fleet. Icelandic sailors have become accustomed to pots and have little interest in returning; in addition, the installation in trains is today designed for pots. In addition, it is common for Icelandic vessels to catch fish that simply do not fit in the boxes, due to their size. However, it is not ruled out that in some cases, boxes could be a good option for exporting whole fresh fish, such as sun charcoal or "anglerfish tails".

The aim of this report is to identify the main pros and cons of different storage containers for whole fresh fish, and to speculate if the choice of storage containers has an effect on the quality and sales price of the catch. The report includes a discussion on the exports of unprocessed fish to the UK, the value chain of those exports, the storage boxes used and the things that need to be considered during handling, storage and transport of those catches. The report does as well discuss briefly the linkage between quality and price at auction markets. The report also covers an experiment that was made where four types of tubs and boxes were used to transport fish to the UK, in order to study applicability and effects on quality, drip loss and prices. The experiment did not, however, give clear enough results to allow for any conclusions to be made on the issues. The study did however suggest that the applicability of using boxes onboard Icelandic fishing vessels is lacking. Fishermen prefer to use tubs and the onboard setup is made for tubs. The sales agents in the UK did also agree on this, as they are not able to guarantee that using boxes will have any effect on prices. They did however suggest that some high-price species or products would likely attain price premium if transported in small boxes eg lemon sole and monkfish tails.

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Reports

Economic analysis of fresh fish transportation

Published:

13/07/2016

Authors:

Ásgeir Jónsson, Björn Margeirsson, Sigurjón Arason, Ögmundur Knútsson, Magnea G. Karlsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund (R 034‐14)

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Economic analysis of fresh fish transportation

The aim of the project Optimization of fresh fish transport is to improve the handling of fresh fish products in container transport and thereby increase their shelf life and the possibility of further transport by sea from Iceland. In work component 4, the development of fresh fish transport from Iceland is analyzed according to the mode of transport and the main market areas for fresh fillets and pieces. An economic analysis of the use of pots and foam boxes is carried out with regard to packaging and transport costs. Exports of fresh whitefish fillets and pieces have increased rapidly over the past decade. Year after year, the amount of fresh fillets and chunks imported from Iceland by sea increases. A product that was almost exclusively transported by air a decade ago is now almost equally transported by ship. The results show that the amount of fresh fillets and pieces transported by ship from Iceland almost increased sixfold from 2004 to 2014. In 2013 and 2014, about 90% of the fresh fillets and pieces transported by ship were transported to two markets; Britain and France. The results of a cost analysis show that it is considerably cheaper to pack a product in a pot than a foam box. Transport costs are also lower in most cases when comparing pots with foam boxes. It is more than half as low when comparing the cost of transporting a container of pots on the one hand and 3 kg of foam boxes on the other. However, there are some limiting factors in the use of pots. All things being equal, pots are not likely to replace a foam box except in part due to practical aspects of product distribution. In some cases, however, transport in pots could be very suitable.

The aim of the project Optimization of fresh fish transport is to improve handling of sea transported fresh fish products, thereby improving their quality and increasing the possibility of sea transport from Iceland. The aim of work package no. 4 is to analyze main markets and the development of fresh fish transport from Iceland. Also compare cost of traditional packaging in expanded polystyrene (EPS) boxes to pack the product in tubs containing slurry ice. Export of fresh white fish fillets and loins from Iceland has increased rapidly over the last decade. More and more fillets and loins are transported with ships. What used to be an exclusive air freight business is now almost equal (air vs. sea). The results show that the volume of fillets and loins transported with ships from Iceland nearly six folded from 2004 to 2014. In 2013 and 2014 almost 90% of the export went to two markets; Britain and France. Results show that cost of packing product in tubs is significantly lower than using EPS boxes. Transportation cost was also lower in most cases when using tubs than EPS, as much as half of the cost when compared to the smallest EPS box (3 kg) in a full container. Some factors limit the practicality of using tubs rather than EPS. It is unlikely that tubs will replace boxes unless introducing matching distribution options. In some cases using tubs can be both practical and very cost efficient.

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Reports

Comparison of transport modes and packaging methods for fresh fish products - storage life study and life cycle assessment

Published:

01/10/2012

Authors:

Björn Margeirsson, Birgir Örn Smárason, Gunnar Þórðarson, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Eyjólfur Reynisson, Óðinn Gestsson, Emilía Martinsdóttir, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

AtVest (Atvinnuþróunarfélag Vestfjarði)

contact

Birgir Örn Smárason

Group Leader

birgir@matis.is

Comparison of transport modes and packaging methods for fresh fish products - storage life study and life cycle assessment

There is a great benefit in improved control of the value chain of exports of fresh fish knuckles for distribution in retail chains in the UK. Improved packaging methods could increase the shelf life of a product, which is fundamental to this business. With an airtight container, it would be possible to transport the product in a sludge tank with a low temperature (down to -1 ° C), which would both reduce the transport cost significantly and could also extend the shelf life of the product. The method also provides the option of packaging with consumer information, which makes further packaging abroad unnecessary. In air transport, it would be possible to pack all goods in a 12 kg foam box instead of 3 kg, as is most common today, thus saving significant transport costs. Temperature measurements, sensory evaluation, chemical and microbial measurements and life cycle analysis were used to compare different packaging solutions for sea and air transport. Fresh haddock pieces in vacuum-packed containers in a container with slush ice, which were stored at a typical temperature in container transport, turned out to have a shelf life of 3-4 days longer than the other experimental groups, probably mainly due to better temperature control. Consistency between the results of sensory evaluation and microbiological measurements was generally good. The lowest environmental impact of all groups was the pot group with sea-transported, vacuum-packed packaging, but this design could be further improved with regard to the mixing of the ice scraper and fish temperature control and thus the shelf life.

The aim of the project was to compare alternative packaging methods of fresh fish loins to the traditional packaging. Comparison was made between packages in terms of temperature control and product storage life by simulating air and sea transport from Iceland to UK in air climate chambers. The evaluation was made by the sensory panel and microbialand chemical analysis by the Matís laboratory in Reykjavík. Furthermore, the environmental impact of the aforementioned transport modes and packaging methods was assessed by means of LCA (Life Cycle Assessment). About 70–75% of Iceland's exports of fresh fillets and loins are transported by air and the rest by container ships. Increased knowledge on the advantages and disadvantages of the packages used for this fresh fish export will facilitate the selection of packages and improve the quality and storage life of the products. By using vacuum-packaging it is possible to use 12 kg packages in air freight instead of the traditional 3– 5 kg packages; but the market is increasingly demanding smaller individual packages. Sea transported larger packages use less space in shipping, lowering freight cost and environmental impact. Vacuum packed haddock loins immersed in slurry ice in a fish tub stored at sea transport temperature conditions proved to have a 3–4 day longer storage life than all the other experimental groups, probably mainly because of better temperature control. Good agreement was obtained between the sensory- and microbial evaluation. Finally, the sea transport-tub-group was found to be the most environmentally friendly and could be improved with regard to product temperature control and thereby storage life.

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Reports

Comparison of insulation of tanks with experiments and heat transfer models

Published:

01/04/2008

Authors:

Björn Margeirsson

Supported by:

Promens Dalvík ehf, Matís ohf

Comparison of insulation of tanks with experiments and heat transfer models

The aim of the project was to investigate the insulation value of three types of fish tanks. The pots were either insulated with polyethylene or polyurethane foam and of two sizes, 400 and 460 L. In two experiments, the temperature rise of water in the pots was monitored with a time with the initial temperature of the water approx. 4 ° C and ambient temperature approx. 18-20 ° C. The increase in temperature was also assessed using computerized heat transfer (CFD) models. The effect of forced airflow around the pot (forced heat transfer) was assessed by comparison with the heat condition in free heat transfer (in heat). The study showed that there is a considerable difference in the insulation of different pots and the pots came out differently depending on whether it was free or forced heat transfer. The results of measurements and heat transfer models for calm pots were well matched, but the model for wind pots needs to be improved. In further research into the insulation value of the pots, frozen fish should be used instead of water to further mimic the actual situation.

The aim of the project was to investigate the insulation capability of three types of fishing tubs. The tubs were either insulated with polyethylene or polyurethane foam and of two sizes; 400 and 460 L. In two experiments water temperature inside the tubs was monitored with initial water temperature ca. 4 ° C and ambient temperature ca. 18-20 ° C. The water temperature was also simulated in computational fluid dynamics models (CFD models). Influence of forcing air flow around the tubs (forced convection) was evaluated by comparison to free convection. Considerable difference was found between insulation capabilities of the different fishing tubs. Forced convection had different effects on different tub types. A good congruity was between experimental and CFD results for tubs in no wind, but some improvements should be done for the CFD model for tubs in wind (forced convection). In further research on insulation capability of the tubs iced fish should be used instead of water in order to resemble practical situations.

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