Reports

Effects of temperature fluctuations during storage and transport on quality and stability of frozen mackerel products

Published:

01/12/2015

Authors:

Magnea G. Karlsdóttir, Paulina E. Romotowska, Sigurjón Arason, Ásbjörn Jónsson, Magnús V. Gíslason, Arnljótur B. Bergsson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund (R 040-12)

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Effects of temperature fluctuations during storage and transport on quality and stability of frozen mackerel products

The aim of the project "Maximizing the quality of frozen mackerel products" is to study the quality and stability of mackerel products in frost according to the seasons and the effects of different pre-cooling, freezing and storage conditions. By looking at the interplay of these factors, it is possible to maximize the quality and utilization of mackerel and therefore at the same time its value. This is the first report from the project and it deals with the effects of temperature fluctuations during storage and transport on the quality and stability of frozen mackerel products. Evaluation factors included release, enzyme activity and evolution. Containers were transported to Japan. Whole frozen raw materials provided in late July and early September were frozen and stored at -25 ° C for one month. During "transfer", the product was stored at -18 ° C ± 5 ° C for one month. The samples were measured before freezing, after the "transfer", and thereafter every 3 months in storage at -25 ° C. For comparison, samples were stored at a constant temperature (-25 ° C). In addition, whole frozen mackerel products were stored for up to 12 months at -18 ° C as well as -15 ° C to assess the effects of different storage conditions. There was a clear difference in the quality and stability of frozen mackerel products that were stored at low and stable temperatures compared to products that were subjected to heat stress, for example due to container transport. The results show that mackerel should not be stored above - 25 ° C.

The aim of the project “Quality optimization of frozen mackerel products” is to study the quality and stability of mackerel products during frozen storage as affected by season, different pre-cooling methods, freezing techniques and storage conditions. This is the first report from the project and describes the effects of temperature fluctuations during storage and transportations on quality and stability of frozen mackerel products. The main attributes investigated were eg gaping, enzymatic activity and rancidity. Container shipment were simulated. Whole mackerel caught late July and early September was frozen and stored at -25 ° C for one month. During “transportation”, the products were heat abused at -18 ° C ± 5 ° C for one month. Samples were analyzed after freezing, the transportation and with 3 months interval during subsequent storage at -25 ° C. For comparison, samples were stored at stable temperature (-25 ° C). Additionally, frozen mackerel products were stored for up to 12 months at -18 ° C and -15 ° C to further evaluate the effects of storage temperature. A significant difference in quality and stability were detected between products stored at stable and low temperature and products that underwent heat abuse during eg transportation. The results demonstrate that frozen mackerel products should not be stored at higher temperatures than -25 ° C.

Report closed until 01.01.2018

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Reports

Effects of bleeding methods on the quality and storage life of cod and saithe products

Published:

01/02/2014

Authors:

Magnea G. Karlsdóttir, Nguyen Van Minh, Sigurjón Arason, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Paulina E. Romotowska, Arnjótur B. Bergsson, Stefán Björnsson

Supported by:

AVS (R 11 087‐11)

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Effects of bleeding methods on the quality and storage life of cod and saithe products

The aim of the project was to examine the effect of different bleeding methods on the quality and shelf life of different cod and saithe products. By identifying ideal conditions for bleeding, gutting and bleeding, it is possible to prevent product defects due to blood and at the same time increase the stability of the products in transport and storage. The fish were either bloodied in the hands and in the machine. Bleeding took place in slush or sea and the effects of different bleeding times were examined. The effect of waiting time on tires before bleeding was also assessed, as well as bleeding and gutting the fish in one step or two steps (gutting performed after bleeding). The products studied in this project were chilled and frozen cod and saithe products, as well as salted cod products. Of the variables studied in this project, their importance differed in terms of which fish species were involved and what the final product was. When comparing comparable sample groups of cod and saithe, it is seen that different conditions are suitable for each species. This supports the theory that it is probably not possible to transfer the best bleeding method of cod to saithe and vice versa. Bleeding time and type of bleeding agent (sludge vs. seawater) had a decisive effect on the stability of the cod and saithe products examined. Cod products, both chilled and frozen, from raw material soaked in sludge generally resulted in improved quality and stability compared to if soaked in seawater. In contrast to cod, the bleeding of saithe into the sea generally resulted in a stable end product. The way the fish were bled and gutted also had a decisive effect on the final products. In the case of frozen cod products, raw and gutted raw material in one step generally yielded a more stable product compared to raw material that was gutted after bleeding had occurred (two steps). Salted products, on the other hand, were much more stable in storage if the raw material was gutted after bleeding. Different results were also obtained for saithe depending on the final product involved. Bleeding and gutting of saithe in a machine had a positive effect on the shelf life of chilled products compared to if made by hand. Machine bleeding and gutting, on the other hand, resulted in a much more unstable product in the cold. The results of the project show that the effects of different bleeding methods are quite dependent on the raw material as well as the final product involved.

The main objective of the project was to study the effects of different bleeding methods on quality and storage life of various cod and saithe products. Products defects due to blood residues can be prevented by optimizing bleeding protocols, and hence increase the quality and storage life of the products. For this, fishes were either bled and gutted by hand or by machine. The bleeding (blood draining) was carried out with seawater or slurry ice, and the effects of different bleeding times in the tanks were also investigated. Moreover, the effects of waiting time (on deck) before bleeding, as well as the procedure of bleeding technique (bleeding and gutting in one procedure vs. gutting after blood draining) were investigated. The various products evaluated were chilled and frozen cod and saithe products, and salted cod products. The importance of the different parameters investigated in this project varied considerably with regard to fish species and the final products. Comparison of parallel treatments groups of cod and saithe demonstrated that optimum bleeding procedures are different for each species. Waiting time on deck and bleeding media (slurry ice vs. seawater) significantly affected the storage life of the cod and saithe products. Cod products, both chilled and frozen, from fish bled in slurry ice generally resulted in improved quality and storage life compared to fish bled in seawater. In contrast to cod, bleeding or saithe in seawater resulted however in more stable products. The procedure during bleeding and gutting also had great impact on the storage life of the various products studied. Shorter storage life of salted cod products was generally observed when the raw material was bled and gutted in one step compared to when gutting was performed after bleeding (two steps). Rather conflicting results were, however, observed for saithe and were depending on the type of final product. Bleeding and gutting of saithe by machine improved the storage life of chilled products compared to when the saithe was bled and gutted by hand. The machine procedure had, however, negative effects on the storage life of the frozen saithe products. Overall, the results of this project indicate that the effects of different bleeding methods are highly relative to fish species as well as the final product of interest.

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