Reports

By-products from the vegetable sector

Published:

07/03/2022

Authors:

Eva Margrét Jónudóttir, Ólafur Reykdal, Rósa Jónsdóttir

Supported by:

Matvælasjóður / Icelandic Food Innovation Fund

This report is part of the project "Improved quality, shelf life and reduced waste in the value chain of Icelandic vegetables." roughly estimate the amount of by-products that occur on an annual basis. In addition, chemical measurements were performed on selected by-products.

The report contains a summary of conclusions and proposals. It is believed that there is great potential for value creation from the by-products that occur during vegetable production in Iceland. One way of value creation is the isolation of bioactive substances for use in food, dietary supplements and cosmetics. Possibilities also include fermentation and acidification of by-products and their processing for incorporation into food. Horticultural waste must also have waterways that lead to utilization. Food safety should always be the first issue when developing products from by-products. It is therefore necessary to make measurements of undesirable substances in by-products before new products are developed.
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This report is a part of the project „Improved quality, shelf-life and reduced waste in the vegetable value chain.“ The main tasks were studies of (a) current utilization of by-products from the vegetable production, (b) possible product development, (c) information on toxins in the by-products, (d) amount of available by-products. Additionally, nutrient analyzes were carried out on selected by-products.

The report includes conclusions and proposals. It is concluded that there are considerable possibilities for value creation from vegetable by-products. One of the possibilities is the use of bioactive compounds from by-products for food, supplements and cosmetic products. Other possibilities are fermentation and addition of homogenized by-products to foods. Wastes from horticulture should also have routes for utilization. Food safety should always be considered when food uses of by-products are considered. Therefore, by-products should be analyzed for contaminants and toxicants.

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Reports

Analysis of waste in the vegetable value chain / Analysis of waste in the vegetable value chain

Published:

10/02/2022

Authors:

Rakel Halldórsdóttir, Ólafur Reykdal, Valur Norðri Gunnlaugsson

Supported by:

Matvælasjóður / Icelandic Food Innovation Fund

Contact

Ólafur Reykdal

Project Manager

olafur.reykdal@matis.is

The subject of this report is a discussion of waste in the wood chain of vegetables and ways to reduce it. The work was part of the project Increased quality, shelf life and less waste in the value chain of Icelandic vegetables, but the project was funded by the Food Fund in 2021.


The topics were as follows: (1) An overview of existing knowledge on food waste in Iceland was compiled. (2) Observations were made on supply chains and selected stores. Temperatures were measured in store refrigerators and sirites were used to record temperatures during the transport of vegetables. The parties concerned have received suggestions and had the possibility of corrections. (3) A survey of attitudes towards vegetable waste was carried out by parties outside the vegetable value chain. Information from all parties was compiled and solutions and innovation possibilities were identified. (4) A test was carried out on the processing of unsaleable vegetables and various methods for such utilization were identified.


In this report the waste in the Icelandic vegetable value chain is discussed
and possible solutions are suggested. The work was a part of a project on
improved quality, shelf-life and reduced waste in the Icelandic value
chain.
The following aspects were studied: (1) State of knowledge regarding food
waste in Iceland. (2) Examinations and temperature measurements under
transportation of vegetables and in supermarkets. (3) Investigation of
views towards waste of vegetables. (4) Possible product development
using vegetables otherwise wasted.

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Reports

Ingredients in Icelandic and imported vegetables

Published:

11/06/2020

Authors:

Ólafur Reykdal, Brynja Einarsdóttir

Contact

Ólafur Reykdal

Project Manager

olafur.reykdal@matis.is

Ingredients in Icelandic and imported vegetables

The aim of the project was to present data on cavities in Icelandic vegetables and compare them with results for imported vegetables. Cavities refer to vitamins and antioxidants.

Samples of 13 types of vegetables were taken, a total of 88 samples. Measurements were made of the vitamin A vitamins, vitamin E and folate. Of the antioxidants, polyphelols were measured along with ORAC and NPPH antioxidant activity. In some cases, there were more vitamins in Icelandic vegetables than in imported ones, such as vitamin A and folate in tomatoes. A lot of folate in cauliflower and beets attracts attention. Antioxidant activity was observed for all vegetable species. Significant antioxidant activity was observed for fungi in which vitamins A and E were not detectable. This shows that more substances than these vitamins are important for the antioxidant activity and it is possible that some important substances are still unknown. Measurements were also made of fiber, protein and fat. These results facilitate nutrition labeling. 

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Reports

Efling grænmetisræktar á Íslandi / Increased opportunities in Icelandic vegetable production

Published:

01/05/2012

Authors:

Guðjón Þorkelsson, Anna Lára Sigurðardóttir, Vigfús Ásbjörnsson, Sandra Rún Jóhannesdóttir, Gunnþórunn Einarsdóttir, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir, Valgerður Lilja Jónsdóttir

Supported by:

Job creation in coastal areas

Contact

Guðjón Þorkelsson

Strategy & Stakeholders

gudjon.thorkelsson@matis.is

Efling grænmetisræktar á Íslandi / Increased opportunities in Icelandic vegetable production

The purpose of this project was to identify opportunities in domestic vegetable growing at the expense of imported vegetables. The conditions of vegetable growers in Iceland were studied and the environment in which they live was brought to the surface. A preliminary survey was conducted on possible mapping of areas in Iceland and a search was made for possible information available for such mapping. A lot of useful information was found that is owned by parties who want to provide it if such mapping were to be carried out in the future. An extensive study was carried out on the school canteen and the food on the tables. The study was conducted with the aim of identifying and creating opportunities for vegetable producers to increase their production and processing of vegetables for a new target group that would be the school canteen of the future where domestic production would have more space.

The purpose of this project was to discover opportunities in local production of vegetables on the cost of imported products in the same industry. The conditions for local producers in Iceland were analyzed and the environment around them brought to the surface. An analyzes where taken on the possibilities on producing maps for Icelandic vegetable producers where different growing conditions for vegetable production would be brought into one map for the producers to have to see different condition for different vegetable in different areas in Iceland. It was discovered that lots of data is available for such a map which will be available if a production of such a map will take place. A big research was performed on a school canteen with the purpose of discovering opportunities for local producers for entering into this type of market segment in Iceland where the locally produced vegetables would get more space.

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Reports

Utilization of raw materials from the plant and animal kingdom in fish feed

Published:

10/07/2011

Authors:

Ásbjörn Jónsson, Jón Árnason, Ragnheiður Þórarinsdóttir, Sjöfn Sigurgísladóttir

Supported by:

Vocational Training Fund of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Security

Utilization of raw materials from the plant and animal kingdom in fish feed

Feed costs in aquaculture are generally around 50‐70% of operating costs and a large proportion of raw materials in feed are imported. The purpose of this report is to compile information on the possibility of utilizing domestic raw materials used in agriculture and fisheries for aquaculture feed. It is considered that the raw materials are generally used for aquaculture and the summary is not limited to individual species. It is possible to use by-products from the fisheries sector as feed in aquaculture, but by-products from the plant kingdom need to be treated in order to reduce / eliminate a high proportion of fiber and increase the protein content. By-products of the plant kingdom may be used as food for invertebrates, bacteria and fungi, thus producing a protein-rich product suitable for fish feed.

Feed cost in aquaculture is about 50‐70% of the total cost, and most of the feed is imported. The aim of this report is to gather information about utilizing by-products from agriculture and fishing industry as a feed in aquaculture. By-products from the fishing industry can be used as feed in aquaculture but it is necessary to lower the level of fiber and increase protein in by-products from agriculture. This can possibly be done by using the by-products as feed for invertebrates, bacteria and mushrooms and produce protein rich feed for aquaculture.

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