Reports

Measurements of the characteristics of foal meat

Published:

03/07/2019

Authors:

Eva Margrét Jónudóttir, Guðjón Þorkelsson, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir

Supported by:

Agricultural Productivity Fund

contact

Eva Margrét Jónudóttir

Researcher

evamargret@matis.is

Measurements of the characteristics of foal meat

Domestic horsemeat sales are only about half of production, and while meat consumption is growing with increased economic growth, this does not apply to horsemeat. Horses are generally not bred specifically for meat production, but the meat is a by-product of equestrian breeding and drug production from mare's blood. The popularity of equestrianism and the production of medicines are unlikely to decline in the next few years, so there is every reason to make horsemeat high and thus prevent further marketing problems in the future. Horse meat has been in a marketing campaign abroad in recent months, especially in Asia, but information is lacking about its characteristics. The main goal of the project was to gather and disseminate information that supports and facilitates the way of marketing and sales of horsemeat. Products from three foals slaughtered on 03.12.18 were examined. Thermostat was placed in the refrigerator and in the innermost muscles of the body. Acid syringes were inserted into their spinal muscles after slaughter. All carcasses were deboned in the slaughterhouse at Hella and weighed according to the division into muscle, processing material, bones and fat. Each muscle was divided into 4 parts. The first was in color measurement, the second in chemical measurement, the third in sensory evaluation and the fourth in surgical measurement and measurement of southern shrinkage. In addition, samples were sent for analysis of bacterial counts as well as Listeria bacteria. It took about 17 hours for acidity to fall into the spinal muscles after slaughter and it took about 24 hours in the refrigerator after slaughter for the carcass to reach a perfect ambient temperature at 5 ° C. Measurements on cooked muscle confirm that foal meat is tender meat. Sequence of increasing surgical force (viscosity) is: Puffs <ball steak <arch muscle <hip stitch <thigh tongue <vertebral muscle <lump <outer thigh <brisket <inner thigh muscle. Southern atrophy during cooking was about 25%. Listeria moinocytogenes was never measured and all samples were below microbial criteria. Flavor was generally low or not measurable but increases proportionally more with increasing intramuscular fat as it lasts during storage. According to color measurements, foal meat is similarly light but slightly redder and yellower than lamb and there was a nuance difference between the muscles. After 14 days of storage, the meat became slightly redder / yellower. Muscles used as whole muscle by carcass are only 34.7% of total dead weight. The raw material is 28.9%, which tells us that the proportion of what is normally used by the drop weight is 63.6%. Horse meat has everything to offer in order to be sold as a high-quality meat product, and there should be nothing to prevent it from making better use of this valuable resource.

The main objective was to gather and disseminate information that will support marketing of equine meat. Meat and offals from three foals were analyzed. Temperature was monitored in chiller and carcasses after slaughter and pH loggers were placed in the loin muscle (m. Longissimus dorsi). Yield was measured by cutting the carcasses into muscles, triminngs, fat and bone the day after slaughter. Each muscle was cut into 4 parts.The first was used for measuring CIELAB L, a, b * color. The second was analyzed for nutritional value. The third was cooked and analyzed for sensory properties and the fourth cooked and analyzed for Warner Bratzler shear force and cooking loss. In addition, samples were submitted for analysis of bacterial numbers as well as Listeria bacteria. It took about 17 hours for the pH to drop in the loin muscles after slaughter and it took about 24 hours for the carcasses to reach chiller temperature of 5 ° C. Shear force analysis confirmed the tenderness of foal meat. Cooking loss was about 25%. Listeria monocytogenes was not detected, and all samples were within acceptable limits for microbial counts. Generally, rancid flavor was little or not detected but increased proportionally with increasing intramuscular fat and storage time. Foal meat is similar to or lighter but more reddish and yellow than lamb met and there are slight differences between muscles. After 14 days of storage, the meat became slightly redder / yellower. Whole muscles were only 34.7% of carcass weight. Meat trimmings were 28.9%. The total yield was therefore 63.5%. Foal meat is a high-quality meat product and there are opportunities to market as such, and also to develop new products from the trimmings.

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Reports

Drying of herring fillets

Published:

01/04/2012

Authors:

Vigfús Ásbjörnsson, Guðjón Þorkelsson, Loftur Þórarinsson, Arnljótur Bjarki Bergsson, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

contact

Guðjón Þorkelsson

Strategy & Stakeholders

gudjon.thorkelsson@matis.is

Drying of herring fillets

The aim of the project is to create added value by fully processing herring products in Iceland by researching the processes of dried herring for human consumption in foreign markets. Dried herring markets in Japan and processing methods were studied. An experiment was conducted with a production process that aims to shorten work processes in a centuries-old Japanese drying method called the Migaki effect on herring (air drying).

The projects goal is to create increased value through processing of herring products in Iceland by analyzing production methods of dried herring for human consumption in foreign markets. Analyzes where performed on dried herring markets in Japan as well as production methods. Experiment was performed that aims to shorten the procedures of an ancient Japanese method of drying herring known as the Migaki method, (air drying).

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Reports

Processing of nephrops lobster claw meat

Published:

01/03/2012

Authors:

Vigfús Ásbjörnsson, Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

contact

Óli Þór Hilmarsson

Project Manager

oli.th.hilmarsson@matis.is

Processing of nephrops lobster claw meat

The project was about the utilization of previously unused raw materials from seafood, which is lobster meat. The project involved both the processing of lobster claw marrow and the processing of marrow products. Processing processes were defined using utilization factors and raw materials were studied. The processing properties of the marlin were studied and tested in two products. Estimated margins were measured to assess the feasibility of complete processing of lobster marrow products. Efforts will be made to make full use of all the raw materials that come from lobster clones so that value creation is maximized in the processing of food related to lobster claws from lobster claws.

A process for isolating mince from nephrops lobster claws was developed and the product tested for microbial, chemical and sensory quality. The mince was tested in two ready to eat products. Production cost, yield and gross margin were calculated in order to determine the feasibility of starting up an industrial scale production of the mince as well as for production of ready to eat products.  

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Reports

Influence of drying methods on the properties of dulse

Published:

01/06/2011

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Irek Klonowski

Supported by:

AVS

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Influence of drying methods on the properties of dulse

Knowledge of the parameters that control the quality and properties of dried silver (Palmaria palmata) is relatively small and little is known. If the utilization of brokers is to be increased and expanded, it is important to study these variables in more detail and document them. This report presents the results of experiments whose main objective was to compare the effects of three different drying methods on the nutritional value and physical properties of dried silver. The drying methods compared were solar drying, oven drying and lyophilization, as well as the effect of the effect on the sun-dried salts was assessed. Comparable changes in nutrients were measured after the drying process. The main difference in terms of drying methods was detected in the amount of vitamin C. There was a noticeable difference in color and texture. Taste properties were not measured but it is believed that there is some difference. Despite the fact that the results gave certain answers, many questions arose when interpreting them. There is therefore a need to acquire more knowledge about the properties of silver and their interaction with different processing factors.

The influence of three different drying methods on selected nutritional and physiochemical properties of dulse were compared; sun drying, oven drying and freeze drying. Similar influence was found on nutritional components. The main difference was found on vitamin C retention. Difference was found as well in color and texture. Flavor characteristics were not analyzed, however some differences are expected. Despite giving some answers, the results raised many questions on their interpretation. There is a need for extended knowledge on the properties of dulse and their interplay with different processing parameters.

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Reports

The uniqueness of traditional skyr / Uniqueness of traditional skyr

Published:

01/05/2011

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Þórarinn E. Sveinsson

Supported by:

Agricultural Productivity Fund

contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

The uniqueness of traditional skyr / Uniqueness of traditional skyr

Skyr is an important part of the Icelandic heritage, since the settlement, but a dairy product under this same name was then known in all the Nordic countries. Skyrgerð, however, seems to have been preserved only in Iceland. Major changes have taken place in the production of skyr in the last century with the advent of its factory production, and there has been a discussion that traditional skyr should be affected. This summary will cover information gathering on traditional skyr production, a survey of where and how it is produced today, an overview of research, criteria and descriptions of traditional skyr, as well as the preparation of an application for international recognition of traditional skyr. . Such recognition can lead to an increase in the value of the product and contribute to the maintenance and growth of work knowledge that is currently in decline. This can boost local food production, diversify it and thereby increase the number of valuable jobs.

Skyr is an important part of Icelandic heritage, dating back to the settlement of the country. At that time skyr production existed as well in the other Nordic countries but seems to have vanished except for Iceland. With industrial production starting in the 20th century, processing of skyr has changed, and growing concern is of the maintenance of traditional skyr production. In this summation, overview of existing knowledge on traditional skyr production is made as well as opportunities for international recognition are discussed. Such recognition could be a tool for maintaining the traditional production and processing knowledge, as well as provide opportunities for local food production in rural areas.

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Reports

Taste and pastures. Progress report

Published:

01/12/2009

Authors:

Rósa Jónsdóttir, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Óli Þór Hilmarsson, Guðjón Þorkelsson

Supported by:

Agricultural Productivity Fund, Agricultural University of Iceland

contact

Rósa Jónsdóttir

Group Leader

rosa.jonsdottir@matis.is

Taste and pastures. Progress report

The project is about researching and investigating whether there are differences in the characteristics and tastes of lamb meat according to grazing habits and the origin of lambs in them. The purpose is to further strengthen the basis for the processing and sale of lamb directly from the farm based on the specificities of each area. The project is carried out in collaboration with Austurlambur, Búnaðarsamband Austurlands, the towns of Hákonarstaðir and StóraBreiðuvík, Gunnarsstaðir, Matís and the Association of Chefs. It is divided into preparation by farmers, slaughter and sampling, measurements of flavors and aromas, assessment of culinary properties, settlement and presentation at the Agricultural Research Council and preparation of promotional material for the farm / area in question for use in marketing and finally writing a scientific article on the research. The project hopes to be able to describe in detail the taste and characteristics of lamb meat of different grazing types to use when the meat is sold in the local lamb market in online stores, tourism, restaurants and other gourmet markets so that higher prices can be obtained. the meat and higher profitability directly on the farm. The farm in question and Austurlamb will utilize the results in promotions and marketing work, as well as the project being useful to other producers and processors of lamb meat. All preparation, slaughter, sampling and measurements have been completed and the results are being processed. A final report and publication of the results is expected in February at the Agricultural Research Council. At the end of January, a half-day seminar on the effects of grazing on the taste of lamb is planned, held at Matvælaskólinn in Kópavogur with the participation of Matís, Matvælaskólinn, sheep farmers and chefs.

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