Reports

Value adding technique - Drying of pelagic fish

Published:

13/12/2017

Authors:

Ásbjörn Jónsson, Cyprian Ogombe Odoli, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

Contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Value adding technique - Drying of pelagic fish

The aim of the project was to improve the processing process and the quality and safety of dried sardines produced in Kenya. Like looking at new products such as dried capelin from Iceland for possible export to Kenya. The results showed that it was possible to ensure the quality of dried products such as capelin in Iceland. During indoor drying, conditions such as temperature can be controlled, thus preventing protein deformation and fat development. The results also showed that sardines, which were dried outdoors in Kenya at higher temperatures compared to indoor drying, were of poorer quality, as protein deformation occurred along with evolution. On the other hand, market surveys in Kenya showed that a certain group of consumers liked dried capelin from Iceland and were willing to buy the product.

The objective of the project was to improve the process and quality and safety of dried sardines produced in Kenya. As well as introduce new products from Iceland like dried capelins a possible export to Kenya. Results showed that it was possible to control the quality of dried products like capelin in Iceland. By indoor drying, the conditions can be controlled, like temperature and providing denaturation of proteins and oxidation of fat. Results also showed that sardines dried in open air in Kenya with higher temperature compared with indoor drying, had lower quality, were denaturation of proteins and oxidation of fat occurred. Market research indicated that certain social groups of consumers in Kenya liked indoor drying capelin from Iceland, and were willing to by such product.

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Reports

Research on the prevalence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in Icelandic chicken products on the consumer market

Published:

01/09/2013

Authors:

Eyjólfur Reynisson, Viggó Þór Marteinsson, Franklín Georgsson

Supported by:

Matís, Ministry of Industry and Innovation

Contact

Viggó Marteinsson

Research Group Leader

viggo.th.marteinsson@matis.is

Research on the prevalence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in Icelandic chicken products on the consumer market 

With the adoption of most of the food rules and EU food legislation (178/2002 and 102/2010), it is clear that the import of fresh meat products to Iceland could become a reality, but so far the government has banned such imports altogether. In this context, there is a need to obtain data on the safety of Icelandic products on the market with regard to microbial contamination. Extensive data are available on the frequency of Salmonella and Campylobacter in poultry farming in Iceland and at slaughter in recent years, but there has been a lack of information on the state of affairs in the consumer market. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the frequency of these pathogens in Icelandic fresh chicken products on the market. A total of 537 samples were taken over a 12-month period from May 2012 to April 2013 from the country's three largest producers. 183 packs of whole chickens, 177 packs of breasts and 177 packs of wings were examined. All samples in the study were negative for both Salmonella and Campylobacter. It is therefore clear that the situation in these countries is very good and as good or better than what is happening in other countries.

With the adoption of the main parts of the EU food legislation (178/2002 and 102/2010) it is evident that import of fresh meat and poultry could be possible even though at present it is still prohibited by the Icelandic government. In this respect it is advisable to keep data on the safety of Icelandic products already on the market for current reference. Extensive data are available of the frequency of Salmonella and Campylobacter at the breeding and slaughtering steps in the poultry supply chain in Iceland but no systematic data collection has been done at the retail level in recent years. The aim of this study was therefore to estimate the frequency of contamination of the above mentioned pathogens in consumer packs of Icelandic poultry production. A total of 537 samples were collected in a 12 month period from May 2012 to April 2013 from the three largest domestic producers. Total of 183 packs of whole chicken were analyzed, 177 packs of fillets and 177 packs of wing cuts. All samples measured negative both for Salmonella and Campylobacter. It is therefore confirmed that the monitoring scheme and intervention policy in Icelandic poultry production is effective and that the status of contamination of these pathogens in fresh retail poultry packs is as good as, or better than in other EU states.

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Reports

Lobster Bisque from the Chef - development and marketing

Published:

01/01/2013

Authors:

Vigfús Ásbjörnsson, Jón Sölvi Ólafsson

Supported by:

AVS Fisheries Research Fund

Lobster Bisque from the Chef - development and marketing

The purpose of the project was to start marketing both domestic and foreign markets at Kokkar's Lobster Broth. A market study was conducted both in the domestic market and in foreign markets. Business contacts were established in foreign markets, in addition to which extensive product design was carried out on the product, which is useful both domestically and in foreign markets. The product was made ready for foreign markets so that products can be sent out at short notice. A proposal was made on how best to manage the production and make the product more efficient in production, in addition to which a powerful marketing campaign was launched which resulted in a 30% increase in sales right at the beginning of the campaign.

The purpose of the project was to initiate target attendance in both domestic and overseas market for the Lobster Bisque from the chef. A market research vas performed both in domestic and foreign markets. Business relationships were developed onto foreign markets as well as the product was taken into a major product design process which can be used both on domestic as well as foreign markets in order to make the product ready to be sent out to foreign markets in the future. It was proposed how the best in practice production for the product could look like in order to make the production more efficient. In the end a power full marketing process was lunched which generated 30% increase in sale for the domestic market.

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Reports

Icelandic baby food - market and public requirements

Published:

01/04/2011

Authors:

Þóra Valsdóttir, Rakel Eva Sævarsdóttir, Gunnþórunn Einarsdóttir, Guðjón Þorkelsson, Aðalheiður Ólafsdóttir, Kolbrún Sveinsdóttir

Supported by:

Agricultural Productivity Fund

Contact

Þóra Valsdóttir

Project Manager

thora.valsdottir@matis.is

Icelandic baby food - market and public requirements

Baby food refers to food that is specifically intended for infants and young children, with the exception of milk mixtures that are to replace breast milk. There are many things to consider before starting the production of baby food. Toddlers and infants are much more vulnerable in every way than adults. High demands are therefore made on safe production. Icelandic raw materials, especially vegetables and lamb, are well suited for the production of baby food because here the use of pesticides in agriculture is less than in most places and contaminants and pollutants are kept to a minimum. The results of discussion groups for parents of young children and toddlers indicate that there are opportunities to bring new, Icelandic products to market. In particular, there seems to be a lack of more types of baby food than are already available, but there are also opportunities to adapt the packaging and portion sizes of traditional Icelandic food to the needs of young children and toddlers. Purchased baby food has a negative connotation in the minds of many. In order for a new product intended for young and young children to be successful, it is first and foremost important to build trust in the brand among the buyers.

Baby food is food which is specially aimed towards infants and toddlers, excluding infant formulas which are replacement for breast milk. Many things have to be considered before starting producing baby food. Infants and toddlers are much more susceptive than grown-ups. High demands are therefore on safety of the production. Icelandic raw material, especially vegetables and lamb meat, are well suited for baby food as in Iceland the use of pesticides in agriculture is much lower than in most countries and pollution levels are low. Results from focus group discussions among Icelandic parents indicate that there are opportunities for new, Icelandic products on the market. There is especially a need for more variety but there is as well a market for existing Icelandic products in more suitable form and packaging for infants and toddlers. Processed baby food has negative image in the eyes of many parents. For new baby food products to succeed it is essential to build up a trust among parents on the integrity of the producer and quality of the products.

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Reports

Production of salted fish in the Nordic countries. Variation in quality and characteristics of the salted products

Published:

01/12/2010

Authors:

Kristín Anna Þórarinsdóttir, Ingebrigt Bjørkevoll, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

NORA (Journal No. 510-036)

Contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Production of salted fish in the Nordic countries. Variation in quality and characteristics of the salted products

The Nordic countries are the largest exporters of salted gadoid products, whereas countries in South ‐ Europe and Latin America are the biggest importers. In Norway, Iceland and Faroe Islands, cod is primarily used for the production. The characteristics of the salted fish, such as commercial quality and weight yield vary between the countries and between producers. These attributes are influenced by differences in catching methods, handling and salting methods. This report summarizes the variation in these procedures, and in addition, the market segmentation of salted products, from the different countries.

The majority of the world's salted fish production takes place within the Nordic countries, but the largest group of consumers is in Southern Europe and South America. Cod is the main raw material, but salted fish is also produced from other related species, such as saithe, ling, haddock and saithe. Properties of salted fish products, such as quality and utilization, vary between countries of production and producers. These variables depend on fishing methods, raw material handling and salting methods. The report is a summary of the variability in these factors between producing countries, as well as an assessment of their share in the salted fish markets.

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Reports

Fish protein markets. Analysis of products on the market

Published:

01/04/2008

Authors:

Guðjón Þorkelsson, Þóra Valsdóttir, Guðrún Anna Finnbogadóttir, Sigrún Mjöll Halldórsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS

Contact

Guðjón Þorkelsson

Strategic Scientist

gudjon.thorkelsson@matis.is

Fish protein markets. Analysis of products on the market

The report begins with a general description of proteins in the food market, ie. different types of proteins and market share. The main products with fish proteins are also described, i.e. fishmeal, fish protein concentrate, surimi, isolati, fish digestion, fish sauce, flavors, gelatin, dietary supplements and their health-related properties. Targeted diet with soy, milk and fish proteins is described. The main conclusions about the position of fish proteins in this market are: The use of protein isolates in injected and tumbled products will increase the economic, nutritional and environmental value with better utilization of raw materials in fillet processing. Also in the production of prepared seafood. There are still many problems that need to be solved. It would be possible to achieve considerably more value if it were possible to produce high-quality isolates from fatty pelagic fish. Despite indications of various excellent processing properties of fish proteins, methods of isolation and purification are less advanced than for vegetable and milk proteins. They can not compete with them as excipients in prepared foods. However, there is a good chance of developing more supplements from hydrolyzed fish proteins (VFP), for example to reduce blood pressure or to increase the body's protection against stress. Certain protein products can even be used to control appetite in the fight against obesity. In addition, there are products on the market to lower the glycemic index. The market for such fish protein products is not large but is likely to grow, and there are opportunities to use traditional production methods such as fermentation to increase the bioactivity properties of VFP and use them in products known to consumers. It is very likely that low-salt fish sauces and fish flavors with specially designed bioactive properties will be on offer in the future. However, this is partly due to the fact that the health claims are accepted. This requires extensive and costly research that will require both public bodies and companies to pay for.

A short overview is given for products and the market for food protein ingredients. The main types of fish protein products are described, that is, fish meal, fish protein concentrate and isolate, surimi, fish silage, fish sauce, fish flavors and gelatine. Food supplements with soy, dairy and fish proteins or peptides and their health-related properties are covered. The main conclusions for the future outlook for fish protein and peptide products are: Applying protein isolates as water binders in injected and tumbled products will result in greater additional economic, nutritional and environmental values by increasing the yield of raw materials in fish filleting operation and by using them in production of ready-to-eat seafood products. There would be an even greater economic advantage if pH-shift methods could be used to produce high-quality isolates from raw material that today is unfit for traditional processing. Fish protein ingredients cannot compete on price, size and quality with plant and dairy proteins on the functional ingredient market. Plant and dairy ingredients will continue to be a part of formulating ready-to-eat convenience fish products. More supplements from FPH can be developed to reduce high blood pressure but they will face heavy competition from other protein sources. The antioxidant properties of FPH can be employed in supplements and food products to enhance the antioxidant defenses of the body against oxidative stress. They can also be used as immunomodulators to enhance non-specific host defense mechanisms. Specific protein products can even be made to control food intake in the fight against obesity. The market for such products made from fish proteins is not big but it will grow and there are also opportunities for adapting traditional food processes like fermentation to enhance the bioactive properties of FPH and to use them in products that consumers already know. Low-salt fish sauce and fish flavors with tailor-made bioactive properties are likely the future. Sufficient scientific evidence must be produced if companies are to produce and sell products with health claims. Private companies, universities and other research organizations can work together on special hydrolysates or peptides but the cost might be too high for small companies, so a global collaboration may be needed in the interests of fisheries, fish processing industries and consumers worldwide.

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