Reports

Temperature changes during processing, transportation and storage of frozen herring products

Published:

30/08/2019

Authors:

Magnea Karlsdóttir, Finnur Jónasson, Ásbjörn Jónsson, Sigurjón Arason

Supported by:

AVS R&D Fund

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Temperature changes during processing, transportation and storage of frozen herring products

The main objective of the project was to maximize the qualiry and value of herring products. Quality and stability of frocen herring products seasonally and impact of pre-cooling, freezing and storage condition were explored. The results will not only lead to a less decrease in quality due to storage and transportation, but also increase understanding on connection between product defect and their influence on the raw material from catch to market.

The results showed thar frozen herring products did not get enough cooling through the process, from production to export, and in some cases the variation was too much. The freezing planti n Iceland was good, and all the pallets were kept at right temperature. The problem is, when they were taken out of the freezing storage in Iceland, the cooling was not sufficient, which was necessary to maintain low temperature. It is difficult to prevent heat stress when exporting frozen product.

The results of the project indicated that the temprature in freezing trawls was stable during the sailing. Also the results indicated that it is a need for improvements in the freezing plant in Poland, where the temperature in freezing storage is higher compared to Iceland. Transportation in containers was much better than in freezing trawlers, but much more expensive.

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Reports

Drying and storing of harvested grain - A Review of Methods / Drying and storage of grain

Published:

01/04/2018

Authors:

Ólafur Reykdal

Supported by:

Northern Periphery and Arctic Program

contact

Ólafur Reykdal

Project Manager

olafur.reykdal@matis.is

Drying and storing of harvested grain - A Review of Methods / Drying and storage of grain

In the Arctic, grain is generally cut so moist that it is quickly damaged if it is not dried or soaked in feed. Drying grain is costly and therefore the choice of equipment and energy sources must be carefully considered. The use of geothermal energy is recommended where possible, as geothermal energy should be the cheapest energy source. Mixed solutions can work well, such as geothermal energy and diesel fuel. Agriculture needs to aim for increased sustainability and then geothermal and electricity are good options. Some molds in the field or in storage can form mycotoxins (fungal toxins) in humid and warm conditions. Mycotoxins can be harmful to human and livestock health. The risk of mycotoxin imaging is minimal in cold northern areas. However, it is necessary to monitor the quality of grain in storage and monitor the possible formation of mycotoxins. This report provides an overview of drying methods, energy sources and grain safety and is the basis for advice and research on grain drying.

In the Northern Periphery Region, grains are usually harvested at moisture contents too high for safe storage. Therefore the grain should be dried (or wet processed) as soon as possible. The drying process is expensive and the selection of equipment and fuel should be studied carefully. Where available, the use of geothermal water is recommended. In Iceland, geothermal energy has been found to be the cheapest energy source for grain drying. The use of mixed solutions, eg geothermal energy and diesel, is possible. Grain producers should aim at increased sustainability. Excellent solutions are geothermal energy and electricity. Mold in the field or in stores can produce mycotoxins under humid conditions and quite high temperature. Mycotoxins can harm the health of humans and animals. The existence of mycotoxins in grain grown under the cool conditions of northern regions is likely to be minimal but the situation should be studied and monitored. This report reviews grain drying methods, possible energy sources, safety aspects and is the basis for guidelines and case studies.

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Reports

Optimized Chilling Protocols for Fresh Fish

Published:

01/12/2010

Authors:

Björn Margeirsson, Hélène L. Lauzon, Lárus Þorvaldsson, Sveinn Víkingur Árnason, Sigurjón Arason, Kristín Líf Valtýsdóttir, Emilía Martinsdóttir

Supported by:

AVS R&D Fund of Ministry of Fisheries in Iceland, the Technology Development Fund at the Icelandic Center for Research, University of Iceland Research Fund and EU (contract FP6-016333-2)

contact

Sigurjón Arason

Chief Engineer

sigurjon.arason@matis.is

Optimized Chilling Protocols for Fresh Fish

Guidelines for cooling fresh fish describe the most effective cooling methods at all stages of the cooling chain, with an emphasis on white fish. It describes how to best cool and maintain temperatures in order to maximize product quality and safety and reduce costs and energy consumption. The report contains background information for instructions in the information source Kæligátt on Matís' website, which is presented in a user-friendly way in Icelandic www.kaeligatt.is and English www.chillfish.net. The guidelines are intended for fishermen, manufacturers, carriers and other members of the value chain. The guidelines are based on research that has been carried out within research projects such as Chill ‐ on, Simulation of cooling processes and Cooling improvement. The main chapters deal with refrigeration on board, during processing, during packing, transport and storage of fish.

The overall aim of the optimized chilling protocols is to describe the most effective chilling methods for any stage in the food supply chain with emphasis on whitefish. This comprises optimization of the whole chain for lowering and maintaining low temperature with the aim of maximizing quality and safety of the products and minimizing costs and energy use. This report is the background for the protocols and guidelines published with open access at Matís website in Icelandic and English in a user ‐ friendly way: www.chillfish.net. These are protocols to follow aimed at the use of fishermen, manufacturers, transporters and other stakeholders in the fisheries chain. The information is divided into subchapters of different links in the chain. How to chill fish on ‐ board, during processing, packaging, transport and storage are the main chapters.

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Reports

SSS PREDICTION WORKSHOP

Published:

29/04/2010

Authors:

Paw Dalgaard, Anna Kristín Daníelsdóttir, Steinar B. Aðalbjörnsson

contact

Anna Kristín Daníelsdóttir

Deputy CEO / Director of Research & Innovation

annak@matis.is

SSS PREDICTION WORKSHOP

Courses in the use of forecasting programs in the fisheries sector: SSS (Seafood Spoilage and Safety) Prediction version 3.1 2009 (http://sssp.dtuaqua.dk/), Combase (www.combase.cc) and Pathogen Modeling programs (http: // pmp .arserrc.gov/PMPOnline.aspx). The teacher is Dr. Paw Dalgaard from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and the teaching is in English. The program is useful for scientists, authorities and industry in the fisheries sector.

Workshop on the practical use of computer software to manage seafood quality and safety. It includes presentations and hands-on computer exercises to demonstrate how available software can be used by industry, authorities and scientists within the seafood sector. Examples with fresh fish, shellfish and ready-to-eat seafood (smoked and marinated products) are included in the workshop. Special attention is given to: (i) the effect of storage temperature and modified atmosphere packing on shelf-life and (ii) management of Listeria monocytogens according to existing EU regulations (EC 2073/2005 and EC 1441/2007) and new guidelines from the Codex Alimentarius Commission. The presentations included in the workshop are given in English by Paw Dalgaard from the Technical University of Denmark. Participants will use their own laptop computers for the PC-exercises included in the workshop. Instruction for download of freeware will be mailed to the participants prior to the start of the workshop.

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